Cootamundra Railway Station and yard group | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Cootamundra Railway Station and yard group

Item details

Name of item: Cootamundra Railway Station and yard group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.6413428052 Long: 148.0303344120
Primary address: Main Southern railway, Cootamundra, NSW 2590
Local govt. area: Cootamundra-Gundagai Regional
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Young
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP1002942

Boundary:

The boundary of the listing is the SRA property boundaries along Victoria and Hovell Streets, the level crossing crossing the tracks at Mackay St to the south-west and a line crossing the tracks approximately 20 metres to the north-east of the end of the platform.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Main Southern railwayCootamundraCootamundra-Gundagai Regional  Primary Address
Hovell StreetCootamundraCootamundra-Gundagai Regional  Alternate Address
Victoria ParadeCootamundraCootamundra-Gundagai Regional  Alternate Address
Mackay StreetCootamundraCootamundra-Gundagai Regional  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government22 Oct 98

Statement of significance:

Cootamundra is a major railway complex with a variety of buildings and an unusually designed first class station building not seen elsewhere. It is of significance both in the townscape and in the development of railways. The railway yard extending for almost the length of the town along its eastern boundary is a major element in the development of the town and the station buildings are at the terminus of one of the main streets in the town. The station building and its major platform awning are of particular significance with very fine detail in both the building and the cast iron columns and brackets of the canopy. The station building has been substantially altered over its history and is an excellent example of the development of a major facility and the homogenous way in which buildings can grow. Of particular interest is the marking of the station entry with a tower over the entry vestibule. Another important feature of the site is the particularly fine awning to the branch platform with extensive use of cast iron panels and columns. This is one of the finest such awnings in the State. The other elements of the site contribute to the understanding of it and illustrate how a major railway centre operated and was developed. The site also contains a number of mature trees that provide a pleasant setting for the complex.
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1884-1943
Physical description: A major railway complex on the Main Southern line dating from a period of rapid railway expansion in NSW in the 1870s and 1880s. The Victorian Gothic station building is an excellent and unusual example of a first-class station building and is a major element in the Cootamundra townscape with a landmark tower marking the entry vestibule. The platform awning is also of aesthetic significance as a large and highly ornate structure with decorative cast iron columns and brackets. The quality and scale of the railway station demonstrates the importance attributed to this location during the late nineteenth century (SRA, 1999).

LANDSCAPE
trees

BUILDINGS
Station buildings
- type 5, first class brick building 1884, alterations 1904/5, 1915, 1943 (remodelled), RNE, Heritage Study (HS)
- additional awning for branch platform, Sydney end (particularly fine), 1894
Victorian Gothic style station building, an excellent example of a First-Class station building and a major element in the Cootamundra townscape, with its landmark tower marking the entry vestibule. Its quality and scale demonstrates the impnortance attributed to this location int he late 19th century (CHC&VIC, 2020, 5).

LANDSCAPING
Mature trees adjacent to the station provide a pleasant setting. Sympathetic timber picket fencing along platform, along with other metal rural railway fencing and gates. Rough rubble rock garden surrounds. Platform garden boxes modest/sympathetic.

STRUCTURES
Level crossing
Platform face - brick
Pedestrian footbridge - steel at south end
Turntable
Triangle junction

ARTEFACTS
Signs
Lights
(Continues into Historical Notes).

MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by RailCorp
Station Building - type 5, first-class (1888)
Refreshment Room (1929)
Platform Awning (c1894)

MAJOR STRUCTURES - Managed by ARTC
Signal Box - type O (1942)
Barracks (1927)

OTHER ITEMS - Managed by RailCorp
Up Platform (c1883)
Station signs
Station lights

OTHER ITEMS - Managed by ARTC
Island Platform (c.1943)
Footbridge (1918)
Level crossing
Turntable

STATION BUILDING (1888)
The station building presents as a grand one-storey Victorian Italianate style station building with large gabled roof and prominent two-storey tower over the vestibule which has an unusual octagonal structure with stucco trim. The station is constructed of face brick laid in Flemish bond with corrugated iron clad roof and bracketed eaves. Two transverse gable ends feature traceried bargeboards and porthole ventilators. Running between the gables and the tower are two bullnose verandahs each with timber posts and cast iron frieze and brackets.

