Moss Vale Railway Precinct | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Moss Vale Railway Precinct

Item details

Name of item: Moss Vale Railway Precinct
Other name/s: Sutton Forest
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Primary address: Lackey Street, Moss Vale, NSW 2577
Parish: Bong Bong
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee

Boundary:

The listing boundary crosses the line 20m south of the Argyle Street underbridge, follows the SRA property boundary on the west side to a point 20m beyond the footbridge over the main lines, then crossing the line, the entry road to the top of the brick retaining wall, then heading south incorporating the property boundary of the former Station Master’s residence (now privately owned), then following the SRA property boundary until it reaches 20m beyond the end of the underbridge. The former barracks and the surrounding former rail repair yard located on the north side of the station car park access road, Daly’s Way, are not within the listing boundary.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Lackey StreetMoss ValeWingecarribeeBong BongCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Moss Vale Railway Precinct is of state significance as one of NSW’s largest regional railway stations. For a short time Moss Vale served as the terminus of the Great Southern Line and at the time was one of only a few substantial railway buildings in NSW. The main wing of the 1867 station building is significant as one of the earliest railway buildings in NSW and is also one of the oldest buildings in Moss Vale. The elaborate Railway Refreshment Room dating from 1890 is significant as one of the largest in NSW remaining. The precinct presents a mostly intact group of Victorian station buildings and other structures that remain an important landmark in the town of Moss Vale. Moss Vale Railway Precinct is also significant for its use by a succession of NSW Governors from the 1880s until 1946. The station is rare as the only railway station in Australia that has been substantially designed and modified to accommodate regular Vice-regal use including the 1890 additions to the station building for a Governor’s Waiting Room and the unique platform and entry arrangement. Other significant features of the precinct (all dating from duplication of the line in 1915) include the decorative cantilevered awning to the platforms which was one of the first of its type in NSW, the booking Office, the two-storey signal box, the brick overbridge, and, the two steel Warren Truss footbridges. Originally the station featured an extensive yard, and while some elements of the southern goods yard are no longer extant, a jib crane, weighbridge and hut remain extant and are good representative examples of typical structures provided at many railway goods yards (Sheedy, 1988).

The two footbridges at Moss Vale were identified as items of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. Moss Vale Railway Station footbridges No's 1 and 2 are of high heritage significance because of their relatively intact Warren Truss deck support and steel trestle substructure. They contribute strongly to the Moss Vale station precinct which presents a relatively intact group of Victorian station structures together with extensive structures from the duplication of the line in 1915.
Date significance updated: 21 Oct 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Whitton (attributed)
Construction years: 1866-1915
Physical description: MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by RailCorp
Station Building - Type 3, second-class, one-storey, brick (1867, 1890)
Railway Refreshment Room - two-storey with single storey annexe (1890, 1919,1927)
Booking Office (1915)
Platforms
Platform Awnings (1915)
Footbridges
Overbridge

MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by ARTC
Signal Box - type 4, elevated adjacent to Lackey Street (1915)

OTHER ITEMS - Managed by ARTC
Jib crane
Weighbridge and Hut - adjacent to Argyle Street

LANDSCAPE
Pedestrian approach.
Brick walls and embankments
Forecourt
Perimeter fencing made from rails
General entry surrounds contains plantings which contribute to the entry setting. Some garden feature surrounds are old railing.

STATION BUILDING (1867, 1890)
The building is one storey with a range of rooms arranged laterally along Platform 1 (Up). Entry was through the rear into a booking hall that opened directly onto the platform. The building was extended in 1890 along the Up platform in a similar style with the Governor’s Waiting Room, ladies and gentlemen’s waiting rooms and store rooms with detached men’s toilet.

Walls are of dark red face brick except along the platform side and they are capped by a coved sandstone cornice. The hipped slate roof is in two parts, the southern wing above the gentlemen's toilets having a glazed and louvered clerestory lantern. The platform corrugated awning roof is supported on cantilevered steel brackets carrying downpipes with a roof to the road being similar but supported by two timber posts at the ends. The timber framed windows and doors are typical of a mid-Victorian pattern and there are a series of brick chimneys having sandstone bases and cappings. Some early ‘jelly bean’ glazing to windows. There are several signs attached to the building that may date to the late 19th century remaining on the building. Older style lantern light fitting to front façade. Railway (older style) fencing to both sides of station building. Door step grates present to buildings from platform side. SRA locks in doors. Original door knobs/handles present. Station seems to be painted in ESE 010 (R52) scheme.

