Goulburn Railway Precinct | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Goulburn Railway Precinct

Item details

Name of item: Goulburn Railway Precinct
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Workshop
Primary address: Sloane Street, Goulburn, NSW 2580
Parish: Goulburn
County: Argyle
Local govt. area: Goulburn Mulwaree

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by Sloane Street to the west, Goldsmith St crossing to the north including the gatekeeper's residence, Blackshaw Rd to the east, then extending along the property boundary to Mundy St, crossing the tracks to Sloane Street and including the roundhouse and workshop.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Sloane StreetGoulburnGoulburn MulwareeGoulburnArgylePrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Goulburn railway precinct is of state significance as one of the earliest principal rail locations in NSW and has had continuous use as a major railway centre since the 1860s. The main station building (1869) is significant as the earliest 'first class' station building constructed in NSW. The railway station is a prominent public building in Goulburn that, along with other significant railway structures in the adjacent yard, is closely associated with the development of Goulburn in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The major railway buildings and other structures at Goulburn are integral to the history and identity of a town which has relied to a great extent on the railways for its growth and development for a large part of its history, with the railway being the major employer for much of Goulburn's history.

Other significant items within the Goulburn railway precinct include the former Station Master's residence (1869), the former Gatekeeper's residence on Blackshaw Road (c1869), the c1891 barracks, the former carriage and per way workshops (part of which remain in private ownership), and the former administrative headquarters on Sloane Street.

The Goulburn barracks building is an excellent representative example of 1890s railway barracks construction, is one of the oldest extant railway barracks in NSW, and is associated with an important historical phase in the history of NSW: the rapid development of the NSW railway network in the late 19th century. It is important as an example of a standard 19th century railway design, and along with the two residences at Goulburn, is significant as a group that collectively demonstrate the custom of providing accommodation for railway staff.

The footbridge was identified as an item of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. The northern Goulburn Station footbridge is one of only a few surviving old rail truss footbridges, and is a good example of the effects of the economic constraints of the 1890s. Even though it is altered, the north station footbridge makes a strong contribution to the heritage values of the overall Goulburn Station precinct.
Date significance updated: 21 Oct 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: William Mason
Builder/Maker: J. Taylor
Construction years: 1868-1915
Physical description: MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by RailCorp
Station building - Platform 1, type 5, first class (1869)
Station building and Refreshment Rooms - Platform 2/3, type 11, (1915)
Footbridge (North) (1894)
Platforms (1869, 1915)
Movable

MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by ARTC
Station Master's residence - 1/71 Sloane St, type 4, 2 storey brick (1869)
Gatekeeper's residence - 1 Blackshaw Rd, type 1, brick and stone (1869)
Railway barracks - off Blackshaw Rd, standard barracks (c1891)
Admin offices for locomotive supervisor (former police barracks) Sloane Street (1912) (now part of privately owned Bowling Club)
Goods shed - Sloane St, through shed 146' x 45' corrugated iron (c.1870s)
Locomotive straight shed - located near roundhouse, built in Wellington (1880), transferred to Goulburn (1930)
Roundhouse - brick and corrugated iron (1918)
Signal box - Sloane St, brick, two-storey (c.1970)
Footbridge (South) (1899)

OTHER ITEMS - Managed by ARTC
Turntable - 90 foot electrically operated turntable at roundhouse
Water tank - near station
Water column - platform 2 south end
Workshops - Perway and Carriage Workshops (c.1881) (part of which remain in private ownership)


CONTEXT
The Goulburn Railway Precinct consists of a large and complex group of buildings and other structures, most of which are no longer used for their original purpose (the 1869 station building being the main exception).

STATION BUILDING (1869)
The main Station Building is a grand Victorian Italianate building constructed of painted brick (originally facebrick) and features stone quoin detailing to corners, and stone detailing to cornice and gable ends. The building presents as a symmetrical elevation with corrugated iron gabled roof with corbelled chimneys and two transverse gable ends. The two gabled ends feature bay windows. There are two lower parapet wings to either end of the building. Fenestration includes arched windows with decorative stone surrounds. The building features a roadside inset verandah of three stone arches, which has been extended with a skillion verandah supported on decorative columns.

The building originally comprised a series of rooms including a telegraph office, combined parcels and lamp room, Station Master’s office, booking office, refreshment room (including a separate entry for women), a general waiting room, ladies waiting room, and an attached toilet block wing.

The building originally featured a bell tower (removed at an unknown date). In 1884, the building was extended with a refreshment room and again extended in c.1900 to include a larger parcels office and a large attached men’s toilet block wing. In 1901 a new awning was constructed to span the length of the refreshment room, original station building, and new parcels office extension. The platform awning is supported on curved steel brackets.

