Galong Railway Station and yard group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Galong Railway Station and yard group

Item details

Name of item: Galong Railway Station and yard group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.6040736232 Long: 148.5585650466
Primary address: Main Southern railway, Galong, NSW 2585
Local govt. area: Harden
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Onerwal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT3 DP819818

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by the property boundary to the south running parallel to the railway track (Station Street), the overbridge to the west, the property boundary to the north and the eastern boundary is the Sydney end of the station platform.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Main Southern railwayGalongHarden  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government28 Oct 98

Statement of significance:

Galong station and yard group is an excellent example of a location which was constructed largely at the same time and retains that form to the present day. It is a good example of deviation site where the former wayside platform was replaced with 2 platforms and 2 buildings when the line was duplicated and deviated in 1915. The station buildings are excellent examples of standard buildings constructed in a country location, only a few of which survive (e.g. Binalong). It is a good and rare surviving country example of a signal box constructed as part of the main station building, again a result of the common building time of the structures. As a junction station for the Boorowa branch (now closed) the site had an importance that is reflected in the quality of the structures, particularly for buildings built as late as 1915 when most locations were suffering from cutbacks and rationalised construction. It is one of the finest country examples of buildings from this period. The ancillary structures such as weighbridge, gantry crane and goods shed are significant to the whole and are good examples of their type, strengthening the significance of the group. The residence is a remnant of the original 1877 station and is significant because of this connection.
Date significance updated: 27 Nov 00
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1880-1915
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Station buildings comprise:
- type 11, initial island side platform (northbound trains), 1915
- type 11, initial island side platform (southbound trains) including signal box in station building, 1915
- Out of shed - brick on southbound platform 1915
- Goods shed - 61x16 sub-type 3 side shed - This is a typical small country side shed constructed of corrugated iron walling and roof with overhang to both platform and road sides. It has a platform to each face. The structure is supported on stumps.
- Residence - 1877 (SRA, 1999) - timber type 5. The residence was built for the earlier station location which was relocated at the time of duplication in 1915. The building dates from the 1880s. It is a simple timber L-shaped building with corrugated iron roof projecting front room with gable roof, the other roofs being hipped, a front entrance verandah linking to the projecting bay and a rear skillion skillion section containing amenities. It is typical of many sirnilar structures throughout the state. It is of particular interest on this site as the only remaining structure from the early period of construction.

The station group is an excellent example of a location which was constructed largely at the same time and retains that form to the present day. It is a good example of deviation site where the former wayside platform was replaced with 2 platforms and 2 buildings when the line was duplicated and deviated in 1915 (SRA, 1999).

The station buildings constructed are austere examples of standard buildings, typical of the later use of these standard forms of building which were developed in the 1890s. They are also unusual in that not many examples of buildings of this style were built or survive in the country. The main building is a 9 bay station building with little decoration around openings and the use of concrete lintels. The attached signal frame, under the main roof of the building is enclosed with a timber and glazed screen. The awning is simply bracketed with curved steel angle supports. The minor station building is of the same design but is much smaller containing only a waiting room. Access between platforms is across the tracks which is unusual for a junction station.

All access to the buildings is from the platforms with a defined entry point at one end of the station. The planning is linear. The parcels office at the far end of the platform is consistent in materials and detailing with the station buildings and forms an integral part of the group.

STRUCTURES
Platform faces - brick, 1915. The platform faces are brick with a rich coping, all of which were constructed at one time with the buildings. The platform is an excellent example of its type particularly as it is constructed on the curve.

Weighbridge - 14062 Pooley 20 ton - no longer extant, possibly removed c1993 with transfer of part of railway land to Graincorp. A typical example of a country weighbridge of significance as part of the whole group. It is in particularly good condition.

Gantry Crane - The crane in this location is a gantry crane located some distance from the goods shed which indicates the type of goods that was loaded from the yard. The gantry crane is intact and is a rare surviving example of this type of crane.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm

History

Historical notes: Galong is believed to be the local Aboriginal word for 'flying fox' or 'swamp plains' and was used as the name of Edward Ryan's 1836 selection (Forsyth, 1989; SRA, 1993).

