Hornsby Railway Station Group and Barracks | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Hornsby Railway Station Group and Barracks

Item details

Name of item: Hornsby Railway Station Group and Barracks
Other name/s: Hornsby Railway Yard; Hornsby Railway Depot
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Other - Transport - Rail
Primary address: Bridge Road, Hornsby, NSW 2077
Local govt. area: Hornsby

Boundary:

Station Group:North: 5 north of platform 2/3 and 5m north of the northern wall of the substation building;South: the southern edge of the overhead concourse (including the concourse);East: eastern edge of Platform 1 (adjacent to the George Street car park) and western edge of the live lines (along the fence line between the tracks and the substations and signal boxes) West: the fence between Platform 5 and the western carpark on Station Street, and the property boundary adjacent to Jersey StreetBarracks (excluding the surrounding demountable buildings):North: 5m from the northern wallSouth: 5m from the southern wallEast: the western edge of the live tracksWest: the property boundary to Jersey StreetWhile the railway precinct at Hornsby is much larger than the curtilages identified above, extending from the Pacific Highway in the south to Bridge Road in the north and flanked by Jersey Road and Station Street on the west and George Street in the east, the extent of change that has occurred within this zone has resulted in a significantly reduced heritage curtilage, linked to the railway station proper extending to include the former signal box and former substation, and a separate curtilage surrounding the barracks.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Bridge RoadHornsbyHornsby  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

The Hornsby Railway Station has local heritage significance. The station was one of the original stops on the first section of the Short North line completed in 1886 and as such has historic association with the linkage of Sydney and Newcastle, which was a major event in the history of NSW railways. It also became the junction between the Short North line and the North Shore line when the latter opened in 1890 and so was a key regional station acting as a hub for the transport of passengers and goods, the change over of railway drivers and guards and the minor servicing of rolling stock. The site has always been and remains a major passenger interchange and the number of platforms, station buildings and the detailed architectural style of the main station building on Platform 4 continues to demonstrate this historic role and the importance of the station. As a significant rail hub the development of the station had an impact on the development of the local area, particularly the commercial centre of Hornsby, which developed around the station.

Even though it has undergone some alterations and additions, the building on Platform 4/5 is still a good example of a late Victorian railway station building with details and materials typical of this period and building type. It retains particularly high quality joinery to Platform 4. The buildings on Platforms 1 and 2/3 have undergone major alterations and additions but retain some of their original and early character, materials and details. The former barracks is a rare and unusual application of domestic Federation architectural style to a railway building. The substation is a good example of one of eight smaller suburban substations constructed for the electrification of the network in the 1920s and retains much of its original character even though it has been adapted for use as a warehouse. The 1928 signal box is a good example of a Type J1 electro mechanical power signal box, which allowed a large area to be controlled with fewer staff. While its relocation has detracted from its significance, it does retain a visual relationship with both the lines and platforms and its operation is still able to be interpreted. Hornsby Signal Box retains the key aesthetic characteristics of its type including wide balcony, chamfered corners with windows and gambrel roofs sheeted with fibro slates.
Date significance updated: 01 Sep 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Builder/Maker: New South Wales Department of Railways
Construction years: 1886-1928
Physical description: Platform 4/5 station building, type 4, third-class, (1884)
Platform 1 station building, type 18, (1910)
Platform 2/3 station building, type 18, (1910)
Platforms 1-5, (1884 - 1910, 2009)
Concourse, (1909 - early 2000)
Transfer Footbridge, (1910 - c2000)
Former Signal Box, type J1, (1928, relocated 2008)
Former substation, type B2, (1927)
Former Barracks, (1914)
Modern Buildings

CONTEXT
Hornsby Railway Station is a large railway precinct that extends from the Pacific Highway overbridge in the south to the Bridge Road overbridge in the north and is flanked by Jersey Road and Station Street on the west and George Street in the east. The station forms the core of the large suburban shopping centre of Hornsby and is an important transport hub as the junction between the North Shore and the Short North lines. In recent years, the station has undergone major redevelopments and expansion. The station comprises one roadside platform and two island platforms, linked by a large modern concourse at the southern end and a footbridge at the northern end. There is a large commuter car park east of the station, facing George Street and a bus interchange west of the station, facing Station Street. Immediately north of the station is the former Rail Yard, with numerous tracks and sidings, and lined by a series of buildings to the west along Jersey Street, including the former and current Signal Boxes, telephone exchange, former and current substations, and the former Rest House. North of the Bridge Road overbridge is a large modern maintenance depot.

