Box Hill House in grounds of McCall gardens | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Box Hill House in grounds of McCall gardens

Item details

Name of item: Box Hill House in grounds of McCall gardens
Other name/s: McCall Garden Colony, McCall Gardens, Box Hill estate
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Pastoralism
Location: Lat: -33.6548835601 Long: 150.8940078230
Primary address: 10 Terry Road, Box Hill, NSW 2153
Parish: Nelson
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: The Hills
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Deerubbin
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP27502
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
10 Terry RoadBox HillThe HillsNelsonCumberlandPrimary Address
10 Terry RoadBaulkham HillsThe Hills  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
McCall Gardens LtdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

Box Hill house and the remains of its former farm estate has historic and social significance as the former country seat of the "Botany Bay Rothschild" Samuel Terry and for its long associations with the farm estates and fluctuating fortunes of the Terry and Rouse families of this district. Despite later modifications the original house dates from the 1820s (Proudfoot, 1987). It has aesthetic significance as a prominent early estate located on a hill top along Windsor Road. (Read, S., draft, 2003).
Date significance updated: 26 Sep 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: Samuel Terry, George Terry
Construction years: 1819-1897
Physical description: A simple brick 1890s farm house with stone-flagged verandahs, now much extended for institutional use. A two story brick building behind the house. Owned by the Sub Normal Children's Assocation (Proudfoot, 1987, 124).

The complex has a wonderful position on top of a sizeable small hill, Box Hill, north-east of Windsor Road, looking across west to the Blue Mountains, and surveying the surrounding district with good views to Rouse Hill house complex to its southeast. .
Date condition updated:18 Aug 03
Modifications and dates: The original weatherboard house was rebuilt and renovated between 1895-7 and replaced by a very gracious brick bungalow which survives (in 1988), together with the Stables and the billiard room which was on top of it. Gerald George Rouse who grew up at Box Hill believed that there had been an even earlier house there before the weatherboard one.

The kitchen buildings were not new in 1897, but neither were they the original ones on site. Of the original buildigns only the stables and the underground tank remained at that time. At this time it was a c.2000 acre estate.

1921 subdivision and sale of the estate via the agent H.F.Halloran, except for the homestead block of 212 acres.

1924 sale of 212 acre homestead block.

Since then it has been much extended for institutional use, obscuring the view of the brick house.
Current use: State run home for mentally deficient boys
Former use: farm estate, hunting grounds

History

Historical notes: Samuel Terry arrived in the colony of New South Wales as a convict in 1801 and amassed a fortune through banking and property interests. At one stage he was the richest man in the colony and a co-founder of the bank of NSW (Niche, 2016, 5).

The 1700 acre Box Hill estate, a property on the north-eastern side of Windsor Road from Rouse Hill, was granted to Robert Fitz in 1816 (Parsons, in ADB vol.1, 1966).

On the nearby Rouse Hill estate, Richard Rouse built Rouse (Hill) House from 1813-20 using convict labour (ibid, 2016, 5).

In 1819 the Box Hill estate was transferred to Samuel Terry (the "Botany Bay Rothschild") after Fitz fell into financial difficulties (ibid, 2016, 5). Terry used Box Hill estate as his country seat. His estate was noted in the General Post Office Directory of 1832 (p.73) as a 'country seat' (Proudfoot, 1987, 124).

At the time of the transfer the estate included an adjoining 530 acre paddock fenced with a five rail fence (Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser, 4/9/1819, 2).

Eleanor Rouse (1813-98) of nearby Rouse Hill estate, married John Terry, son of Samuel Terry in 1831. They made their home at Box Hill and the proximity of the two properties was to lead to further links between the two families. It is thought that Richard Rouse (of Rouse Hill house & farm) built the stables at Box Hill for his daughter Eleanor, although documentary evidence of this appears scarce.

Samuel Terry died in 1838 and the bulk of his property was left to his son, Edward Terry. However John Terry retained control of Box Hill. The estate was considerably enlarged in 1839 with acquisition of a nearby 1000 acre property, Copenhagen, from the family of former Governor, William Bligh (ibid, 2016, 5-6).

John Terry died, aged 31, in a fall from a horse in November 1842 leaving three sons, Samuel Henry, Richard Rouse and Edward. Box Hill was passed on to Samuel Henry Terry. IT was during this period that wheat was grown at Box Hill and Samuel Terry's foreman was Charles Hynds, an English yeoman who lived on the estate for about 50 years and was forbear to the Hynds family in the area (ibid, 2016, 6).