Galong House/estate:
Galong was settled and named by Irish transportee, Edward 'Ned' Ryan in the late 1820s (AGHS, 2018). Galong House, later Galong Castle, was noted for its hospitality to rich and poor alike. It was a port of call and a haven of rest to the early priests on their journeys in the days when accommodation was the scarcest thing in the land (Kass, 2009).

By 1850, when the surveyor J. Larmer prepared a map of the Lachlan squatting district showing the positions of stations and proposed reserves for towns and villages, Ryan was shown as owner of four stations: Jaraldara (now Geraldra), Burthong (now Berthong), Tumatel, and Nubba. Gungewalla and Jallong (Galong) stations are also indicated and although Ryan is not named as lessee an 1866 Gazetteer indicated that both were still then occupied by Ryans, the latter by Edward (40 960acres), and the former by his son John Nagle (17 280 acres). About 1859 the two-storied, crenellated eastern tower was added to provide a dining room and visitor's bedroom, and from this date the appellation of 'castle' was bestowed on the homestead (ibid, 2009).

John Nagle Ryan took over the management of Galong on his father's death in February 1871. John, in turn, died sixteen years later (1887) and left Galong Castle estate to his sister Anastasia Nagle Ryan (ibid, 2009). The western tower was begun in 1887 on John's death to accommodate, at Anastasia Nagle Ryan's direction, a priest's chapel and bedroom. When Anastasia Ryan died it was the Redemptorist Order who claimed Galong and their monastery buildings now surround and engulf the original homestead (ibid). The order established a monastery and a jevenate named for St. Clement Hofbauer (AGHS, 2018). The western tower was in turn enlarged by the Redemptorist Order in 1931-2 to accommodate a library. The Redemptorists also demolished the two-feet thick internal stone walls of the homestead to allow for its use as a dining-room and common room. Photographs taken between 1870 and 1920 illustrate how this simple, somewhat quaint vernacular building became surrounded and enveloped by the monastery (Kass, 2009).

Over 2000 men were educated at Galong before the College closed in 1975 and a retreat and conference centre was eventually established. Following on from the Ryan family's tradition of agriculture, the Redemptorist priests, brothers and students and now the Friends of St. Clement's ensure the farm's viability and sustainability through the implementation of an extensive environmental plan. The Friends consider St.Clement's a sanctuary for the soul and the environment, with friends and visitors encouraged to adopt an established tree providing for its care and ultimate replacement, or by planting a new tree in many groves still to be established (AGHS, 2018).

Galong town:
The town became a rail location in the 1870s as part of the development of the Great Southern Line. The Great Southern Line had reached Goulburn in May 1869, Gunning in November 1875, Yass (later 'Yass Junction') in 1878, Bowning in July 1876 and Galong in 1877, with the station opening on 12 March 1877. The Great Southern Line later extended to Cootamundra (1877), Junee (1878), Wagga (1879), and finally Albury in 1881 (SRA, 1993).

The original railway yard at Galong opened on 12 March 1877 with a 67 metre long platform on the Down side of the main line and a loop on the Up side. Some of the early additions at the first site included a waiting shed in 1879, various yard alterations (1891) and the construction of trucking yards (1893). The station closed and was relocated as part of the deviation of the line in April 1916, with the second site opening on 16 April 1916, approximately 19 kilometres from the original location. The relocated site included sheep and cattle yards, a loading bank, residence (1916), wheat stacking site (1917), a permanent junction for the Boorowa Branch line (1917), a 10 tonne gantry crane (1917), and a gate house (1921) (Forsyth, 1989).

The Galong Public School was established in 1890.

Galong Railway Station residence is the only building surviving from the 1880s. It was built for the earlier station location which was relocated at the time of duplication of the railway line in 1915. Most of the station dates to 1915 (SRA, 1993).

The railway station closed in 1980 (Forsyth, 1989; SRA, 1993), with closure of the Galong- line.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Railway Station-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing rail transport-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This item is assessed as historically rare. This item is assessed as arch. rare. This item is assessed as socially rare.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0114602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenForsyth, Forsyth, J.H.1989Stations & tracks: volume 2: Main Southern Line Granville Junction to Albury.
WrittenState Rail Authority of NSW1993How and why of station names

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5012011


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