Bomaderry Railway Station and yard group | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Bomaderry Railway Station and yard group

Item details

Name of item: Bomaderry Railway Station and yard group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.8544622942 Long: 150.6093358580
Primary address: Illawarra railway, Bomaderry, NSW 2541
Local govt. area: Shoalhaven
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Nowra

Boundary:

North: rear property boundary of Station Master's residence; East: property boundary adjacent to railway lines to the north, then the boundary of RailCorp property partly fronting Railway Street; South: the boundary of RailCorp property fronting Bolong Road; West: boundary of RailCorp property fronting Meroo Street. Note: this curtilage includes the platform building, platform, weighbridge, goods office, railway tracks and turntable. The curtilage excludes the Bomaderry timber trestle bridge, which is the subject of a separate heritage inventory forms.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Illawarra railwayBomaderryShoalhaven  Primary Address
Railway StreetBomaderryShoalhaven  Alternate Address
Meroo StreetBomaderryShoalhaven  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government21 Oct 98

Statement of significance:

The Bomaderry Railway Station and Yard group is of State historical significance as a significant collection of railway structures and machinery dating from 1893 to 1946 at an important terminus location with a significant history as a goods yard, and for its relationship with the development of Bomaderry and Nowra since 1893, including its role in the development of local industry.

The Bomaderry Railway Station 1946 platform building is of State aesthetic significance as one of the finest representative examples of an Inter-War Functionalist style Railway building in the state. It is particularly noteworthy for its use of curved elements, such as the projecting bay and awning. The Bomaderry turntable is rare (one of 3 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Waterfall and Kiama).

The Bomaderry Station Master's residence (1893) is of State historical significance as evidence of late 19th century railway operational requirements to accommodate railway staff on site at railway stations, as one of the few remaining structures at the Bomaderry railway terminus dating from 1893, and as a now rare design of station master's residence, the design of which has historical association with the office of Henry Deane, Engineer-in-Chief of Railways Construction 1891-1901. Bomaderry station master's residence is of aesthetic significance as a simple vernacular weatherboard Victorian Georgian style house, purpose-built for the accommodation of railway staff.
Date significance updated: 22 Feb 11
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways to 1932 and N.S.W Dept of Railways
Builder/Maker: 1893 Buildings-J.J. Featherstone & T. E. Barbal, N.S.W Dept of Railways, W. Monie & J. Angus (line)
Construction years: 1893-1945
Physical description: PRECINCT ELEMENTS
Context / Landscape

Structures:
Jib Crane (1934)
Turntable (1914)
Platform (1934, 1946)
Signals
Other Structures (privately owned).

Buildings:
Platform building (1946)
Goods shed (1893, 1944)
Station Master's Residence (1893)

CONTEXT / Landscape
Bomaderry Station is entered from the west via the central projecting semi-circular lobby of the 1946 platform building. There is a car park (accessed from Meroo Street) immediately to the west of the platform building. There is a single perimeter platform on the eastern side of the 1946 platform building, and at the southern end of the platform is the horse dock and signals.

The station perimeter is defined by white powder coated aluminium fencing.

There are a set of points on the platform in an aluminium fenced enclosure at the southern end of the platform beneath a flat corrugated steel roofed shelter carried on 4 steel posts.

The yard stretches to the north, south and east of the platform building and platform. The goods shed, with jib crane at its northern end, is located to the southeast of the platform and visible from it. The weighbridge (no longer in RailCorp ownership) is on the eastern side of the railway lines. The turntable is at the far southern end of the railway yard and not visible from the platform.

The Station Master's residence is on the west side of the railway lines, north of the Bomaderry station car park. The residence faces the Railway Station car park to the south of the property, not Meroo Street, which is to the west boundary of the property. The site is fenced with cyclone wire fencing.

Tree plantings south of the station car park, north of the platform building and in the residence garden.

A planting bed with the name of hte station 'Bomaderry' spelt out in closely planted and tightly clipped bedding plants is in the corridor opposite the platform, The garden bed is edged with railway sleepers laid flat reinforced by a length of old rail to act as a vehicle wheel bumper (Longworth, 2012, 6).