PLATFORM 4/5 STATION BUILDING (1884)
External: The original building at Hornsby Station is located on Platforms 4/5. This was originally a third class standard roadside building facing Station Street, but with the recent construction of Platform 5, it is now located on an island platform. This building dates from 1884, and is a single storey brick building with a corrugated metal gabled roof. This building has many details typical of this period including rendered window elements (sills and head moulds), cross gables with wide bargeboards, gablet roof vents, chimneys with rendered corbelling and cast iron verandas. The exterior brickwork is now painted, though it was likely that it was originally face brickwork. There is evidence that the building was extended several times to the north and the south, though in a similar form with similar materials and simplified details. This building has a deep awning to Platform 4 with cast-iron decorative columns, which has been extended in modern materials but in a similar manner along the platform. This building retains good quality joinery, especially 4 panel doors with glazed fan & side lights.

Internal: Internally, this building retains much originally joinery, now painted, painted plastered walls, modern ceilings and concrete floors. In the storeroom there is an original ripple-iron ceiling. Some of the original configuration has been retained, with some areas of modifications for contemporary use. Most of the extant moveable items (three clocks and one safe) are located in this building

PLATFORM 1 STATION BUILDING (1910)
External: The station building on Platform 1 is an early 20th century station building, very similar in character and form to the building on Platform 2/3. The building on Platform 1 was designed as a roadside building. The building is single storey with a corrugated metal gable roof, with a curved ridge and is likely to have been originally face brick, though the buildings on Platform 1 and Platform 2/3 are both painted. The building has details typical of many standard Type A8-A10 station buildings of this period with some rendered details, such as window sills, painted joinery, including timber-framed double hung sash windows (some retaining their coloured glazing in their top sashes) and four panel doors. Awnings are narrow, little more than extensions of the eaves on large timber brackets, supported on rendered brackets set into the wall of the building. The roof form is considered to be unique, with Hornsby being the only known example of this type. Both the Platform 1 and 2/3 buildings have had major extensions to the south to provide open covered structures for the entire length of the platform, with a roof form to match the earlier structure.

Internal: The building has been modified to some extent, though it generally retains its painted plaster walls, painted joinery and some former fireplaces. Ceilings were originally ripple iron, since replaced with modern plasterboard and floors are modern, generally carpeted or concrete.

PLATFORM 2/3 STATION BUILDING (1910)
External: The Platform 2/3 station building is an early 20th century station building that is very similar in character and form to the building on Platform 1. The building is single storey with a corrugated metal gable roof, with a curved ridge and is likely to have been originally face brick, though it has been painted. The building has details typical of many Type A8-A10 station buildings of this period with some rendered details, such as window sills, painted joinery, including timber-framed double hung sash windows (some retaining their coloured glazing in their top sashes) and four panel doors. Awnings are narrow, little more than extensions of the eaves on large timber brackets, supported on rendered brackets set into the wall of the building. The roof form is considered to be unique, with Hornsby being the only known example of this type. Both this building and the building on Platform 1 have had major extensions to the south to provide open covered structures for the entire length of the platform, with a roof form to match the earlier structure.

Internal: This building has been modified to some extent, though it generally retains its painted plaster walls, painted joinery and some former fireplaces. Ceilings were originally ripple iron, since replaced with modern plasterboard and floors are modern, generally carpeted or concrete.

