Carlingford Produce Store | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Carlingford Produce Store

Item details

Name of item: Carlingford Produce Store
Other name/s: Carlingford Produce Cooperative
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Granary/Grain Shed
Primary address: 1 Thallon Street, Carlingford, NSW 2118
Local govt. area: The Hills
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
1 Thallon StreetCarlingfordThe Hills  Primary Address

Statement of significance:

From Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012):
The Carlingford Produce Store is of local significance as an assemblage of vernacular functional buildings comprising the 1927 Feed Mill and incorporating elements from 1902 to the present day. It is representative of vernacular timber and corrugated galvanised iron rural/industrial buildings built in Sydney during the first half of the 20th Century. The building is historically significant as tangible evidence of farming and transport practices in the Carlingford area from the early 20th Century through to the present. It has provided agricultural supplies to the Hills and surrounding districts continuously for 85 years and it also operated as a feed mill for around 60 years. It has social significance for families of past members, customers and staff of the original Producers Cooperative Company and its successors. The store has associations with William Gooden, the Post WWII Chairman and Managing Director responsible for the expansion of the Cooperative - he developed links with the farming and broader communities inlcuding local firms and James Ruse Agricultural High School. The site is a rare surviving example of a purpose built agricultural building in the area, containing operable vintage milling equipment from the first half of the 20th Century. The store has the potential to demonstrate grain handling and feed milling proceses in an authentic context. The surviving equipment, chutes, fittings, timber grain bins, motors, engines and shafts permit a range of interpretive experiences.
Date significance updated: 26 Aug 13
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown
Builder/Maker: Unkowwn
Construction years: 1900-1990
Physical description: From: Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012). Refer to this document for further detailed description of site elements.

PRECINCT ELEMENTS

Railway goods shed (1902)
Milling Hall (1927)
Deliveries/Store (1927)
Store (1927)
Delivery Bay Roof (c1940s)
Covered Area (c1990s)
External grain hoppers (c1960s)
Weighbridge (c1960s)
Weighbridge and rail siding remains (c1902)

CONTEXT
The Carlingford Produce Stores are located diagonally opposite Carlingford raliway station, on the edge of an embankment built up for the railway line. The nearest streets are Thallon and James Streets. To the south of the sheds is a small garden area with disused petrol bowsers and a large gravel area used for car parking. Vehicles access the site via Jenkins Road. The land to the east and north is largely undeveloped. To the west the land slopes down an embankment providing access to the loading docks, hay store and addional parking area, also the main loading area.

BUILT ELEMENTS
The site is a collection of timber and corrugated iron storage sheds containing industrial relics of the process of milling grain. See CMP for building details.

ARCHAEOLOGY
Archaeological potential unknown. There are remnants of the sidings and first weighbridge to the north of the site.

MOVEABLE HERITAGE
Extensive granery equipment and machines - refer to CMP for details.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The buildings are in adequate condition, though frequent minor repairs are required to the roofs, there has been some issues with termites, and some areas of flooring require repair where equipment has been removed.
Date condition updated:27 Aug 13
Modifications and dates: c1900: First weighbridge built
1902: Improvements made to the line including goods siding and large storehouse
1906: Initial buildings contructed
Unknown: Addition of loading platform by railway line
1927: Co-op leased buildings and feed mill built and machinery installed
1950: Gristling plant installed
c1950s: Addition of open shed to east
1952: Office addition built
1959: Railway line to Carlingford electrified
c1960s: Addition of external silos and storage as lean-to
1971: Pelleting machine installed
c1975: Addition of weighbridge
Further information: In 2012 there is an approved proposal to removsome later sheds adjacent to the west side of the store. These buildings are not included within the listing curtilage.
Current use: Produce Store
Former use: Store/Granery/Rail Transport

History

Historical notes: From: Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012):
Carlingford Station was built as part of a private line when the Clyde - Carlingford Railway was proposed as the first stage of a line north to the Dural district, but the line was only contsructed as far as Carlingford. The line was opened in 1896 with the intention of carrying rural produce such as fruit and timber. Carlingford Station became a major transport and trade route for the local agricultural industries.

The line was taken over by the government in 1900. As part of improvements made to the line in 1902, a goods siding was provided and a large storehouse constructed, (possibly part of the Carlingford Produce Store) that opened next to the station to make the area's market gardens and orchards accessible to visitors. The line was electrified to Rosehill in 1936 and then to Carlingford in 1959.

The Carlingford Producers Cooperative Company moved to the site in 1927. Additions to the original building were made at this time including a loading platform by the railway line. The Co-op acted as a community store, with its main produce being mash for poultry. Wheat arrived at the store in its natural form and would be processed into poulty food, and in 1949 equipment was installed for the production of stock feed. Attempts were made to modernise the premises after WWII when mass production was growing.

The building still contains the machinery used to separate, crush, roll and bag the grain that was dropped into a grid on the railway tracks and into a hopper below, as well as other processes for grain handling. All the equipment was hand made from galvanised iron and cedar timber. In later years a weighbridge was installed, replacing a smaller timber weighbridge dating from c1900. Much of the equipment remains in operating order.

An office addition was constructed around 1952 and the external silos were added c1960.

As the area became increasingly surburban and with new legislation limiting production, large scale producers took over the industry and by the late 1970 the Co-op was no longer viable and went into liquidation. A small scale agricultural and garden supplies store remains under the name of Carlingford Produce.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Migration-Activities and processes associated with the resettling of people from one place to another (international, interstate, intrastate) and the impacts of such movements (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Transporting agricultural supplies-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Encouraging commercial development-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Transport of goods-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Carlingford Produce Store is historically significant as a tangible link to farming and transport in the Carlingford area from the early 20th Century through to the present. The store has been occupied and used for the continuous purpose of providing agricultural supplies to the district for over 85 years. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012)
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Carlingford Produce Store has wide and long associations with past staff and customers built over 85 years from members of the original Carlingford Producers Cooperative Company. In particular William Gooden, Chairman and Managing Director was responsible for innovation and expansion of the business and had wide links with farming and broader communities. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Carlingford Produce Store is significant as a collection of vernacular style functional buildins mainly comprising the 1927 Feed Mill and incorporating original elements from 1902. The structures convey a strong sense of the rural origins of the Carlingford area with authentic character. The surviving equipment, chutes, fittings, timber grain bins, motors, engines and shafts permit a wide range of interpretive experiences. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012).
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The Carlingford Produce Store has social significance value to past members, staff and customers. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012).
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Carlingford Produce Store has the potential to demonstrate grain handling and feed milling processing with working examples of medium scale feed milling equipment, capable of functioning and has high research values in this area of technology. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012).
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The site is a rare example of a surviving purpose built agricultural building in the local area, containing rare historic milling equipment from the first half of the 20th Century. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012).
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The site is representative of vernacular timber and corrugated galvanised iron rural/industrial buildings built in Sydney in the first half of the 20th Century. (Carlingford Produce Store CMP (August 2012).
Integrity/Intactness: The site has been added to with buildings and additions over time. The remaining machinery is highly intact.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the ‘Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance’. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the ‘Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair’. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Management PlanColin Israel - Heritage Advice2012Carlingford Produce Store Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: State Government
Database number: 4807643


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