STRUCTURES:
JIB CRANE (1934)
The jib crane is located just north of and adjacent to the good shed deck/platform, and is mounted on a round concrete base almost level with the height of the platform. The crane is pinned in to prevent movement. The crane is marked "T133" and "Safe Load 8 tons Class 1".

TURNTABLE (1914)
The turntable is located at the far southern end of the Bomaderry Railway Station yard complex. It is a sunken circular brick edged structure with a single rail on timber sleepers running around the inside, and a cast iron turntable machine in the centre marked "William Sellers & Co. Philadelphia No. 1327". The brick edging of the turntable has a soldier course capping, but is otherwise in stretcher bond. There is also an old hold-down point not far to the north of the turntable structure.

PLATFORM (1934, 1946)
A long perimeter platform extending north-south on the eastern side of the Platform building. The Bomaderry Platform base is brick with a concrete base, with an asphalt surface. At the south-western end there is a loading dock and access built in 1934 for British Australian Milk Pty Ltd. A set of points is located nearby.

STATION MASTER'S RESIDENCE SITE:
Station Master's residence (1893) (type 6)
Fibro garage (c. 1940s)
Cyclone wire fencing (c. 1970s)

OTHER STRUCTURES (PRIVATELY OWNED):
Weighbridge (1921)
Former Nowra Dairy Co-op Building (1938)

MOVEABLE ITEMS: SIGNALS (1946)
There are a set of signal points on the platform in a aluminium fenced enclosure at the southern end of the platform beneath a flat corrugated steel roofed shelter carried on 4 steel posts.

OTHER NEARBY STRUCTURES (PRIVATELY OWNED):
WEIGHBRIDGE( 1921)
Located on the eastern side of the railway tracks, opposite the southern end of the platform, within a cyclone wire fenced enclosure, the weighbridge is a small single storey weatherboard building with a gabled corrugated steel roof. The building has timber double hung windows, and a timber tongue & grooved door on its southern side. The building has plain timber bargeboards to the north and south gable ends. Although the building is privately owned and outside the curtilage, its proximity to and relationship with Bomaderry Station makes it necessary to consider it an important part of the site's history.

FORMER NOWRA DAIRY CO-OP BUILDING (1938)
Located a short distance from the station (at the northern end of the platform) is a building associated with the former Nowra Dairy Co-Op siding. This building is also an excellent example of Inter-War period architecture and is particularly noteworthy for its bowed steel roof. Although the building is privately owned and outside the curtilage, its proximity to and relationship with Bomaderry Station makes it necessary to consider it an important part of the site's history.

BUILDINGS:
STATION MASTERS RESIDENCE (1893)
Exterior: The Station Master's residence is a freestanding weatherboard single storey house with a gabled corrugated steel roof, skillion roofed rear sections, and a hipped corrugated steel roofed front veranda. East and west gable ends feature timber barge boards and timber louvred vents. Windows are timber framed double hung, and the front windows (facing into the enclosed front veranda) have vertical glazing bars to sashes. Some windows have timber fretwork window hoods. The house is supported on brick piers. There is a later rear skillion roofed laundry addition at the north-western corner of the residence. The front veranda has been enclosed with horizontal weatherboards and fixed and louvred timber framed windows, with a door at the western end. There is a section of brickwork towards the rear on the western elevation which is the base of a former kitchen chimney.

Interior: The interior of the residence appeared relatively intact, with timber wall linings and timber ceilings to main rooms accessed (bedrooms not accessed). Vinyl and carpet floor coverings.

FIBRO GARAGE (c. 1940s)
A freestanding single storey fibro asbestos garage at the rear, to the northeast of the residence, which has a corrugated steel gabled roof.

PLATFORM BUILDING (1946)
Exterior: A single storey brick Inter war Functionalist style building, with 2 slightly projecting decorative soldier courses (above and below window height) and a complex glazed hipped terra cotta tiled roof form. The building is divided into three bays, each recessed behind the other to create a "stepped" effect. There are two semi-circular ended lobbies flanking the projecting parcels office on the west elevation. The circular lobby has been achieved by the use of projecting square masonry ribs (rather than callow bricks) to support a flat, concrete slab roof over the lobbies.