The building features lower level attached wings to either side which have been altered from their original configuration. Original windows and doors are semicircular arched, while windows in the later additions are simple square head timber double hung windows and rendered sills. Corrugated iron awnings are mounted over some windows. Security frame installed to exterior windows match the original window panels and frames.

Major alterations to the station building took place in 1904-5, 1915 and 1943, all largely sympathetic to the original building. Plans dating c1922 show the building as internally comprising of a central public lobby and waiting room, a ladies waiting room, lavatories, a Station Master's office, booking office, and parcels office. Small metal ramp installed provides access to rooms (eg RRR).

RAILWAY REFRESHMENT ROOMS (1929)
The RRR is a simple one-storey building with an L-shape plan. The building is constructed of face brick with a low pitch gabled roof. Fenestration features timber double hung windows with multi paned top sashes. French doors with fanlights are located along the platform elevation. The building originally included a main refreshment room, a bar, kitchen and scullery, and a store room and detached out-of shed. The building is connected to the main station building by modern awnings as well as the original 1894 awnings. Interiors of RRR (now a cafe) have been altered. A portion of the old RRR bar has been retained and is in use.

PLATFORM AWNING (c1894)
On the platform side is a finely built platform awning supported on fluted cast iron columns with decorative cast iron brackets. The awning extends past the length of the buildings and features a simple timber valance to each end. Extensive modern awnings which mimic the form of the original building are located along the street faade.

SIGNAL BOX (1942)
Simple rectangular fibro structure with flat roof.

BARRACKS (1927)
The former barracks building faces Hovell Street, at the north-eastern or Sydney end of yard. It is a relatively large building (108' x 26') with brick walls and chimney, modern metal roof, timber veranda posts, and exposed rafters. There are two 7' wide verandahs off the amenities area (which includes a transverse passageway linking the bedroom area to the linen room and verandas). The kitchen and lavatory are accessed from each veranda with the dining room accessible from both verandas and located at the end of the building. Bedrooms are accessed from a central corridor. In 1937, an additional six bedrooms were provided. In 1991 the toilet block was demolished, and the building closed as resting accommodation, but later re-opened as a heritage/ tourist centre in c2001 (SRA, 1999).

Rail enthusiasts will appreciate the displays at the neighbouring Cootamundra Heritage Centre, located in the former 1927 built Cootamundra Railway Barracks and Rest House (CHC&VIC, 2020, 4).

PLATFORMS (c1883, c.1943)
The c1883 Up platform face has stone facing and has been extended in brick. It has also been raised 2-3 courses in brick. The platform features goose neck light poles and signage. The c.1943 Island platform is constructed of brick and is now landscaped with low hedging.
Modern bins, seats and signage.

FOOTBRIDGE (1918)
Steel girder design consisting of taper-haunched girders resting on platform trestles and brick piers. The stair features timber newel posts at the bottom of the stairs. Railway footbridge (overpass now) previously allowed access to the small narrow island platform. Steps to that platform now removed and platform disused. Timber deck present in footbridge, along with old newels and old handrails (SRA, 1999).

MOVABLE
Seth Thomas clock "1423" in Travel Centre
Decorative gooseneck light posts
Recent period-style timber fencing
Granite-edged garden beds
Cast concrete keg-style platform flower pots
Wedderburn scales
Cast iron Ajax safe still in use in the baggage rooms
Display of semaphore signals mounted onto early steel staunchion
Three trikes on display on verandah
Cast iron and concrete door thresholds and boot scrapers
Timber benches
Museum display of refreshment room objects, lamps, signs, framed photos and prints and ex-railway objects in ex-barracks buildings
Metal stove hood, ex-refreshment room
Bakelite lights and switches and timber mounting blocks
Blue CountryLink luggage trolleys
Large electric Timetic double-sided platform clock, working
"Cootamundra" incised timber platform benches
Wrought iron and timber platform bench in front garden
Timber and iron window hoods
Wall-mounted flag pole
Galvanised steel and wire farm gates
Small steel and timber platform in yard
Plaque - "Centenary of Rail Services 1 November 1977"
Plaque - "Opening of Tourist Information Centre 21 April 1992" (SRA, 1999).
Modifications and dates: 1889 Engine shed constructed
1891 15.2m diameter turntable fixed
1898 Engine shed extended.

1901 Station layout altered with an island platform
1902 Ash pit in the track built at Sydney end of platform.
1907 Transhipping shed provided.
1907 Traffic and Permanent Way Inspectors' offices provided.
1910 18.288m diameter turntable fixed
1913 Additional rest house accommodation provided.