An adjoining property of 150 acres on Windsor Road, Mount Jamison, owned by James Connor, was offered for sale in 1842 (Sydney Free Press, 2/1/1842). The property description gives valuable insight into the spatial organistaion of the homesteads of the area, having a verandah cottage of five rooms with fenced 1/2 acre garden and orchard in front; men's huts and other outbuildings; a two-room slab building for the overseer; large shed for storing grain; and a chain of ponds supplying water (ibid, 2016, 6).

In 1856 Eleanor married Major Wingate and became known (to the Rouses) as "Aunt Wingate" at Rouse Hill, and "Grandma Wingate" at Box Hill. Major Wingate died in 1869 and Grandma Wingate lived on for nearly 30 years at Percy Lodge, Potts Point.

Samuel Henry Terry died in 1887 and the estate was left to his son, George A.Terry (1871-1957). In late 1888 the district experienced severe drought, with the small water supply at Box Hill failing and much of the area depending on the supply at Rouse Hill. Much of Box Hill estate was burnt by bushfire (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers' Advocate, 1/12/1888,2). By 1889 it was noted that both Box Hill and Rouse Hill were 'surrounded by open grass paddocks, which at one time were in high cultivation for cereals, but which have latterly been devoted to grazing purposes' (Australian Town and Country Journal, 26/1/1889, 21: in ibid, 2016).

George A. Terry married Nina Rouse (1875-1968) in 1895 but did not move into Box Hill House immediately. They lived at Rouse Hill House for over a year while Box Hill House was being rebuilt and renovated for them, together with the Stable and the billiard room which was on top of it (early 1897 it was ready). The main part of the house, which is believed to have been of weatherboard, was demolished and replaced by a very gracious brick bungalow which survives (1988). (Their son) Gerald George Rouse, who grew up at Box Hill, believed that there had been an even earlier house there before the weatherboard one.

Initial plans for a grand residence had to be down-scaled, but at least 30,000 bricks were used and four rooms of the original house were retained (Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 18/7/1896, 4: in ibid, 2016).

George Terry was an avid hunter and horseman and in 1891 the Box Hill Race Club held a New YEar's Day meet on the estate (WIndsor and Richmond Gazette, 3/1/1891, 4). In 1894 the Box Hill Picnic Races were held, where guests were served lunch under the old trees at the homestead (Sydney Morning Herald, 30/7/1894, 3: in ibid, 2016). In July 1895 the Sydney Hunt Club met for a 'run' over the Box Hill country, as 'Vandorian' put it in a long report called "A Day with the Hounds" (Evening News, 27 July 1895). A photograph of the occasion still hangs at Rouse Hill House. Later the Club's hunting hound kennels were kept at Box Hill. He was master of the Sydney Hunt Club by 1907 and figured in an article by 'First Check' published in "The Lone Hand" (article titled "Hunting in NSW", 2/9/1907).

Hunts were held on Box Hill and neighbouring properties and descriptions of hunts at Box Hill refer to numerous paddocks with high fences used for steeplechasing. There was also a designated racecourse on a flat paddock lying between Windsor & Terry Roads (ibid, 2016).

George and Nina moved into Box Hill house in early 1897. The kitchen buildings were not new, but neither were they the original ones on site. Of the original buildings only the stables and the underground tank remained essentially as they were. The complex had (and has) a commanding position on top of a sizeable small hill, looking across west to the Blue Mountains, and surveying the surrounding district.

George and Nina had five sons, the first having being born at Rouse Hill before they moved into Box Hill.

George Terry ran sheep, having as many as 4000 head and 100 bales of wool in the shed. Terry Road was a private driveway, with a white gate near Windsor Road, terminating at the homestead (ibid, 2016).

In 1899 two Chinese gardeners established a market garden on a portion of the estate (Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 3/9/1899, 3: in ibid, 2016).

In 1906 there was an armed confrontation between George Terry and two employees, and a group of thieves trying to steal pigs from the piggery (Evening News, 11/7/1906, 6: in ibid, 2016).

George borrowed some 6000 pounds to do the homestead rebuilding, and this large sum, coupled with his rather extravagant lifestyle and spending, proved troublesome for the family, given that the pasture on the c.2000 acre estate was not the best and careful farming would not have yielded high income. Lacking any training, his troubles with borrowing money led to his mortaging all his properties, Box Hill's subdivision and sale and George's eventual bankruptcy.