Most windows are original steel framed awning windows, generally placed in groups of 3 or 4 vertically. There are some timber double doors and some timber flush doors with sidelights. Fenestration is symmetrical. The walls feature brick vents. There are curved brick edges to doorways.

The waiting room exit features a pair of curved brick pilasters supporting a curved cement rendered hood. Toilets at the northern end of the platform building have an additional solider course of brickwork beneath the windows, steel framed awning windows in groups of 3, and some steel framed window openings each with 3 large frosted glass louvres. The building has wide fibro clad eaves.

An external curved corned awning carried on round painted steel posts faces the car park. The car park (west) elevation of the main platform building has projecting solider courses in places.

Interior: Most of the original interior fitout has been removed although some original elements remain, particularly in the lobby and parcels office foyer. The interior consists of a series of discrete spaces arranged on a linear pattern with direct access from the platform. From east to west these spaces comprise: men's toilet, ladies toilet, ladies waiting room, general waiting room, booking office, Station Master's room, parcels office, store, staff room and out-of-room. The projecting semi-circular bay contains a public lobby and is the main entrance to the station and platform.

The waiting room interior has modern floor tiles, a colourful modern mural to 3 walls, and a modern fibre-cement ceiling. The entry area to the station from the car park has modern tiling, modern mosaic decoration, and fixed steel framed windows in groups of 4 (vertically), and also the interior wall facing west has been decorated with hand painted tiles above doorway level. The hand painted tiles to the entry lobby and the mural to the waiting room appear to have been part of a recent community art project.

GOODS SHED (1893, 1944)
Exterior: This is a single storey rectangular corrugated steel shed (walls and roof) with a gabled roof, elevated on a timber platform. The goods shed and crane are isolated between railway lines to the southeast of the station platform. The goods shed has brick piers and a timber floor which extends out to the west beyond the building. To the north of the building is a concrete deck on a steel framed base level with the floor of the goods shed. To the north of the goods shed, over the southern end of the concrete deck, is a gable roofed shelter carried on 4 timber posts, the gable roof being an extension of the corrugated steel gabled roof of the goods shed. The north end of the deck platform has a flat corrugated steel roofed shelter carried on 4 steel posts. There are concrete steps with a pipe railing at the north-western end of the concrete deck/platform. The goods shed features two pairs of timber tongue and grooved double doors with diagonal boarding, which face west.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Platform building (1946): good
Goods shed (1893, 1944): poor. The timber floor is extensively deteriorated.
Jib Crane (1934): moderate. The crane is rusting and rain water is pooling beneath the crane.
Turntable (1914): moderate
Platform (1946); good
Horse dock and points (1946): good
Moveable items: Signals: good
Former Station Masters Residence (1893): moderate condition.
Fibro garage (c. 1940s): moderate condition.
Cyclone wire fencing (modern): good condition.
Date condition updated:22 Feb 11
Modifications and dates: 1934: timber stage and access erected at south end of platform for British Australian Milk Pty Ltd
1936: Coal stage removed
1938: Trucking yards removed, and the land sold to the Nowra Dairy Cooperative. Platform extended south.
c. 1940s: addition of fibro asbestos garage behind the residence.
1944: 1893 Goods shed extended.
1946: The current platform and platform building replaced the 1893 platform and platform building destroyed by fire in 1945.
1994: Internal refurbishment of Platform building, new roof tiling to match existing, and new roof membranes to flat roofed sections of platform building.
N.d: engine shed and carriage shed shown on 1928 plans removed.
N.d: Alterations to the Station Master's residence- front veranda enclosed with weatherboards and timber framed fixed and louvred windows; rear skillion roofed laundry addition in hardiplank at the north-western corner of the residence, with aluminium framed windows; demolition of chimneys (there were originally 2 chimneys to the ridge of the gabled roof and a kitchen chimney at the rear - the brick base of the kitchen chimney remains). The original typical design for this type of Station Master's residence would also have included a timber picket front fence and a timber valence to the front veranda, neither now extant. 1928 plans for the station precinct show garden areas to the south of the residence, within what is now the station car park, and these are no longer extant.
Current use: railway station & yard, light industrial uses
Former use: Aboriginal land, railway station & yard, goods handling

History

Historical notes: In 1852 the Nowra township site was gazetted , and the first town blocks at Nowra were offered for sale in 1857, however development of the town was slow. By 1860 Nowra had a population of 40. In 1861 a post office was established at Nowra. By 1870 the town of Nowra had nine hotels, a town hall, and numerous other businesses. In 1885 Nowra was proclaimed a town.