1922 Railway Institute building constructed.
1927 10-room rest house built.

1967 Wheat depot erected.

c2001-2 Barracks adaptively reused as the Cootamundra Heritage Centre (a museum)
2007 Signal gantry relocated behind barracks. Signal box decommissioned.
n.d. Former gatekeeper's residence sold for private ownership.
Further information: The large signal gantry was relocated in 2007 and placed on display in its present position behind the barracks. Signal box decommissioned 2007. The former gatekeeper's residence is privately owned.
Current use: railway station and yard
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, railway station and yard

History

Historical notes: ABORIGINAL LAND
The traditional owners of Cootamundra are the Wiradjuri, for whom the Murrumbidgee River was a plentiful source of shellfish and fish. Plants, tubers and nuts of the country between the major rivers supplied seasonal food. Larger game such as possums, kangaroos and emus were captured by groups of hunters to make up a varied and nutritious diet. (Heritage Branch, 1996, p132).

The dislocation by European colonists of normal Aboriginal routines of life was increasingly severe from the 1830s and the new diseases took a terrible toll. There were predictable problems over cattle. A series of incidents along the Murrumbidgee near Narrandera c1840 have been called the 'Wiradjuri wars'. The end result was that the Wiradjuri were deprived of their riverine territory and driven to the hills or to local employment on the stations. Men worked as cattlemen, general hands, sheep-shearers and flour grinders, and women as domestic servants and child carers. Ultimately many Wiradjuri people ended up living in the towns established to service those who had supplanted them. By the late nineteenth century few of the surviving Wiradjuri people lived a traditional life. The numerous towns of the area, which became closely settled with irrigation schemes during the twentieth century, contained an increasing Aboriginal population. Today in the region, most Wiradjuri people live in Narrandera and Griffith, with significant numbers in Wagga Wagga, Leeton and Tumut and smaller communities in Junee, Harden, Young and Cootamundra (Heritage Branch, 1996, p132-133).

The name Cootamundra was likely derived from the Wiradjuri word guudhamang for 'turtle', as the town is aroudn a low-lying marshland, which is ideal turtle habitat (Cootamundra Heritage Centre & Visitor Information Centre, 2020, 1).

COLONISATION AND EARLY HISTORY OF COOTAMUNDRA
In 1829 the first British explorer Charles Sturt ventured into the Murrumbidgee Valley. Within 15 years most of the water frontages along the Murrumbidgee were occupied by pastoralists. John Hurley and Patrick Fennell obtained permissions to pasture stock on the Coramundra Run in the 1830s, which by 1849 had grown to 50,000 acres with an estimated grazing capacity of 600 cattle and 3000 sheep (Caskie, 2000, 1; CLHS, 2008). Meat prices soared in the 1850s and the Murrumbidgee stations 'became a vast fattening paddock'.

Cootamundry was surveyed and a plan of the proposed village was drawn up by surveyor P. Adams in 1861 on a site that was originally the horse paddock of John Hurley's station. The first town lots were sold in 1862. Like many other towns in the Riverina, Cootamundra's population increased with the brief gold rush of the 1860s. By 1866, the village had a population of 100, a post office, a police station and two hotels. The succeeding decades saw the triumph of sheep over cattle particularly on the saltbush plains at the western end of the region. The corollary of this pastoral expansion was the clearing of much of the bush, the sinking of wells, the building of dams for stock and the systematic fencing of paddocks. (Heritage Branch, 1996, p133-5; Wikipedia, 'Cootamundra').

The rail network helped in the growth of farming industries. Cootamundra's train station, linking into the main southern railway that links Sydney and Melbourne, opened in 1877. The development of Cootamundra was slow and steady and it was gazetted on May 20, 1884 as a municipality of 3010 acres (CLHS, 2008).

The town was finally gazetted as Cootamundra in 1952, changed from the official name of Cootamundry by which it had been known since 1860. The locals had always used the name Cootamundra (CLHS 2008). It became a quiet yet prosperous agricultural community. Today, Cootamundra has a population of around 7500 in the whole shire with a further 2000 in the surrounding district. (CSC, 2009)(Rappoport, 2011, p22-23).

Railway History:
Cootamundra Railway Precinct is located on the Main South line.