Most rooms appear to retain their original finishes of timber floors, painted plaster walls and ceilings and moulded timber joinery to window and door architraves, picture rails and/or chair rails and skirtings. Subsequent changes have been relatively minor and the building remains essentially as completed in 1890. The waiting room contains fireplace, fitted historic seats, patterned ceiling with ornate ceiling rose and deep cornice/architrave, and commemorative plaque installed 1987. Modern strip lighting present. Female bathrooms modern.

RAILWAY REFRESHMENT ROOM (1890, 1919, 1927)
A two storey brick building, the wing facing Platform No.1 having a painted cream brick finish with the roof behind a parapet and a single storey annex to the southern end similarly arranged. The wing facing Platform No.2 is of lower overall height in a dark brown face brick with single storey section generally comprising the former kitchen area. There are cantilevered iron platform awnings to both sides.

The main west facade is heavily ornamented with brick pilasters and stucco moulded string courses, cornices and pedimented gables. The hipped roof is of corrugated iron (the main wing originally slated) dominated by a number of large brick chimneys. Windows and doors are typical of late Victorian stylistic detailing. A painted brick finish under Platform 1 awning matches that of the adjoining Station Building.

The rear single storey bar and kitchen alterations occurred in 1919. The eastern two storey wing was added in 1927. Small alterations to bars, dining room and kitchen occurred from 1919 to 1967.

The former main Refreshment Room is the dominant ground floor space decorated by plastered neo classic pilasters, coffered and ornamented timber boarded ceilings and heavily moulded and pedimented door joinery. At the rear of the other large space is the tiled former kitchen having a clerestory ceiling light and there are a series of subsidiary service rooms and former small refreshment bars and rooms now with either plaster, timber or composition board ceilings and plastered walls. There are cellars under the rear wing.

The first floor consists of 7 bedrooms, bathroom, linen room, Governor’s Private Room and Governors Dining Room with private stair access from the platform and from the rear. The bedrooms generally have timber floors and walls and ceilings lined with asbestos cement panels.

BOOKING OFFICE (1915)
A single storey dark red face brick gabled building having awnings both sides cantilevered by steel curved brackets. It is arranged at right angles to the platforms and consists of two rooms for the Booking and Parcels Office. The door and window joinery is typical of Federation style detailing. The roof is sheeted in corrugated iron. The interior appears largely altered and consists of timber floors, painted plaster walls and painted composition panelled ceilings. The building features an internal courtyard garden space. While the building is based on a standard design, it has a unique siting arrangement on an unusually wide island platform linked by covered walkways.

PLATFORMS
The brick Up Platform (1) was originally constructed in 1867 and lengthened in 1882. Platform originally brickwork, laid in English bond, with a battered profile and sandstone coping. Platform has been extended twice to Country end in brickwork with corbelled coping and raised in concrete. Lever Bay filled in with brick. The brick Down Platform (2) was constructed in 1914. Platform originally brickwork, laid in English bond, with corbelled coping and weepholes. Some sections have been rendered in cement. Coping may be pulling away from deck as evidenced by gaps. Brickwork coping at Country end ramp chipped and patched. There is also a dock platform located behind platform 1, originally brickwork, laid in English bond, with corbelled coping and weepholes. No longer in use. Coping chipped. Modern seating, benches and light poles on platform. Remnant siding at end of platform contains decaying timber buffer stop.

PLATFORM AWNINGS (1915)
Along Platform 2 is a curved steel and timber platform awning following the curvature of the railway line. The structure is of R.S.J. posts and curved steel brackets carrying a skillion corrugated iron roof. The wall is formed by vertical 'v' jointed painted timber boards decorated above walkways. Timber seats are built into the bays at a number of places. The awnings are simple and elegant structures of an uncommon type and were probably purpose designed for the location. Little change has been made to the public areas. However staff buildings and works necessary for steam train operation have been removed since the 1930s.

FOOTBRIDGES (1915)
The Up side footbridge and Argyle Street station footbridge are both steel riveted through Warren truss footbridges on angle iron trestles and channel iron stair stringers.

OVERBRIDGE (1915)
Brick overbridge with steel girders. Possibly jack-arch construction, with brick wing abutments, central brick pier and brick balustrades. Bitumen surface.

SIGNAL BOX (1915)
A two-storey structure with hipped roof and windows extending around three sides on the upper level to give clear vision. Access is via an external ladder and landing with toilet on the landing. The lower section has windows arranged symmetrically.