PLATFORMS 1, 2/3 & 4/5
Hornsby Railway Station has 5 platforms, running north-south. Platform 1 is a roadside platform, and Platforms 2/3 and 4/5 are an island platforms. Platform 5 was added to the western side of Platform 4 in 2009. Some of the platforms retain their original brick faces, but others have modern concrete faces. Platform 5 has concrete block faces. All platforms have standard SRA furniture, bins & fences. Each platform has extant pull-down indicator boards, which were a prominent feature of large urban and suburban stations.
Platform 1 (1930?): Platform originally brickwork laid in English bond with corbelled coping and rectangular weep holes. Short section at City end extended or replaced with modern concrete - possibly cast in situ. Coping has been cut back and gap reduction strip attached. Two sets of double steps in transverse arrangement were observed. Band of cement render along top of wall over old coping.
Platform 2 (1894): Platform originally brickwork laid in English bond with rectanglar weep holes. Section in middle largely rendered in cement. A short section shows evidence of projecting brick foundation. Some horizontal and transverse cracks are visible in the render. A long lever bay with steel posts and lintel has been infilled with brick. Coping has been cut back and gap reduction strip attached. Two sets of double steps in transverse arrangement were observed Timber garden beds have been installed under the footbridge trestles at Country end. Main platform surface is covered in beige tile with brick red tile detailing. The platform has all modern furniture; original doorsteps and furniture removed or covered.
Platform 3 (1894): Platform originally brickwork laid in English bond with rectangular weep holes. Evidence of previous corbelled brick coping that has since been cut back and gap reduction strip attached. Platform has been extended at least twice to the City end: with an open steel rail frame and concrete deck, and more recent open steel frame and concrete deck. A long lever bay appears to have been filled with brick, and a large galvanised steel services trough attached to the wall. Main platform surface is covered in beige tile with brick red tile detailing. Missing tiles are patched with coloured and uncoloured cement. Weepholes have been partially covered by ballast.
Platform 4 (1886): Platform originally brickwork, now largely rendered with cement. Straight coping has been raised in brick and cut back. Some horizontal and vertical cracking in cement render. Platform has been extended to Country end three times with: 1. Corbelled brickwork, which was later raised, 2. Steel rail posts and concrete panels cast in situ, and 3. Modern steel open frame and concrete deck. Original platform has two sets of double steps at transverse angle.
Platform 5 (2008): Platform originally constructed as a core filled concrete blockwork wall with cantilevered concrete deck. Tile surface designed to complement existing tilework.

CONCOURSE (1909 - early 2000s)
External: At the southern end of the station is a large modern concourse, providing a link across the railway line from Station Street to George Street and Florence Street with ticketing and information, staff facilities, and retail outlets. The substructure of the concourse is a light steel trussed frame, evident from the platforms below. From George and Station Streets, the concourse is a large structure with decorative banded concrete block walls, a wide gable roof with curved ridge line and featuring a clock tower at each end with a curved metal roof on an open steel frame over a tubular element containing the clock faces.

Internal: The concourse is a large space with a tiled floor, aluminium-framed glazing to the north and south walls, and an exposed painted steel roof structure. Facilities for staff and visitors are provided along a central spine, with through access between Station and George Streets to the south, a central secure access point for ticket control and stairs and lifts leading down each platform.

TRANSFER FOOTBRIDGE (1910 - early 2000s)
External: At the northern end of the station is a footbridge, providing access to all platforms. The substructure of the footbridge is a light steel trussed frame supporting a steel beam. Recent alterations include the addition of a corrugated metal roof, and coloured aluminium-framed glazing.

SIGNAL BOX (1928, relocated 2008)
External: The former signal box at Hornsby is a two storey brick and fibre-cement structure with a gambrel fibre-cement diamond-shaped slate roof. This building was originally located next to the former substation but was relocated closer to the station after it was made redundant and restored.

The ground level has brick walls with recessed panels with a sliding sash window with fanlight above and a reinforced concrete lintel. This level was designed to house the power supplies and the relays that perform the locking and interface with field functions. The upper level is lightweight construction, clad in fibre-cement sheeting and set back from the lower level on three sides to create a balcony with a steel pipe railing. The overhang of the roof forms a low awning over the balcony. Windows are timber-framed sliding-sash windows and form most of the front and end walls of this level. The front corners of this level are chamfered. This level was designed to accommodate the signalmen and the interlocking machines and diagrams to control functions and to advise the position of trains in the area of control.