Contracts were let in 1877 for construction of a temporary timber station building, goods shed, and Station Master's residence, with Cootamundra station opening on 1 November 1877. The line from Harden to Cootamundra was opened by Mr. John Lackey, Minister for Justice & Education, who, along with the Commissioner for Railways, John Rae and other dignitaries, led a procession through Cootamundra before attending a banquet and ball in the newly constructed goods shed (Forsyth, 1989).

Early additions or improvements at Cootamundra included barracks, a coal stage and turntable (1877) (the barracks were relocated from Harden and then, along with the coal stage, moved to Bethungra in 1878), stockyards, a lamp room (1878), gatehouse at Gundagai Road level crossing (1879), 10 tonne cart weighbridge, office and 5 tonne crane (1880), erection of fences and name boards (1881) and lengthening of the platform (1883). In 1888 a new grand Victorian Italianate station building replaced the original timber building (Forsyth, 1989).

In 1901, alterations were made to the station layout, including the addition of an island platform between the then single Main line and the Branch line to Gundagai. In 1911, a triangle loop was opened for traffic to give access to and from the branch line but was suspended in 1914 due to the cost of providing staff at two signal boxes. In 1917, duplication of the main line was introduced from Wamba Loop to Cootamundra North Junction, and a footbridge constructed across the yard in 1918. A new 10-room barracks was constructed in 1927, and in 1929 the present refreshment rooms replaced the original refreshment rooms.

Further remodelling of the Cootamundra yard also took place in association with duplication works between Cootamundra North to Cootamundra South in 1943, and Cootamundra South to Tanyinna in 1942 (Forsyth, 1989).
In 1943: Main line south of Cootamundra North Junction to Tumut Junction duplicated and the yard completely remodelled. Two through main lines were provided, with two loops, the original Main line platform was extended and signalled for trains in either direction to serve stopping passenger trains as it had the station facilities and refreshment room. The old small island platform was removed and replaced (LEP, 2013).

Other significant changes within the Cootamundra yard included many attempts to secure a reliable water supply for steam locomotives. Despite initially sourcing water from Jindalee Creek, problems with the water supply continued for many years. In 1877 a 45kl tank was erected and was augmented by a 63kl tank in 1883. In 1907 a circular 90kl tank and two jibs were erected between depot tracks, in 1908 a water column erected at the north end of the platform, and in 1911 two new water tanks erected at the North Junction. Water was also carried from Gundagai for several years and in 1919 a 45kl tank and water column erected at the north end of the platform. In 1920 a 180kl tank was transferred from Muswellbrook to Cootamundra, in 1922 a bore was used, in 1923 a well was sunk, and in 1926 a reservoir was established. Further efforts were made to secure water supplies in the late 1920s and in 1930, including the addition of a 90kl excavated tank and pumping plant in 1927 (Forsyth, 1989).

Cootamundra remains an important, although much altered, operational railway station and yard (SRA, 1999).

Cootamundra West Railway Station opened in 1911.

The town was heavily influenced by the railway due to its location on the Main Southern Line. With two railway stations, a pedestrian overbridge and numerous over- and under-bridges, Cootamundra is a train-spotter's delight (CHC&VIC, 2020, 1).

COOTAMUNDRA EARLY AVIATION HISTORY
The aviation history of Cootamundra began in 1917 when Mr W.J. Stutt landed in a paddock near the Cootamundra Showground in his Curtiss biplane during a flight that established a long-distance record for Australia (Windsor and Richmond Gazette Friday 16 November 1917).

By 1921 the strategic advantage of Cootamundra's location about mid-way between Sydney and Melbourne led to the Australian Government purchasing 75 acres of Quinlan's paddock on the northern edge of the town, making Cootamundra one of NSW's earliest rural aerodromes (Dannecker, 1976, 4-8, quoted in Rappoport, 2011, p37-38). With the implementation of an airmail service between Australia and Britain, Cootamundra was chosen as the southern terminus. The airfield was used as a base for airmail contracts temporarily from 1934 by Butler Air Transport, providing connection to QANTAS services between Brisbane and Darwin. However the company relocated its base to Sydney when the airmail contract was withdrawn in 1938 (Wikipedia "Cootamundra Airport").

WORLD WAR II AND AVIATION IN AUSTRALIA
When Australia entered World War II in September 1939 on the side of Great Britain, the war was far distant in Europe. However Australia soon became part of an international scheme to train pilots and aircrew across the British Empire. Known as the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS), the scheme was instrumental in up-skilling many of the airmen who fought in Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean (Kass, in Robertson & Hindmarsh, Vol.2, 41-4).