Financial difficulties led to Box Hill estate's subdivision into 170 farm allotments and sale via the agent Henry F.Halloran in 1919 (Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 30/5/1919, 2). The immediate homestead property of 212 acres was preserved. As part of the subdivision, Terry ROad was extended through to Old Pitt Town Road. Three of the new allotments contained existing buildings: two were on Nelson Road (Blocks 154 and 155) and one on Hynds Road (Block 82)(ibid, 2016).

The family continued to live at Box Hill for a time, but in great stringency. The homestead block of 212 acres was transferred to Nina, who had to borrow money to buy it. At times the Terry's had no food to eat, and George's cousin Jack Terry came to the rescue more than once. The five sons however were unprepared and lacked financial backing for their education and future prospects. Nina herself was declared bankrupt in 1928 (NSW Government Gazette, 28/9/1928: in ibid, 2016).

After Bessie Rouse died in 1924 Box Hill House and its 212 acres were sold to Mr Neville and George and Nina Terry moved to Rouse Hill House. George was employed on the property as a labourer, Nina as a cook.

In 1941 there was an important auction sale of dairy cattle, farming and dairy plant on the estate, indicating the days of Box Hill being a viable, working estate were over (Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 25/7/1941, 4: in ibid, 2016).

The southern and eastern portions of the remaining property were later subdivided. In 1956 the then owner of Box Hill, William McCall, donated the house with a curtilage of 40 acres to the Subnormal Children's Welfare Association to established the McCall Garden Community to care for boys with disabilities (ibid, 2016).

George Terry died on 24th July 1957 aged 85.

During the 1970s the care facility was greatly expanded, initially with the purchase of old trams, and later by construction of kitchen and accommodation blocks (www.mccallgardens.org.au/history, in ibid, 2016).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Convict labour-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places: How are significant places marked in the landscape of Parramatta by, or for, different groups?-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Creating environments evocative of the 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of passive recreation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of food production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use pastoral homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Chinese market gardens-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Suburban Centres-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Fencing boundaries - wooden post and rail-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A quiet Rural District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administering a public health system-
7. Governing-Governing Welfare-Activities and process associated with the provision of social services by the state or philanthropic organisations Children in need-
7. Governing-Governing Welfare-Activities and process associated with the provision of social services by the state or philanthropic organisations Hospital/nursing home phase-
7. Governing-Governing Welfare-Activities and process associated with the provision of social services by the state or philanthropic organisations Providing care for mentally disabled youth-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Horse racing-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Horse jumping-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going hunting and shooting-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Horse riding-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the racetrack-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing exclusive clubs-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Samuel Terry, wealthy emancipist merchant-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Terry, grazier and hunting enthusiast-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Eleanor Terry, later Wingate, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with George Terry, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Nina Rouse, later Terry, grazier-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates, garden walls and pruning and tree surgery but not including extensive lopping.
(3) The alteration of any part of the interiorof the buildings, the stable block being excluded from this exemption.
(4) Maintenance and repairs to the existing access road and drainage.
(5) Maintenance and minor extensions to existing buildings which were erected after 1922.
(6) Maintenance and installation of services.
(7) Change of use
(8) Subdivision.
May 23 1986
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions See File For Schedule


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any item on the site meaning the continuous protective care of existing materials;
(2) Alterations to the existing buildings other than the buildings known as Box Hill House and Nelson House (the stables), provided that these do not add to the external bulk of the building nor adversely affect the heritage significance of the former Box Hill House and stable block.
Mar 23 1989
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP review for endorsement Jan 19 2017
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP - Box Hill House Review for endorsement Jun 26 2017
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP - Box Hill House - Final for Endorsement Mar 19 2018

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0061302 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0061323 May 86 85 
Regional Environmental PlanSydney REP No. 19 - Rouse Hill Dev't Area 01 Sep 89   
Local Environmental PlanThe Hills LEP 2012 Schedule 5 Part 1I3918 Aug 12   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenHession1977A History of Rouse Hill, Box Hill and Nelson
WrittenMcClymont2003Baulkham Hills Shire
WrittenNiche Environment & Heritage2016Box Hill House preliminary Archaeological Assessment
WrittenProudfoot, Helen1987Exploring Sydney's West
WrittenRouse Thornton, Caroline1988Rouse Hill House & the Rouses

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5001111
File number: S90/03566/1


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