Internal: The interior of the signal box was not inspected, though visual inspection through windows and discussion with railway staff indicate that it retains its original mechanisms, albeit no longer functioning.

FORMER SUB-STATION (1927)
External: Constructed in 1927, as one of eight smaller outer-suburban substations, the former Hornsby substation is an impressive two-storey brick building with a gambrel roof, with clerestory windows running the length of the building beneath a lantern structure. The side elevations feature recessed niches with corbelling at the top and steel-framed windows. The building has a lightweight wall at the southern end and the roof form does not terminate in a gambrel, indicating that the building was intended to be extended in the form of the original development. However, this did not occur and a lower gabled brick structure with parapet is adjoining the original building.

Internal: The substation was adapted for use as a store during the early 2000s, involving removal of all of the generators and associated machines. The works included painting of all internal surfaces, including the steel-framed roof trusses and the construction of some lightweight walls to form offices. The crane and its steel tracks and adjoining mezzanine (with a new steel stair leading to it) were retained.

FORMER BARRACKS (1914)
External: Near the north-western corner of the rail yard at Hornsby is the former Resthouse. This is a brick building with a corrugated metal gable roof with transverse off-centre gable and verandas on two sides. The building features several chimneys with decorative bands of roughcast plaster. The building has high quality external joinery, including open timberwork on the gable ends, chamfered veranda posts and double-hung sash windows, some with coloured glass in the nine-pane upper sashes. Each window has contrasting brick bullnose sills and tuck-pointed arches.

This building is used to provide offices and staff facilities for train crew and to provide additional facilities is surrounded on two sides by numerous demountable structures.

Internal: The interior was designed to provide accommodation and facilities for rail staff. As such, it contains a series of small rooms off a central corridor and several larger spaces, probably used as lounges and dining rooms. Currently, all internal walls and ceilings are painted plaster with timber boarded floors (vinyl covered) and painted joinery. This building was restored during the early 2000s. Much of its original configuration was retained during these works, with some minor alterations.

MODERN BUILDINGS
Located along Jersey Street are a series of additional buildings and demountable structures. These buildings include a new signal box, a face brick building, with rendered upper level, square windows and a tiled gable roof, a low face brick substation (c.1950s) with a gabled tiled roof and several other buildings, providing facilities for staff and depots.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Platform 4/5 station building (1884) - Good condition
Platform 1 station building (1910) - Good condition
Platform 2/3 station building (1910) - Good condition
Platforms 1-5 (1884 - 1910, 2009) - Good condition
Concourse (1909 - early 2000) - Good condition
Transfer Footbridge (1910 - c2000) - Good condition
Former Signal Box (1928, relocated 2008) - Very Good condition
Former Substation (1927) - Very Good condition
Former Barracks (1914) - Good condition
Modern Buildings - Not assessed
Date condition updated:08 Jul 09
Modifications and dates: 1990s: extensions to the electrification of the Northern line to Newcastle- some improvements to platform structures. Platforms and footbridges rebuilt with modern materials. Lifts have been installed on all platforms at the Sydney-end.
2014: Remove and replace roof on building located on platform 4 &5 including flashing materials, removal of redundant heat exchanger from roof cavity, replace and install insulation building blanket 50 mm thick, repaint fascias, replace and install fall arrester system.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Substation, Barracks, Signal Box

History

Historical notes: Hornsby Railway Station was opened on 17 September 1886. In November 1894, ‘Hornsby’ was renamed ‘Hornsby Junction’ (since the opening of the North Shore line in the early 1890s thus forming a junction at Hornsby), then finally being renamed ‘Hornsby’ in May 1900, the name it carries today.

The line from Strathfield was laid as ‘single line’ and continued on as a single line toward the Hawkesbury River, which was opened in 1887.