The railway station remains a working station and a major element in the Cootamundra townscape (CHC&VIC, 2020, 5).

Cootamundra Heritage Centre:
Rail enthusiasts will appreciate the displays at the neighbouring Cootamundra Heritage Centre, located in the former 1927 built Cootamundra Railway Barracks and Rest House. The centre is operated by a small committee and team of dedicated volunteers (CHC&VIC, 2020, 4).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of institutions - productive and ornamental-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on rural development-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Railway work culture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and administering rail networks-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Arts and Crafts-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This item is assessed as historically rare. This item is assessed as scientifically rare. This item is assessed as arch. rare. This item is assessed as socially rare.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

1. Conservation principles: Conserve cultural heritage significance and minimise impacts on heritage values and fabric in accordance with the 'Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance'. 2. Specialist advice: Seek advice from a qualified heritage specialist during all phases of a proposed project from feasibility, concept and option planning stage; detailed design; heritage approval and assessment; through to construction and finalisation. 3. Documentation: Prepare a Statement of Heritage Impact (SOHI) to assess, minimise and prevent heritage impacts as part of the assessment and approval phase of a project. Prepare a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prior to proposing major works (such as new additions, change of use or proposed demolition) at all places of State significance and all complex sites of Local significance. 4. Maintenance and repair: Undertake annual inspections and proactive routine maintenance works to conserve heritage fabric in accordance with the 'Minimum Standards of Maintenance & Repair'. 5. Movable heritage: Retain in situ and care for historic contents, fixtures, fittings, equipment and objects which contribute to cultural heritage significance. Return or reinstate missing features or relocated items where opportunities arise. 6. Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage: Consider all aspects of potential heritage significance as part of assessing and minimising potential impacts, including Aboriginal, archaeology and natural heritage. 7. Unidentified heritage items: Heritage inventory sheets do not describe or capture all contributory heritage items within an identified curtilage (such as minor buildings, structures, archaeology, landscape elements, movable heritage and significant interiors and finishes). Ensure heritage advice is sought on all proposed changes within a curtilage to conserve heritage significance. 8. Recording and register update: Record changes at heritage places through adequate project records and archival photography. Notify all changes to the Section 170 Heritage & Conservation Register administrator upon project completion.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0111802 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental PlanCootamundra Local Environmental Plan 2013 26 Jul 13   
Register of the National EstateCootamundra Railway Station70221 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
S170 Register Update Project2009 ARTC/ ORH  Yes
SRA Heritage Register Study1999SRA261SRA  No
Cootamundra Shire Heritage Study2010 Kabaila, Peter  Yes
Heritage Platforms Conservation Management Strategy2015 Australian Museum Consulting  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCaskie, Patricia2000Cootamundra (1901-1924): Past Imperfect
WrittenCootamundra Heritage Centre & Visitor Information Centre,2020'About Cootamundra'; 'Cootamundra Heritage Centre'; 'Cootamundra Railway Station' View detail
WrittenCootamundra Local History Society (CLSH)2008Cootamundra History Highlights: A selection of events in the history of Cootamundra
WrittenCottee, J.M.2004Stations on the track: selected New South Wales country railway stations: an historical overview
WrittenForsyth, J.H.2009NSW Railway Stations - An Alphabetical Arrangement of Railway Station and Place Names
WrittenForsyth, J.H.1989Stations and tracks: volume 2: Main Southern Line: Granville Junction to Albury
WrittenHeritage Branch1996Regional Histories of New South Wales
WrittenKass, Terry, in Robertson & Hindmarsh2006"Vol.2 Thematic History" in World Wars I and 2 Survey of Buildings Sites and Cultural Landscapes in NSW(Thematic Study)
WrittenMcKillop, Robert2009NSW Railways (RailCorp) Thematic History
WrittenOffice of Railway Heritage2012Railway garden and landscape conservation guide
WrittenRappoport P/L2011Conservation Management Plan No.3 Inland Aircraft Fuel Depot, Cootamundra NSW
WrittenScobie, David; Love; and Ellsmore, Donald2004Cootamundra Railway Station Crew Barracks CMP
WrittenState Rail Authority of NSW Archives1993How and why of station names
WrittenWard, D. & ARTC2009Heritage Study: railway barracks in country NSW

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5011976


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