Dredges Cottage | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Dredges Cottage

Item details

Name of item: Dredges Cottage
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Cottage
Location: Lat: -34.0700828860 Long: 150.8109211430
Primary address: 303 Queen Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560
Parish: St Peter
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT111 DP705804
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
303 Queen StreetCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Campbelltown City CouncilLocal Government25 Mar 99

Description

Designer/Maker: Fowler's Cottage
Construction years: 1875-1875
Physical description: Garden:
(The Site is) physical evidence of the rural character of Campbelltown's main street surviving well into the mid-Victorian period. It is the last remaining cottage on Queen Street and is a reminder of a form that was once the dominant type (LEP, 2016). This includes its open space and garden character (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 21/1/19).

There are grassed lawn areas to the east (street side) and south of the cottage.

A lone pine (Pinus halapensis, Aleppo pine) was planted in the garden (7/8/2015, now some 2m tall) by Vice-Consul Cafe Asik for the Turkish Government, and Federal MP for Macarthur, Russell Matheson, commemorating 100 years since the Battle of Lone Pine (Kahn Surt), 6-10/8/1915 (Stuart Read, visit, 2018).

Cottage:
Fowler's Cottage is of historical significance as physical evidence of the rural character of Campbelltown's main street surviving well into the mid-Victorian period. It is the last remaining cottage on Queen Street and is a reminder of a form that was once the dominant type. The building is associated with important early business figures in Campbelltown including Daniel Fowler and the Bursill family. Fowler's Cottage is of aesthetic significance and contributes to the setting of the significant Queen Street group, an exceptional grouping of Georgian buildings that may be unique in NSW (LEP, 2016).

Fowler's Cottage is a symmetrical vernacular single storey cottage with four rooms opening off a central corridor. The building has a hipped metal roof with two chimneys. Windows are two pane double hung, and the front door is a recent panelled door with glazed upper panels. There are larger openings to both sides at the rear with French doors protected by full height timber shutters. The building has a cyma-reversa verandah to the street face and the sides with cast iron brackets and small Scamozzi column heads. The external walls are rendered, lined and painted but there is no decoration, not even an external sill (LEP, 2016).

A brief internal inspection revealed no Georgian features. All internal doors are four panelled Victorian era doors and architraves. The French doors have a high mid rail consistent with a Mid-Victorian date. Ceilings are plain and walls are plastered (ibid, 2016).

There is a simple detached timber gabled kitchen annex at the rear with a small wash house addition contemporary with the cottage. The slab hut shown in 1980s photos has not survived and a metal clad structure now occupies its footprint. The building's context was completely altered when the Campbelltown Mall car park was built around the building (ibid, 2016).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The building appears well kept and in use.
The sub-floor of the cottage may contain archaeological deposits from the Victorian period (18/8/2009: CCC).
Date condition updated:21 Jan 19
Modifications and dates: 1840:Building and outbuildings on site shown in Bradbury Park Estate plan of 1844
c1875:Current building most likely replaces original structure, verandah is thus original
c1905:Exterior rendered and lined, windows and sills altered, chimneys altered
1983:Slab hut demolished, Mall car park constructed
Further information: Further investigation of the fabric is warranted.
Current use: Office (Veterans' Recreation Centre)
Former use: Cottage residence

History

Historical notes: The original inhabitants of the Campbelltown area were mostly people of the Dharawal (sometimes referred to as Tharawal) language group, who ranged from the coast to the east, the Georges River in the west, north to Botany Bay and south to Nowra. However, Campbelltown was a meeting point with the Dharug language group (whose area extended across the Blue Mountains), and early history of the area includes references to both peoples. (Liston, Carol: Campbelltown: The Bicentennial History, 1988; www.abc.net.au/indigenous). Mount Annan, to the south-west of the Campbelltown City Centre, was known as Yandel'ora to its original owners, the Dharawal people and was an important meeting place for Aboriginal people from as far away as northern Queensland and southern Victoria. (http://www.daff.gov.au/natural-resources/landcare/publications/making_a_difference_a_celebration_ of_landcare/section_6_-_indigenous_landcare)(LEP, 2016).