The single line railway built from Bombo (North Kiama) to Bomaderry was designed as the ‘Kiama to Jervis Bay Railway’ and terminated at Bomaderry in 1893 with the intention to continue over the proposed railway bridge, but this never eventuated and the bridge over the Shoalhaven River originally built for the railway is still used as a road bridge. Bomaderry Railway Station opened on 2nd June 1893.

The former Station Master's residence, along with the goods shed, timber trestle bridge over Shoalhaven Creek, and the Edwards Avenue Bomaderry timber overbridge, are among the few remaining structures from the 1893 construction period of the extension of the Illawarra Railway Line from Bombo.

"By 1888, with a change in railway administration, standard and economic building designs were being introduced for all types of railway buildings including residences. These standard designs were used at various locations throughout NSW and were altered slightly depending on site specific conditions. The simple designs for Station Master's and Gatekeeper's residences were efficiently planned and employed economical materials such as timber and galvanised iron. A set of standard design drawings for "Station Officer's Houses" were approved by the Chief Commissioner, Charles Oliver, in 1899. These designs [prepared by Henry Deane] were known as the J1, J2, J3 and J4, and one for a 'Gate Keeper's Cottage' K1. The designs were based on standard designs that were used throughout the network during the early 1890s. The ‘J2’ design (Type 6) is a standard type residence dating from 1885-1920, usually of timber or brick with a high gabled roof with rafters extending to form a veranda across the front of the building, and two chimneys. The buildings featured a simple symmetrical façade with central four-panel front door, front room windows to either side and a rear skillion service wing. While the overall form remained similar to J1 it was 4ft wider, and provided larger rooms.

The 1893 Bomaderry Station Master's residence is a relatively early example of the type, having been constructed prior to the issue of the series of standard plans for these buildings in 1899.

Serving as a terminus station, Bomaderry gained a large goods yard that was extended in 1944 as a wartime measure but in recent years part of this has been sold, including the 1921 weighbridge and office. Initially the station yard included an 1893 platform, platform building and goods shed, as well as coal and watering facilities and a 50’-0" turntable that was replaced in 1914 by a 60" turntable. Plans dated 1928 but with later 1930s notations show a platform building, goods shed, carriage shed (north of the station masters house), coal stage and engine shed (the coal stage marked on the plans as being removed in 1936), These plans are also annotated "Trucking yards removed and land sold to the Nowra Dairy Coy 7.7.1938". The jib crane is marked on these plans as being installed in 1934 adjacent to the goods shed and the shed extended in 1944.

The Coastal Farmers Co-operative Milk Company factory was built in 1912 with a siding adjacent to the yard and was rebuilt in 1938 by the Nowra Dairying Company.

In 1929 a vacuum oil siding was added and about the same time a private siding was branched off the yard towards the river to Horlickes Works and in 1956 extended to Wiggin’s Teape and Nash Paper Mills Ltd’s factories. Hayes and Kidd’s Siding was opened in 1953.

The original Bomaderry Railway Station platform building was destroyed by fire in 1945 and was replaced with the present brick Inter-war Functionalist style Platform building with steel cantilevered platform awning and steel-framed windows in 1945-46.

The carriage shed and engine shed have been removed from the yard (date unknown). The 1924 weighbridge, still extant, is no longer in RailCorp ownership. The former Nowra Dairy Co-op building (1938) is also still extant, however is also not in RailCorp ownership.

The Railway Station and yard group now includes the 1946 brick platform building and platform, the 1893 goods shed, 1934 Morris Bros. T 135, 8 ton jib crane, 1914 Sellers 60’-0 turntable, signals, the remaining goods yard with rail tracks and timber buffer stops.