At Hornsby, a single brick faced platform was built on the down side of the line (which is still the down main line) and a brick station building was provided on the platform. The brick building is still in use today although there has been some extensions. A residence for the Station Master was built on the western side of the line at the Sydney-end of the platform. A small goods yard and goods shed were built on the down side of the line beyond the north end of the platform. A lengthy crossing loop was provided on the up side, parallel to the main line. The North Shore line junction (opened 1890) faced up trains on the up side of the line and formed a facing junction at the Sydney end of the platform.

Duplication of the line between Strathfield and Hornsby had been completed by 1892. By 1894, some alterations had been completed at Hornsby, associated with the duplication of the main line and the completion of the North Shore line. The original down main platform and building remained (as constructed) but a new island platform had been constructed on the up side of the line. The up main line passed though on one side of this platform, whilst the North Shore line used the back platform on the island platform. A footbridge spanned the tracks at the Strathfield-end of the platforms, with steps for access to the platforms. In addition, a larger goods yard, locomotive shed and depot, turntable, carriage shad, watering facilities, signals and interlocking were provided.

Over the next 50 years, Hornsby railway station, yard, buildings and general facilities were expanded.

The main line suburban electrification had reached Hornsby and the North Shore line by 1930 and a result, the electric car sheds at Hornsby had been built, an extra platform was provided at Hornsby station (then being platforms 1 – 4, with one island platform and two side platforms), and larger station buildings also provided. The locomotive depot, goods yard, sidings, signalling, and interlocking had been improved and enlarged.

A large ‘Power Signal Box’ was built at the down end of Hornsby station on the down side of the line and a 1500 volt DC substation for the suburban electrification system was constructed nearby.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accommodating railway employees-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Making gas /generating electricity-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Hornsby Station has local heritage significance under this criterion. The station was one of the original stops on the first section of the Short North line completed in 1886 and as such has historic association with the linkage of Sydney and Newcastle, which was a major event in the history of NSW railways. It also became the junction between the Short North line and the North Shore line when the latter opened in 1890 and so was a key regional station acting as a hub for the transport of passengers and goods, the change over of railway drivers and guards and the minor servicing of rolling stock. This importance was reinforced by the eventual size of the yard although the removal of much of the yard infrastructure in recent years has detracted from the site's ability to demonstrate its former status. The site has however, always been and remains a major passenger interchange and the number of platforms, station buildings and the detailed architectural style of the main station building on Platform 4 continues to demonstrate this historic role and the importance of the station. As a significant rail hub the development of the station had an impact on the development of the local area, particularly the commercial centre of Hornsby, which developed around the station.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Hornsby Railway Station Group has local heritage significance under this criterion.

The building on Platform 4/5 has been obscured by a large modern awning when viewed from the platforms and concourse but the historic character of the building is still visible when viewed from the street. Even though it has undergone some alterations and additions, it is still a good example of a late Victorian railway station building with details and materials typical of this period and building type. It retains particularly high quality joinery to Platform 4.

The buildings on Platforms 1 and 2/3 have undergone major alterations and additions but retain some of their original and early character, materials and details.

The former barracks is an unusual application of domestic Federation architectural style to a railway building.

The substation is a good example of one of the eight smaller suburban substations, and retains much of its original character even though it has been adapted for use as a warehouse.

The 1928 signal box is a good example of a Type J1 electro mechanical power signal box, which allowed a large area to be controlled with fewer staff. Its relocation from its original position in front of the sub-station to the Down end of Platform 4 has detracted from its significance as it does not retain its historic relationship to the lines or the platforms and is no longer operational. It does however, retain a visual relationship with both platforms and its operation is still able to be interpreted and its new position allows the potential for public access. Hornsby Signal Box retains the key aesthetic characteristics of its type including wide balcony, chamfered corners with windows and gambrel roofs sheeted with fibro slates.

While the yard may once have had significance as the only metropolitan yard to escape the layout impacts caused by the introduction of power-assisted signalling, the majority of the yard has been removed and is no longer able to demonstrate technical significance under this criterion.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Due to the high levels of disturbance on both sides of the railway corridor associated with recent work, the archaeological potential associated with the former rail yard is likely to be low. The site has limited research potential under this criterion.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
While Hornsby Railway Station Group may once have been a rare intact grouping of station and yard at a major junction of lines in the metro north network, recent changes to the site have reduced its integrity so that it no longer retains its significance under this criterion.

