Bowral Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Bowral Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Bowral Railway Station Group
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Station Street, Bowral, NSW 2576
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee

Boundary:

RailCorp property boundaries as shown on vesting plan, R29823.It should be noted that the original area of the railway station has been reduced, and that there is an historical and visual relationship with the surrounding area not necessarily apparent from the current property boundaries. As such, any proposed development within the vicinity of the railway station should also consider the historic relationship between the station site and its surrounding area.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Station StreetBowralWingecarribee  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Bowral Railway Group is of local significance as an important regional railway complex dating from 1867 that was constructed as one of the original stations along the Great Southern Railway, which opened up the southwest of NSW for trade during the mid 19th Century bringing increased settlement to the local area. The site is significant for its continuity of use for over 150 years and for its collection of railway structures that provide an interesting contrast in architectural styles and periods demonstrating how the place has continued to evolve in line with changes in railway design and technology. The structures including the 1890s Victorian station building, the 1915 Interwar station building, and the small timber signal box and out-of-shed are all good examples of their type. The station buildings remain substantially intact and are an important civic landmark in the townscape of Bowral and are complimented by their landscape setting.
Date significance updated: 26 Nov 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1892-1915
Physical description: MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by RailCorp
Station Building - type 3, Platform 2, brick (c.1892)
Station Building - type 11, Platform 1, brick (1915)
Signal Box - timber and skillion roof (1919)
Out-of-shed (Milk Shed) - timber (1915)
Platform faces - brick (1 - 1915, 2 - 1892?)
Walkway, Lifts and Stairs (c.2008)
Landscaping

MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by RIC
Overbridge (1912)


STATION BUILDING (c.1892)
A single storeyed Gothic style Station Building constructed of painted brickwork. The roof is gabled and features a pair of transverse gables. The roof also features three rendered brickwork chimneys with strongly articulated moulded tops. The projecting gables feature wide, unornamented bargeboards, truncated timber finials and simple cross bracing. On the street front elevation a small ogee profiled verandah covers the main entrance door. On the station frontage the skillion roofed awning over the platform is supported on a row of round cast iron columns. The ends of this awning feature vertical boarding with "lancet" shaped ends. Single storey brick parapeted wings are located at either end of the building; at the north end abutting the building and at the south separated by a narrow passageway.

The platform faces are brick.

STATION BUILDING (1915)
A single storey facebrick station building with a gabled roof continued as an awning over the platform (on the east elevation). The awning and roof are clad in corrugated sheet metal. The roof features a single corbelled brick chimney. The platform awning is supported on steel bracketed trusses fixed to the face of the building. The gable ends of the building are boarded and have simple timber bargeboards and finials. Windows are timber double hung sashes with single pane bottom sashes and 9 pane top sashes and feature heavily moulded and rendered sills with decorative sill detailing.

The platform faces are brick.

SIGNAL BOX (1919)
A standard platform level Signal Box constructed for duplication works. The building is clad in timber weatherboard with a corrugated steel skillion roof sloping towards the track. There is a small awning hood to the platform windows. Windows are sliding timber sash along the platform and casement to sides. The timber door features four upper glazed panels.

OUT-OF-SHED (1915)
A small shed clad in timber weatherboard on with a corrugated metal skillion roof sloping towards the track.

WALKWAY, LIFTS AND STAIRS (c.2008)
The 1911 overbridge has had a new walkway attached to the side upgraded for easy access. This involved erection of new lifts to both platforms, the stairs to Platform 1 relocated to Platform 2, and new stairs to Platform 1.

LANDSCAPING
The site is well landscaped and features mature trees, hedges and grassed areas, which add to the setting of the station buildings.