JIB CRANE, WEIGHBRIDGE, AND WEIGHBRIDGE HUT (OFFICE)
The weighbridge hut is a small timber weatherboard building. The 20 ton weighbridge was manufactured by Hawke & Company, probably in c1940s or 1950s. The jib crane was provided in c1884.

MOVABLE
All station signage, in situ and in storage
“Moss Vale – Junction for Wollongong” sign in storage
Heritage-style lamp posts on platform and in car park and garden
Metal exterior vent hoods
Three single timber rollover indicator boards - two used for trains and one used for coaches (still in use) – all three with clock faces and foot pedals.
Original and early door and window hardware (locks, handles, sash locks and lifts etc)
Terracotta and concrete planter pots on platform
Framed artworks and prints
Large timber-framed mirror attached to chimney in waiting room
Etched glass panels in clerestory windows
Wrought iron and timber platform benches in garden
Plaque on sandstone plinth in garden – “125 anniversary of Moss Vale Railway Station – 2 December 1992”
Plaque –Governors dining room restoration – opened 14 May 1988.
Fitted and freestanding timber platform benches
Green 5-ton jib crane on concrete plinth on yard
Cast iron bubbler with ribbed pedestal on concrete plinth
Small timber storage and form boxes on platform
Remnant iron rail and timber sleeper retaining wall
C1950s green timber and laminex fitted kitchen benches and cupboards
C1950s-1960s plywood fitted benches
Original and early light fittings, chains and timber mounting blocks
Painted wall signage “To rooms 11 – 18” and painted hand
Timber door hoods / shelves
C1940s ceramic toilets and cisterns
Corner ceramic basin, broken – “Tylors London and Sydney – Bega”
Enamelled bathtub
A large number of joinery items such as panelled partitions, doors and cupboard glazed doors, window sashes (one with a fanlight operator), architraves and skirting boards are stored in one of the rooms.
Timber fire surrounds, cast iron grates and hearths
Marble fire surround and fender, cast iron grate and glazed hearth tiles
Early painted and wallpapers finishes on interior walls
Several steel platform trolleys
Fitted timber cupboards and overhead shelves
All early wall tiles, pale yellow, in Refreshment Room kitchen and white elsewhere
Early sheeted timber cold room door, painted green with cast iron hinges and locking mechanism
Fitted timber benches, kitchens sink and cupboards in kitchen
Early switches on timber mounting blocks
Timber screen door in storage
Metal horn attached to canopy bracket
Stained glass window panels, likely artist Ashwins and Co
Modern steel history panels in car park
Wrought iron boundary corridor railing / fencing
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Station Building and RRR - very good condition
Crane - good
Argyle Street Station Footbridge - good
Up Side Footbridge - moderate
Date condition updated:04 May 07
Modifications and dates: c1990 - Footbridge stairway refurbished
C.2006 Barracks included in large parcel of vacant railway sold for re-development
N.d. - SM’s Residence remains but is now in private ownership.
2010 - Barracks demolished
c2013: New station car park constructed over the site of the former barracks (outside listing curtilage), including construction of vehicle and pedestrian access to the car park off Daleys Way and the installation of road and footpath lighting along the footpath from the new car park to Moss Vale Station.
2014: Station Footbridge maintenance - including repainting; new retaining wall/footing down side ramp; replace broken/rotten treads and posts; steel work repairs.
c2014: Station refresh works including minor repairs; painting; garden maintenance; toilet refurbishment; deep cleaning; lighting improvements.
Current use: Operational passenger station
Former use: Signal box used for train control, jib crane and weighbridge part of operational railway goods yard until the 1980s.

History

Historical notes: Following the completion of the first railway from Sydney to Parramatta Junction in 1855, proposals for the first railways to the rest of NSW were driven by pastoral communities seeking improved transport for their produce from the inland centres such as Goulburn, Bathurst, Singleton and Muswellbrook. When John Whitton arrived in Sydney in 1856 to take up his position as Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, his job was to plan the extensions which would take the infant railway, which at the was just twenty-one miles in length, into the interior of Australia (Lee, 2000, p98).