With the establishment of the convict colony in Sydney Harbour in 1788, the displacement of Aboriginal people began. A smallpox epidemic decimated many of the coastal clans, but was less destructive amongst the inland peoples (ibid, 2016).

Escaped cattle from the settlement moved south and bred in the Campbelltown/Camden area and after their discovery in 1795, the area became known as The Cow Pastures (or Cowpasture). In 1805, John Macarthur obtained a grant of 5,000 acres (later expanded to 10,000 acres) in the area, some of the best grazing land then known in the colony (ibid, 2016).

By 1809, 34 settlers had received grants in the newly named Minto district (named after Lord Minto, the Governor-General of India) in the northern portion of Campbelltown. Many of these early settlers were Irish, including surveyor James Meehan, who allocated himself a generous portion (now Macquarie Fields). Prominent settlers included surgeon Charles Throsby, who was allocated 600 acres (now Glenfield), Dr William Redfern (Campbellfield), Dr Robert Townson (Varroville) and Richard Brooks (Denham Court)(ibid, 2016).

Though peaceful, the Dharawal people bore the brunt of a punitive expedition led by Captain James Wallis in 1816. At least 14 Dharawal people were massacred at Appin, to the distress of sympathetic settlers such as Charles Throsby of Glenfield. The Appin massacre of 1816 was a devastating and tragic event for the Dharawal people and other local clans, and was a difficult period in terms of the relationship between Indigenous people and European settlers. Corroborees and other ceremonies continued under the protection of the Macarthurs of Camden, though numbers steadily declined, with diseases introduced by the Europeans also having a devastating effect on the Dharawal population (ibid, 2016).

As the district became more closely settled, a town was needed further south than Liverpool. Campbelltown was formally established in 1820 and named 'Campbelltown', in honour of Mrs Elizabeth Macquarie's maiden name of Campbell. In 1826, the town plan was formalised (ibid, 2016).

Between 1835 and 1845, the number of Aboriginal people in the Campbelltown Police District had decreased from twenty to none. However, limited tribal life continued and corroborees were still held at Camden Park and Denham Court until at least the 1850s. During 1858, approximately 200 Aboriginal people attended the celebrations at Campbelltown that were held to mark the opening of the railway line (ibid, 2016).

The Cottage has previously been assumed to date from circa 1890, however there is good reason to assign an earlier date to the building, most likely closer to the 1870s.The cottage is a rural type cottage in a vernacular style very similar to an early Georgian cottage type. By 1890 Queen St was clearly a commercial street and it is to be expected that the typology built at that time would have been more like the two storey 1890s town house that once occupied the neighbouring site at 309 Queen St (demolished 1984). The building has the traditional Georgian/mid Victorian four room configuration, and most importantly, a separate weatherboard kitchen wing at the rear, which should place it earlier in the 19th century. The cyma-reversa verandah detail is inspired by the Gothic period, which was in vogue for residences during the 1870s. A similar one was introduced to McGuanne House in the 1870s (ibid, 2016).

It should be noted that the Bradbury Park Estate plan dated 1844 has a building shown on the site of the present Cottage, and also appears to have outbuildings similar to those at the rear of Cottage. However the fabric evidence makes it unlikely that this is the same structure. The existing finishes are mid to late Victorian throughout. Why a four room Georgian cottage would have been replaced with another so early is unknown, but perhaps the one shown in the 1844 plan was a weatherboard building. It is also possible that the earlier building was extensively refurbished and refitted over the basic structure. Confirmation would require detailed fabric analysis of roof spaces etc (ibid, 2016).