STATION BUILDING (1915)
The Platform 2/3 building features a long brick island platform building with attached two-storey refreshment rooms. The buildings are constructed of face brick with rendered architraves, sills and brackets. The buildings feature a gabled corrugated iron roof with clerestory roof to the refreshment rooms, decorative gable ends and brick corbelled chimneys. The roof extends to form a platform awning which spans the length of both structures, and is supported on double curved cast iron brackets upon rendered brackets. The string course is of two small projecting rendered bands, with the rows of brick between painted to give the impression of a deep rendered string.

The station building originally comprised of a parcels office, booking office, general waiting room, ladies room and lavatory. The refreshment room originally comprised of a main refreshments room area with bar and counter, a sitting room, kitchen, storeroom and pantry, and 5 bedrooms and a bathroom on the second floor.

Adjacent to the refreshment room is a detached men’s toilet block, which is brick and features a corrugated hipped roof and similar detailing to the station building.

PLATFORMS (1915, 1869)
The platforms are brick faced with concrete surface. Platform 1 (1869): Platform wall constructed of brick with cement rendered facing. Height has been raised with concrete deck throughout. Wall and coping sound. Coping has been trimmed back. Platform 2 (1915): Platform wall comprises of brick facing with concrete deck. Wall is sound with single long longitudinal crack along a mortar plane. Deck is good. Coping face trimmed back.

SITE FEATURES
Platform 1
- Timber dog box extant end of platform
- Museum with signalling objects
- Waiting Room – timber mantle and cast iron surrounds (x3)
- Some original timber joinery and doors
- Some original cast iron decorative frames with brackets (for early signage)
- Spherical light finishes underneath platform awning
- ‘Platform 1’ tin signs affixed to underside of awning along entire platform
- Old signage box affixed to wall (indicator boards indicating next train service)
- Honour Roll x 2 with small trophy cabinet display
Platform 2
- Original Wayfinding Signage i.e. Ladies, Waiting Room, Mens
- Platform 2 sign
- Original (faded) Refreshment Room window panes (approx. 6)
- Gooseneck lighting
- Maroon bubbler with elevated plinth
- Original Cedar Panelling in Refreshment Room - 6.2/2.3, (AW01)
- Original timber Door panels in Refreshment Room - 2.1 high, (AD06)
- Plaster moulding detailing on upper panelling of RRR interiors
- Bakelite switches upstairs
- Range hood still extant in RRR kitchen. Original cast iron cooker likely behind wooden sheeting.
- Early timber partitions and door frames in men’s toilets
- Original waiting room benches in situ in waiting room
- Remnants of brick ‘oven’ near water column to heat foot warmers (next to end platform – Brick Yard Master Hut)
Other
- Some interpretation by Council in front garden

STATION MASTER’S RESIDENCE (1869) - ARTC
Two-storey, Victorian Gothic Station Master’s residence is a unique design in the railway system. Constructed of masonry, the building featured stone quoins, steep gable roofs and decorative barges and finials, and internally comprised of dining, sitting, and breakfast rooms, a kitchen, and bathroom, and four bedrooms on the second floor.

BARRACKS (c1891) - ARTC
The barracks building is a standard rectangular brick structure with a corrugated iron (steel) gabled roof and a veranda with corrugated fibro roof supported on timber posts. There are several minor architectural features of note, including the entrance to the mess room which projects out from the main structure, decorative gables, decorative circular brickwork vents, a large brick chimney and doors and windows with fanned brickwork arches.

NORTH FOOTBRIDGE (1894) - ARTC
The footbridge joins the platforms. The structure is a through Warren truss made from old rails. New stairs built in 1994 with some general refurbishment.

SOUTH FOOTBRIDGE (1899) - ARTC
The footbridge provides public access across the railway. The structure is a through Warren truss.

LANDSCAPE
Forecourt and plantings to Sloane St.

MOVABLE HERITAGE
NSW Railway heritage listed sites contain significant collections of stored movable railway heritage, including furniture, signs, operational objects, ex-booking office and ticketing objects, paper records, clocks, memorabilia, indicator boards and artwork. Individually, these objects are important components of the history of each site. Together, they form a large and diverse collection of movable objects across the NSW rail network. Sydney Trains maintains a database of movable heritage. For up-to-date information on all movable heritage items at this site, contact the Sydney Trains heritage team.

Key items at this station include but are not limited to:

Train controller’s desk timber, 2.0/1.1/1.6, (TA06) area manager’s office
2 x Seth Thomas Clocks both in working order (#1302 Area Managers Office, #1650 NSW TrainLink booking office).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
All buildings are generally in good condition.
Platforms - Good (2015)
Date condition updated:25 Nov 09
Modifications and dates: There have been extensive modifications to the station building and to various items within the yard.