MOVABLE ITEMS
Two single timber rollover indicator boards with clock faces and foot pedals

ARCHAEOLOGICAL ITEMS
None identified.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Generally in good condition.
Date condition updated:11 Nov 09
Modifications and dates: Goods handling facilities previously existed at this location but outside the curtilage, A 20 ton weighbridge and hut are located outside the curtilage on the Down side of the railway line south of the station.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: Bowral Railway Precinct is located on the Main South line. Following the completion of the first railway from Sydney to Parramatta Junction in 1855, proposals for the first railways to the rest of NSW were driven by landed interests seeking improved transport for their wool from the inland centres of Goulburn, Bathurst, Singleton and Muswellbrook. When John Whitton arrived in Sydney in December 1856 to take up his position as Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, "he understood his job was to plan the extensions which would take the infant railway into the interior of Australia. At that time only the railway from Sydney to Liverpool was open, just twenty-one miles (34km) in length" (Lee, 2000, p98).

Plans for a railway line through the Southern Highlands of NSW can be traced to as early as August 1846, but it wasn’t until 1860 that definite plans were made to extend the Great Southern Railway to Picton with an extension to Goulburn. The line from Liverpool to Campbelltown was one of the first sections of line completed by Whitton in 1862. The line was then extended to Picton in 1863 and on to Moss Vale via Bowral in 1867.

Bowral station opened on 2 December 1867, with the original arrangement consisting of a loop and one track (the Down track being the original line before duplication). Early or original structures included the station buildings, Station Master’s residence and goods shed (all c1867). Cattle yards were erected in 1876, a ‘wharf’ (loading bank) provided for loading timber in 1879, and the Platform lengthened and a new loading stage provided in 1880. Other early additions included a 3 tonne crane, 10 tonne weighbridge, and platform for loading milk (1883), new loop and interlocking (1890). A new station platform and building were provided in c.1892, replacing the original station building (Forsyth, 1989).

Some later additions at Bowral included construction of the Overbridge (1912), new platform and station building (1915), milk shed (1915), signal box (1919), removal and re-erection of the goods shed and yard crane on Down side (1919), addition of a metal loading stage (1920), and the removal and re-erection of stockyards (1929). The stockyards were demolished in 1985 (Forsyth, 1989).

The Station Master’s residence has been sold and is now privately owned.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Transport of goods-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping inland settlements-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Railway gardens-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site has historic significance as an important regional railway complex dating from 1867 that was constructed as one of the original stations along the Great Southern Railway which opened up the southwest of NSW for trade during the mid 19th Century bringing increased settlement to the local area. The site is also significant for its continuity of use for over 150 years and for its ability to provide evidence of how the site has continued to evolve in line with changes in railway design and technology.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The site has aesthetic significance for its collection of railway structures that provide an interesting contrast in architectural styles and periods. The station buildings including the 1890s Victorian second-class station building and the 1915 standard Interwar station building remain substantially intact and form an important civic landmark in the townscape of Bowral and are complimented by their landscape setting.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The site is of social significance to the local community on account of its lengthy association for providing an important source of employment, trade and social interaction for the local area. The site is significant for its ability to contribute to the local community’s sense of place, is a distinctive feature of the daily life of many community members, and provides a connection to the local community’s past.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The main 1890s station building is classified as a ‘Type 3’ second-class station building and is one of approximately 40 other similar station buildings across NSW. The 1915 station building is representative of a series of standard designs introduced in the 1900s and constructed in many other locations across NSW. The signal box and small timber out-of-shed are also good examples of typical structures built for duplication works across the state. The site has representative significance for its collection of railway structures demonstrating widespread 19th and early 20th Century railway customs, activities and design in NSW, and is representative of similar items that are found in many other railway sites across the state.
The stairs (footbridge/overbridge) were identified as an item of moderate heritage significance in the comparative analysis from the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’.
Integrity/Intactness: The station buildings have a moderate level of integrity. Building fabric is mostly intact, minor details missing.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    
Heritage studyBowral Railway Station Group    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA279State Rail Authority  No
Heritage and Conservation Register State Rail Authority of NSW1993143Paul Davies for SRA  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 ORH  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenForsyth, J.H1989Stations and tracks volume 2: Main Southern Line Granville Junction to Albury
WrittenMcKillop, R2009NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History
WrittenRobert Lee2000Colonial Engineer
WrittenState Rail Authority of NSW1993How and why of station names

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801279


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