Barracks are becoming increasingly rare on the Sydney metro network, with the Hornsby rest house one of approximately 10 extant brick rest houses constructed between c1890-1920.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Hornsby Station has local heritage significance under this criterion. While it contains a range of railway buildings the removal of much of the yard, the heavy modifications to the two footbridges and the relocation of the signal box detract from the site's ability to be a good representative example of a large suburban rail yard and junction and reduces the group from a likely State ranking to Local.

The haunched beam footbridges are common, with thirty sets being built in the Sydney network between 1909 to 1935 and many remaining in use. The sets at Hornsby have been heavily modified and only the supporting structures remaining. The footbridge was identified as an item of little heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. However, the strategy recommended detailed physical analysis prior to any change to confirm the significance of the structure.

The barracks is representative of standard railway accomodation built for crew workers during the early 20th Century, however, the building has been altered and there are many better examples in other parts of NSW.

The remaining station buildings, platforms, substation, and the signal box are moderate to good representative examples of their individual item types and retain some of their spatial relationships with one another and the rail lines. Heavy modifications to the buildings on Platforms 1-3 have reduced any representative value they may have had.

The Hornsby signal box is representative of Type J1 signal boxes built in the Sydney metro network in the 1920s. Other examples of non-operational Type J1 signal boxes still exist at Homebush, Rockdale, Ashfield and the Flemington sidings.

The former substation, albeit no longer functioning as a substation, still retains its original form and character externally and is a representative example of the eight smaller suburban substations constructed across the network during the late 1920s.

The station buildings on Platforms 1 - 3 are brick island buildings from the early twentieth century with heavy modifications internally and externally and have had large continuous awnings added, which further detract from their significance.
Integrity/Intactness: The Hornsby Station has a moderate degree of integrity. The changes to the site including the loss of much of the former yard, the introduction of a large intrusive concourse and internal changes and the addition of large new roofs and awnings to the station buildings have detracted from the historic setting of the station group and its ability to provide a visual experience of the historic age of rail travel. Much of the infrastructure of the old yard including locomotive depot, water tank, water columns, lines, turntable and goods sheds have been removed, which detracts from the site's integrity. The station master's residence has also been removed. The footbridges at either end of the station platforms have been heavily modified and the signal box has been relocated although it still retains some association with the railway tracks and platforms. The original attached signal box on Platform 4 was removed many years ago and the platform station buildings have all been modified heavily internally although externally many of the original architectural details have survived, particularly the building on Platform 4. The 1909 overhead booking office has been removed.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage registerSRA s.170 Register    
Heritage studyHornsby Railway Station    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA889, SRA670 (sth f/b), SRA671 (nrth f/b), SRA80 (furniturState Rail Authority  No
S170 Heritage & Conservation Register Update2009 NSW Department of Commerce  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenBob Taaffe NSW Branch Line Signal Boxes in Branchline Modeller
WrittenC. C. Singleton The Short North. The Australian Railway Historical Society Bulletin. Various issues.
WrittenDavid Burke1995Making the Railways
WrittenDavid Sheedy Pty Ltd1999Inspection of Sites with potential heritage significance
WrittenJohn Forsyth Line Histories
WrittenR. Love & J. Moonie/State Rail Heritage Unit1998Heritage Survey of Hornsby Signal Box and Environs
WrittenR.T. Taaffe1990The Use and Selection of Materials in Railway Signal Box Construction 1912 - 1990 – University of Sydney PhD thesis
WrittenRay Love2009Historical Research for RailCorp s170 Update
MapSignal & Telegraph Branch NSW Railways1928Drawing X97 Hornsby Signal Box
WrittenState Rail Authority of New South Wales1995How and Why of Station Names. Fourth Edition
Management PlanState Rail Authority of NSW1986Trackfast Depot Hornsby- plans

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4801889


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