Barracks: The interior of the barracks building features a false ceiling (probably installed soon after construction of the building), with the false ceiling obscuring a cedar-panelled ceiling supported by partly visible carved wooden posts. In 2009, approval was given to remove the ceiling and most partition walls to convert the building for use as an exhibition space and community meeting place. The common areas of the building are located at the western end of the barracks, with the mess room consisting of a rectangular space with entrance doors to the verandas on each side. This room has at some point been partitioned into two rooms; however the partition has been removed (at an unknown date) to open up the room. The kitchen was renovated at a later stage with the attendant’s room removed and a hot water heater installed. An extension was added to the western side of the barracks building in the c1960s to provide more recreational space for railway employees. The additional room is accessed through a sliding door from the kitchen. A small detached brick structure is located at the eastern end of the barracks with a covered walkway linking the main building and the detached structure. The additional structure has been converted for use as a toilet but is thought to have originally been used as a laundry (Berendt & Ward, 2008).
Current use: Operational railway station and yard; some former railway buildings now used for community purposes; roundhouse occupied by rail heritage group
Former use: Railway station, locomotive depot, and goods yard

History

Historical notes: The Goulburn Railway Precinct is located on the Main South Line.

Following the completion of the first railway from Sydney to Parramatta Junction in 1855, proposals for the first railways to the rest of NSW were driven by rural constituents seeking improved transport for primary produce from the inland centres of Goulburn, Bathurst, Singleton and Muswellbrook. When John Whitton arrived in Sydney in December 1856 to take up his position as Engineer-in-Chief of the NSW Railways, "he understood his job was to plan the extensions which would take the infant railway into the interior of Australia. At that time only the railway from Sydney to Liverpool was open, just twenty-one miles (34km) in length". It wasn’t until 1860 that definite plans were made to extend the Great Southern Line to Picton, with an extension to Goulburn (Lee, 2000, p98).

Almost a decade later, the single line from Marulan to Goulburn opened on 27 May 1869 (Forsyth, 2009). The railway station was also officially opened on 27 May 1869 with the Sydney Morning Herald reporting that the first train between Sydney and Goulburn departed Sydney at five minutes past eight in the morning and arrived in Goulburn at five minutes to four, travelling at a maximum speed of 35mph (Sydney Morning Herald quoted in Forsyth, 1989).

The original layout at Goulburn included a platform with horse and carriage docks at each end, with the platform located on the Up (west) side of the original loop. In 1883 an additional 42-metre long platform was erected for the opening of the Bombala line in the following year (Forsyth, 1989; Cottee, 2004).

The tender for construction of the station building was awarded to a Mr. J. Taylor on 7 May 1868 (Forsyth, 1989). The main regional centres of NSW received significant structures adorned with special features to signify the importance of the town. William Mason, Engineer for Existing Lines, was primarily responsible for designing these fine structures in classic Victorian Italianate style, commencing with Goulburn, then Newcastle and Maitland (Cottee, 2004).

Other early or original structures at Goulburn included the goods shed (1868), the carriage shed (1869), engine shed (1869), a coal stage, water pump, 15.2m turntable, and the Station Master’s residence (1870) (Forsyth, 1989).

In 1884 a refreshment room was added to the main station building, and the station building was extended in c1900 to include a larger parcels office and a large attached men’s toilet block wing. In 1901 a new awning was constructed to span the length of the refreshment room, original station building, and new parcels office extension. In 1915 a new brick island platform was constructed, and an additional station building and refreshment room building provided.

Other early additions and changes to the railway precinct at Goulburn included the construction of a Gatekeeper's residence at the Mundy Street crossing in 1877, the addition of a Per way Inspector’s office and two water tanks and the demolition of the brick carriage shed (in 1884), erection of a 20-tonnne cart weighbridge (1892), construction of footbridges (in 1894 and 1899), and the conversion of the former police barracks for use as office accommodation (1912). Many other additions and changes were made to the station building and yard in the 20th century, including the construction of a roundhouse in 1918 (Forsyth, 1989).