The land title search stretches back to Ann Fowler (nee Booth), who sold the building in 1901. Ann Fowler was the second wife of Daniel Fowler. They were married in Campbelltown in 1866 and lived in the cottage (in recent years called "Dredge's Cottage" ) (supporting the earlier construction date). Colonial-born Daniel Fowler (b. 1822) arrived in Campbelltown in 1840, aged 18yrs. He had trained as a cooper. His first marriage was to Mary Bursill (b. 1833) in 1850 when she was 17 yrs old. Mary was the second child of the significant local storekeeper, William Bursill. Perhaps due to the Bursill family, Daniel became a butcher and storekeeper. Mary died very young, in 1859, aged 26 years. Daniel remarried to Ann Booth in 1866. Daniel Fowler is registered as a butcher in "Main Street" (Queen Street) in the 1872 Grevilles Official Post Office Directory of New South Wales. Daniel retired in the early 1870s, selling his business to his partner James Wilson, but his sons continued to run businesses in Campbelltown. It may be that Daniel Cooper used the proceeds of his business sale to build the present cottage for his retirement. This is the date the fabric would most favour (ibid, 2016).

Daniel died in 1900 (aged 78 years). Ann Fowler sold the Cottage to Emma Fahey in 1901. Emma Fahey willed it to her two sons, James & Stephen, in 1937. Stephen Fahey sold to John Dredge in 1953. John Dredge willed it to his children Garnet, Douglas and Zilla in 1973. They then sold it to GJ Coles in 1981, and the Campbelltown Mall became a reality in 1984 (ibid, 2016).

The most likely date for the Cottage to have been altered externally is in the early 1900s, when it changed ownership. This accords well with the character of the changes. The walls were rendered and lined, and projecting sills cut off. The windows were changed to two pane double hung. It appears as though the French doors were retained with their external shutters, as these are mid-Victorian. The chimneys may have been extended with Regency style cappings (ibid, 2016).

The cottage's context has changed dramatically as a result of it being surrounded by the Campbelltown Mall car park, although it still plays an important part in the streetscape of Queen Street (ibid, 2016).

Airds
This early name used to describe the entire Campbelltown area. Governor Macquarie, on his first visit in 1810, wrote: 'I intend forming this tract of country into a new and separate district for the accommodation of small settlers, and to name it Airds in honour of my dear good Elizabeth's family estate (in Scotland)'. Airds was widely used at first but as individual local villages came into being, the broad name fell out of use and it wasn't reborn until 1975 when the NSW Housing Commission converted bush farms at 'South Kentlyn' into a new housing estate - Airds (Macarthur Advertiser).

Permanent European settlement in the Campbelltown area had begun in 1809 as an alternative to the flood-prone Hawkesbury district. Work on a road from Sydney to Liverpool was started in 1811. It was opened in August 1814 and was soon extended further south to Appin. This road, variously known as Campbelltown Road, Appin Road or the Sydney Road, passed through Campbelltown. The section through the town was called the High Street until the last decade of the 19th century when it was renamed Queen Street (Orwell & Peter Phillips, 1995, vol.2, 1-2).

The land on which the Queen Street cottages stand was part of a grant of 140 acres to Joseph Phelps in 1816. He had been working the land for some years before receiving formal title to it. Phelps was one of the farmers of Airds and Appin who subscribed funds for a Sydney courthouse in July 1813. His grant was seized, possibly as soon as it was formally issued, by the Provost Marshal, William Gore in lieu of payment by Phelps of debts totalling 170 pounds. THe land was auctioned in January 1817 to William Bradbury for 100 pounds plus twelve cattle and the grain produced from the crop growing on the land (ibid, 1995).


Immediately north of Phelps' grant, Assistant Surveyor James Meehan had informally reserved 175 acres for a village (AMCG, 1994 say 'in 1815'.) In 1816 most of the land in the area was granted, leaving a portion of 175 acres unalienated, and surrounded by several grants (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The reserved land was formally declared a town by Governor Macquarie in December 1820 and named Campbelltown in honour of his wife (Elizabeth)'s family (ibid, 1995).