Note: separate inventory forms cover the 1893 timber trestle bridge (4804454), and the 1924 railway crew barracks (4804456).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of institutions - productive and ornamental-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Engineering the public railway system-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Administering and alienating Crown lands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing civic infrastructure and amenity-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing private towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing the social life of a rural community-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creation of railway towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Evolution of railway towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Bomaderry Railway Station and Yard Group is of State historical significance as a significant collection of railway structures and machinery dating from 1893 to 1946 at an important terminus location with a significant history as a goods yard, and for its relationship with the development of Bomaderry and Nowra since 1893, including its role in the development of local industry.

The individual components of the site - the 1893 goods shed (extended in 1944), 1914 turntable, 1934 jib crane, and 1946 platform and platform building, horse dock, points and signals - illustrate aspects of the evolution of the station and yard since 1893, from steam to diesel train technology (despite the loss of the carriage shed, engine shed and coal stage and watering from the yard). Nearby related structures - the 1914 weighbridge and 1938 Nowra Dairy Co-op building - also add to the manner in which the site's history is evoked by extant structures.

Bomaderry Station Master's residence (1893) is of State historical significance as part of the overall Bomaderry Station Group as evidence of late 19th century railway operational requirements to accommodate railway staff on site at railway stations, as one of the few remaining structures at the Bomaderry railway terminus dating from the original period of construction of the Bomaderry Railway Station, and as an early example of a standard Station Master's residence design which formed a model for the later standard designs for such residences issued in 1899 by the office of Henry Deane, Engineer-in-Chief for Railways Construction, 1891-1901.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The design of the Bomaderry Station Master's residence has historical association with the office of Henry Deane, Engineer-in-Chief of Railways Construction for NSW Railways 1891-1901.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Bomaderry Railway Station 1946 platform building is of State aesthetic significance as one of the finest representative examples of an Inter-War Functionalist style Railway building in the state. It is particularly noteworthy for its use of curved elements, such as the projecting bay and awning.

Bomaderry Station Master's residence is of aesthetic significance as a simple vernacular weatherboard Victorian Georgian style house, purpose-built for the accommodation of railway staff.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Bomaderry turntable is rare (one of only 4 turntables now extant on the Illawarra line - Bomaderry, Wollongong, Waterfall and Kiama).

The Bomaderry goods shed is rare as only one of a few goods sheds that remain in the Metropolitan area, once a common structure at all major station sites (other similar example at Berry).

Bomaderry Station Master's residence is rare as one of the few remaining structures at the Bomaderry railway terminus dating from the original period of construction of the Bomaderry Railway Station in 1893 (the only other structures at Bomaderry form this period are the goods shed and timber trestle bridge). The Bomaderry Station Master's residence is one of five examples of its type of design of railway residence remaining in Government ownership in the Metropolitan network (the others being at Berry, Shellharbour, Morisset and Teralba).
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The Bomaderry Railway Station platform building is one of the finest representative examples of an Inter-War Functionalist style railway platform building in NSW.

The Bomaderry Station Master's residence is a representative early example a railway residence which predates the standard designs of 1899. Over 76 residences of this design were constructed by NSW Railways throughout the state, however many have since been demolished or sold for private use.
Integrity/Intactness: The Bomaderry Railway Station platform building is considered to have retained a high degree of external integrity. The interior fitout has been altered in 1994. The railway station yard has been altered over time, however retains extant structures covering the period from 1893 (goods shed) to 1946 (platform and platform building), despite some loss of structures from the yard relating to steam technology (carriage shed, engine shed, coal staging and watering structures have been removed from the yard). The Station Master's residence is intact.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0109002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental PlanIllawarra REP    
Local Environmental Plandraft amendment 212 (1985) (with DIPNR)    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
State Rail Authority Heritage Register Study1999 State Rail Authority  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenHeritage Division Rail Estate, State Rail Authority1993Heritage & Conservation Register State Rail Authority
WrittenLongworth, Jim2012Conservation Guide: Railway Gardens View detail
WrittenOffice of Rail Heritage2012Railway garden and landscape conservation guide
WrittenWalker, Meredith & Associates1991Heritage & Conservation Register for the State Rail Authority of NSW

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5011933
File number: H05/00001/


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