The line was duplicated on 21 October 1914.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Communication-Activities relating to the creation and conveyance of information Signalling and safe working-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods Railway Workshops-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Servicing the pastoral industry-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Making railway journeys-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Maintaining the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Transport of goods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accommodating railway employees-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Servicing and accommodating passengers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping inland settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Provision of railway water supplies-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Rail heritage volunteers-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Apprenticeships and cadetships-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Railway administration-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Evolution of design in railway engineering and architecture-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Railway tourism-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Significant railway identities-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Goulburn was one of the earliest major railway centres in NSW and is therefore associated with the earliest development of railway infrastructure in regional NSW in the 1860s. The construction of the line to Goulburn was a major milestone in the development of the railways during the 19th Century and opened up the pastoral industry in this region to new markets. The 1860s station building is significant as one of the earliest first class buildings constructed in NSW, indicating the importance of Goulburn as a major railway centre in the state. The barracks building is one of the earliest extant buildings of its type constructed in NSW, and along with the two railway residences at Goulburn, is significant as a group that collectively demonstrate the custom of providing designated accommodation for railway staff. The site is significant for its collection of buildings form various periods, demonstrating continuous railway activity on the site for almost 150 years
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The site is associated with John Whitton (‘Father of the NSW Railways’), through his achievement in completing the trunk lines to Goulburn. The line from Picton to Goulburn via Thirlmere is one of Whitton’s greatest triumphs throughout his career.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The 1860s station building is a significant and imposing landmark in Goulburn which demonstrates a high level of aesthetic significance. The building is a fine example of a first-class Victorian Italianate railway building, demonstrating the importance of railway development during the earliest period of railway construction. Aspects of the main buildings of special note are the original interiors including the interior of the refreshment room.

The 1915 station building and railway refreshment rooms are significant for demonstrating a variation on a standard building type employed throughout NSW, adapted to accommodate the high level of traffic at Goulburn railway station.

Several other items within the precinct are excellent examples of their type and demonstrate technical and/or aesthetic significance, particularly the Station Master's and Gatekeeper’s residences which are good examples of Victorian Gothic style domestic buildings. The roundhouse is of significance as a good example of a large scale industrial railway structure retaining much of its original fabric and form. The railway barracks building at Goulburn is aesthetically significant as an example of late 19th century standard railway architecture.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The major railway buildings at Goulburn are integral to the history and identity of the town which has relied on the railways to a large extent for its growth and prosperity, particularly in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The depot, in particular, employed a large number of people, many of whom still live in or near Goulburn.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The site has research significance as Goulburn once contained the most comprehensive group or railway buildings outside Sydney, representing most stages of railway development and technology. Much of this infrastructure remains. The roundhouse and associated structures are maintained and interpreted by a local rail heritage group, allowing public access to the roundhouse and surrounds. The collection of residential buildings within close proximity are of research potential by providing an insight into the variety of residences used to accommodate railway staff; providing a contrast between the simple, utilitarian barracks and the grand Station Master’s residence.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The site is rare as a large scale railway precinct, retaining the majority of its significant features. The Goulburn locomotive depot is rare as an excellent example of a largely intact locomotive depot in NSW, with the roundhouse being one of only seven remaining roundhouse buildings in NSW. The 1869 Gatekeeper's residence is a rare example of its type still in railway ownership and one of the earliest extant examples of its type in NSW. The footbridge is one of only a few surviving old rail truss footbridges, and is a good example of the effects of the economic constraints of the 1890s.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The site has representative significance for its collection of railway structures that collectively demonstrate widespread 19th and early 20th century railway customs, activities and design in NSW, and are representative of similar items that are found in many other railway precincts across the state.


The footbridge was identified as an item of high heritage significance in the 2016 ‘Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy’. The northern Goulburn Station footbridge is one of only a few surviving old rail truss footbridges, and is a good example of the effects of the economic constraints of the 1890s. Even though it is altered, the north station footbridge makes a strong contribution to the heritage values of the overall Goulburn Station precinct.

The c1890 barracks building is a good representative example of late 19th century barracks (rest house) design, displaying full length verandahs on two sides and other features typical of barracks design in the late 19th century.

The 1860s station building is a fine example of the first class station buildings constructed throughout major NSW towns during the 19th Century.

The 1915 station building is a good example of a standard (A8 - A10) early twentieth century station design with fabric, form and details typical of many other island platform buildings of the period.
Integrity/Intactness: The station buildings, roundhouse, barracks building and several other significant buildings at Goulburn remain largely intact.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999SRA291State Rail Authority  No
S170 Register Update Project2009 ARTC/ ORH  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes
Railway Footbridges Heritage Conservation Strategy 2016 NSW Government Architect’s Office Heritage Group  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Writtenb cubed sustainability2006Locomotive roundhouses: heritage conservation strategy
WrittenBerendt, R. & D. Ward/ ARTC2008Goulburn railway barracks statement of heritage impact, February 2008
WrittenCity of Goulburn Railway Centenary Committee1969The first hundred years: Sydney - Goulburn railway 1869-1969
WrittenCottee, J.M.2004Stations on the track: selected New South Wales country railway stations: an historical overview
WrittenForsyth, J.H.1989Stations and tracks: V2: Main Southern Line
WrittenJohn H Forsyth2009NSW Railway Stations - An Alphabetical Arrangement of Railway Station and Place Names
WrittenMcKillop, R2009NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History
WrittenRobert Lee2000Colonial engineer
WrittenWard, D2009Thematic heritage study: railway barracks in country New South Wales

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4806291


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