William Bradbury (1774-1836) a native of Birmingham, was transported to NSW aboard the 'Guildford' in 1812. His wife Elizabeth remained in England but his daughter, Mary (1797-1852) followed her father to Australia in 1815. Bradbury had no other children in NSW, though he established a relationship with a woman named Alice and in April 1836 married a Campbelltown widow, Catherine Patrick, nee Acres (c.1801-1883). Bradbury died two months later (ibid, 1995, 2).

Governor Macquarie visited Campbelltown in January 1822. He and his party ate a 'hearty' breakfast at 'Bradbury's', indicating that Bradbury had built an inn. This was probably the inn later known as the Royal Oak, on the western side of the High Street. Macquarie noted in his journal that 'Bradbury is building a very good two storey brick house on his own farm and on a very pretty eminence immediately adjoining Campbell-Town as an inn for the accommodation fo the public, and having asked me to give his farm a name, I have called it Bradbury Park. In 1826 Bradbury Park House was considered by William Dumaresq, inspector of roads and bridges, as the best building in Campbelltown when he reported on buildings suitable for military use (ibid, 1995, 2).

As the main street of Campbelltown, High Street or Sydney Road and later Queen Street, was at the edge of town, one side of the street was not within the town boundary while the other was. Canny traders soon realised that either side of the main road was as good as the other and leased or bought land from the grantees bordering the town proper. By the 1840s more than a few shops and hotels occupied the western side of the High Street. The coming of the railway in 1858 also aided in securing the commercial focus of the town on Queen Street (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The Queen Street terraces were identified by Helen Baker (Proudfoot) in the early 1960s as a unique group of two-storey late Georgian vernacular buildings which were considered to form the only surviving late-1840s streetscape within the County of Cumberland. The buildings were acquired by the Cumberland County Council and its successors, the State Planning Authority and Department of Planning, to ensure their preservation (ibid, 1995, 1).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Dharawal Nation - contact sites-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Suburban Centres-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Surveying by James Meehan-Aboriginal and European; may include sub-divisions, fences, Survey marks etc.
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 18th century town and settlement developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the suburbs-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Garden-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impact of railways on suburban development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Roadside Villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Involvement with the First (Great) World War-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Repatriating returned service personnel-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Building Peace time healing and understanding between cultures-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Memorialising those who served in war-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Memorialising those who served in war-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation War Memorial Lone Pine planting for Gallipoli campaign-
7. Governing-Governing Welfare-Activities and process associated with the provision of social services by the state or philanthropic organisations Providing services for ex-servicemen-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Commemorative tree planting to war dead-

Recommended management:

This item is listed on the State Heritage Register. Any new works should be sensitive to heritage fabric and should be accompanied by a Statement of Heritage Impact or Conservation Management Plan. Works will require a Section 60 application under the NSW Heritage Act, unless exemptions for minor works have been sought from the NSW Heritage Council and granted under Section 57 of the Act. A development application to Council will also be required in accordance with the heritage provisions of the relevant Local Environmental Plan: in general, development consent is required for any external works other than maintenance of existing fabric on a like for like basis, and for structural works to the interior (for example removal of a structural wall). Development applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with both Council planning staff and the NSW Heritage Branch prior to planning extensions or alterations. Note: This item has been recommended for removal from the State Heritage Register.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementPrepare or include in a Development Control Plan (DCP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act general building & garden maintenance


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(i) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
Feb 26 1988
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act See File For Schedule


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
Jan 27 1989
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0064002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0064027 Jan 89 10 
Local Environmental PlanCampbelltown LEP 2016I0064011 Mar 16   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Campbelltown Heritage Study Review2009 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Tourism 2007Campbelltown Heritage Walk View detail
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Campbelltown Heritage Walk View detail
WrittenCampbelltown City Council2007Campbelltown Heritage Walk
WrittenMacarthur Advertiser Our Heritage - exploring the history behind Macarthur's suburb names View detail
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips Architects1995Conservation Management Plan - 288-294 Queen Street, Campbelltown

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5001113
File number: EF10/20024; S90/5449;HC32769


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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