Plans for a railway line through the Moss Vale district can be traced to as early as August 1846 but it wasn’t until 1860 that definite plans were made to extend the Great Southern Line to Picton, with an extension to Goulburn. The station, originally called Sutton Forest, opened in 1867 and was for a time the only public building in the settlement and as such housed the post office for several years. Sutton Forest was the terminus until the line to Marulan was opened on 6th August, 1868. Between 1875 and 1877, the name ‘Moss Vale’ gradually gained acceptance and was officially adopted by 1877 and possibly as early as 1876 (Sheedy, 1988; Forsyth, 1989).

The design of the Georgian style station building at Moss Vale is attributed to Whitton and was completed for the opening of the line in 1867. It was a substantial if standard type of building when originally constructed. Other notable early stations attributed to Whitton include Mittagong, Moss Vale, Scone, Muswellbrook, Penrith (No.3 platform), Bowenfels and Mount Victoria. These early buildings borrow heavily from Whitton's design experience in England and increasingly move from Georgian to Victorian architectural styles and represent Whitton’s obstinate faith in British railway standards and workmanship which continued throughout his career (Lee, 2000).

The station was completed at a time when the Southern Highlands was becoming a popular summer retreat for Sydney people. Moss Vale was used as a regular holiday destination by successive Governors’ of NSW, a tradition that continued from the late 1860s until 1946. The Earl of Belmore leased Throsby Park at Moss Vale from 1868 to 1871, Sir Hercules Robinson visited the area privately and Lord Augustus Loftus preferred the climate of Sutton Forest to what he described as the "unpleasant surroundings of Government House during the summer season". He persuaded the Government to purchase the property ‘Prospect’ from RP Richardson (of Richardson and Wrench) as a Government country residence, later renamed Hill View (Sheedy, 1988).

Successive governors travelled to the district using the Vice regal railway coach and alighted at Moss Vale. Baron Carrington, Governor from 1885 to 1891, requested that the refreshment rooms be moved from Mittagong to Moss Vale, with the new RRR at Moss Vale constructed in 1890. Later, the Governor’s Waiting Room and a suite of rooms for the Governor were provided on the first floor of the refreshment room building at Moss Vale and a shed was constructed for the State car in the 1890s.

Other early additions or changes to the site included the erection of stockyards (1881), lengthening of the platform (1882), installation of a 5 tonne yard crane (1884), the introduction of electric lighting and new water supply (1890), the transfer of water tanks from Bong Bong and a water column from Mittagong (1894), erection of a turntable (1898), and a second bridge over Argyle Street (1898) (Forsyth, 1989; Sheedy, 1988).

Duplication of the Main South Line was gradually extended northwards from Goulburn with the Bowral to Werai Section being completed on 14th November, 1915. This duplication necessitated extensive remodelling of Moss Vale Station including the road closure from Argyle Street, removal of the goods and carriage sheds and the subsequent rearrangement of the platform layout (which can still be seen today). Following duplication works, special arrangements were made to allow Governor Strickland’s invalid daughter to be transported via road access direct to the platform. This resulted in the present arrangement of a wide island platform connected by road and pedestrian overbridges (Sheedy, 1988).

The new island platform resulted in the slews noticeable at the outer ends of the yard as the Up line had to be brought to the original platform. A new truss bridge was also erected on the slew over Argyle Road in 1914 for the duplication works, the hill on the Down side at the station was cut back to take the Down main, Down refuge loop, goods siding and goods yard and a retaining wall supported the Station Master's residence (Sheedy, 1988).

As a result of line duplication and increased patronage a rear single storey bar and kitchen alterations and additions were undertaken to the RRR in 1919. In 1927 the Eastern two-storey accommodation wing was built and additional bar and other services added including converting the Governor's Private Room into public bedrooms and the Governor's Dining Room into a Public Sitting Room. This probably arose due to increased traffic generated by an influx of tourists to the area, increase in general rail traffic, opening of the Federal line and anticipation of the coastal rail link proceeding (Sheedy, 1988).

Other later additions at Moss Vale included a boiler to heat foot warmers (1900), new locomotive watering facilities (1915), a goods shed, carriage shed and signal box (all 1915), and a new Station Master’s residence (1920). The yard was remodelled at the Sydney end in anticipation of the completion of the branch line from Unanderra which although commenced in 1924 was not opened until 21st August, 1932 (Forsyth, 2009).

With the introduction of 57 class engines from the 1920s, alterations were made to the yard which meant that the 75 foot turntable at the Up side of the yard was supplemented by a triangle to turn the large locomotives in the branch line fork (Sheedy, 1988).

The RRR was closed in 1962 and since 1967 the building appears to have been given over to trades use on the ground floor and closed up on the first floor. The Berrima District Railway Modeller's Club has also leased the western first floor wing and the club carrying out renovations.

In 2008, a section of the southern goods yard was incorporated into the surrounding Leighton Gardens and Diamond Jubilee Park and the weighbridge hut repaired.

The station remains an operational passenger station with regular passenger services.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Migration-Activities and processes associated with the resettling of people from one place to another (international, interstate, intrastate) and the impacts of such movements Migrants as railway promoters and managers-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Making railway journeys-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accommodating passengers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping inland settlements-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Railway administration-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Evolution of design in railway engineering and architecture-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Moving people to events and leisure activities-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Significant railway identities-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Moss Vale Railway Precinct is of historic significance as one of NSW’s earliest and most significant regional railway stations. For a short time Moss Vale served as the terminus of the Great Southern Line and at the time was one of only a few substantial railway buildings in NSW. The main wing of the 1867 station building is significant as one of the earliest railway buildings in NSW and is also one of the oldest buildings in Moss Vale. The elaborate Railway Refreshment Room dating from 1890 is significant as one of the largest in NSW remaining.

Moss Vale was the favoured holiday destination for a succession of NSW Governors from the 1880s until 1946 and Moss Vale Railway Precinct is significant for its use by many of NSW Governors during this period. The station is rare as the only railway station in Australia that has been substantially designed to accommodate regular Vice-regal use including the 1890 additions to the station building for a Governor’s Waiting Room.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Moss Vale Railway Precinct is significant for its association with various Governors of NSW from the late 19th century until the 1940s. The 1867 station building is associated with Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, John Whitton (known as ‘father of the Railways’), however, later modifications have altered the original design and form of the building, and better examples such as Picton demonstrate Whitton’s design influence during the earliest period of railway construction in NSW.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Moss Vale Railway Precinct has aesthetic significance as a large and grand collection of Victorian station buildings that are an important landmark in the town of Moss Vale. The buildings and precinct reflect the main phases of railway development in NSW from the 1860s to the 1930s.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The site is of social significance to the local community on account of its lengthy association for providing an important source of employment, trade and social interaction for the local area. The site is significant for its ability to contribute to the local community’s sense of place, is a distinctive feature of the daily life of many community members, and provides a connection to the local community’s past. The railway station and yard are closely linked to the earliest development of Moss Vale (formerly Sutton Forrest) and remain a significant feature within the town.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Moss Vale Railway Precinct has research significance for its ability to reveal how the station evolved for Vice-regal use.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Moss Vale Railway Precinct is rare as the only railway station in Australia that has been substantially designed to accommodate regular Vice-regal use including the 1890 additions to the station building for a Governor’s Waiting Room. The entry arrangement to the station is also unique.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The place has representative significance for its collection of railway structures and other related items that collectively demonstrate widespread 19th and early 20th century railway customs, activities and design in NSW, and are representative of similar items that are found in many other railway sites across the state. Originally the station featured an extensive yard, and while some elements are no longer extant, the surviving examples including the jib crane, weighbridge and hut are all good examples of their type. Other representative items all dating from duplication of the line in 1915 include the decorative cantilevered awning to the platforms which was one of the first of its type in NSW, booking office, the two-storey signal box, the brick overbridge and the two steel Warren Truss footbridges.

The two footbridges at Moss Vale were identified as items of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. Moss Vale Railway Station footbridges No's 1 and 2 are of high heritage significance because of their relatively intact Warren Truss deck support and steel trestle substructure. They contribute strongly to the Moss Vale station precinct which presents a relatively intact group of Victorian station structures together with extensive structures from the duplication of the line in 1915.
Integrity/Intactness: The station buildings have a high level of integrity. Despite extensive modifications and additions, the Moss Vale station and yard has retained many significant features from the late 19th century and early 20th century and retains a high level of integrity.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA253State Rail Authority  No
S170 Register Update Project2009 ARTC/ ORH  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenDavid Sheedy1988Moss Vale station: conservation & management plan
WrittenJ.H. Forsyth1989Stations & Tracks: volume 2: Main Southern Line Granville Junction to Albury
WrittenJ.M. Cottee2004Stations on the track: selected New South Wales country railway stations
WrittenJCIS Consultants2013STATEMENT OF HERITAGE IMPACT FOR THE PROPOSED MOSS VALE STATION COMMUTER CAR PARK
WrittenMcKillop, R2009NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4806253


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