Moss Vale Railway Station and yard group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Moss Vale Railway Station and yard group

Item details

Name of item: Moss Vale Railway Station and yard group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.5476521670 Long: 150.3721100490
Primary address: Main Southern railway, Moss Vale, NSW 2577
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP1173719
LOT2 DP1173719
PART LOT3 DP1173719
LOT4 DP1173719
LOT8 DP832397
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Main Southern railwayMoss ValeWingecarribee  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government05 Nov 98

Statement of significance:

Moss Vale is one of the most important station groups in the State. It contains rare examples of early buildings, various later structures, vice-regal buildings, unique entry arrangement, very high quality buildings and the remains of a working yard seen in the signal box and embankments. The early elements of the site are significant buildings in their own right.The site has excellent interiors along with the outstanding architecture and gives many opportunities to demonstrate the wealth and range of railway structures and the importance of rail travel in the past. The site has a strong social historical connection through use by the Governors and is an important focal point of the town of Moss Vale.
Date significance updated: 15 Nov 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Whitton (station master's house)
Builder/Maker: A Elphinstone (station building)
Construction years: 1867-1915
Physical description: LANDSCAPE
Pedestrian approach from east side past the war memorial, post office and Sttaion Master's residence via overhead footbridge, brick walls and embankments, forecourt.

BUILDINGS
Station buildings, RNE, HS
- 2nd class brick, built by W + A Elphinstone, 1867. Has an elaborate restroom with high ceilings, plaster ceilings, Corinthian column capitals on pilasters, timber service counter, floor (Emery, 2001, photograph: interpreted by Stuart Read, 9/1/2018)
- booking office brick, 1915
- alterations to station building, including improvements to Governor's waiting room and chandeliers, 1890*

- misc buildings, men's toilet and covered passageways
- awning to down platform 1914

*private vice-regal rooms. No other such waiting rooms exist on the rail system, making them unique in terms of railway heritage (Emery, 2001).

Hotel and refreshment room, 2 storey,1891
- alterations to refreshment room, convert bar to dining and construct new bar, 1919

Signal box - hip roof timber two storey in yard, type 4, 1915

Residences
- Argyle St,1915

STRUCTURES
platforms
- up, brick, lengthened in 1882,
- new down platform constructed in 1914 for duplication with road bridge access and car turning area specifically for Governor Strickland's invalid daughter to gain access to train.

dock platform
pedestrian bridges - 2 metal framed, 1915
road overbridge - up end
weighbridge
triangle to turn 57 class locomotives
road approach

ARTEFACTS
signs

Station Master's residence
Completed in 1874, it was based on a standard design from the office of Commissioner John Whitton.
Modifications and dates: Station Master's residence
The building has since been added to on several occasions.

In 1918, the Residence was converted for use as dormitory for female staff employed within the Railway Refreshment Room. An entrance porch was added in 1926 and a temporary structure was proposed in 1942 for additional staff accommodation to cope with the extra volume of WW2 traffic. It is not known whether this was built.

The Residence was adapted again, in 1952, into two separate apartments for railway staff. The works included the installation of timber partitions, an access cut through the northern wall and new internal door openings.
A description of the building is given in the Wingecarribee Heritage Survey 1991:

'A small Victorian cottage with characteristic gothic features and detailing including steeply pitched gabled roofs (clad in corrugated steel) with ornamental fretwork barges and finials, deep set, narrow sash windows, a bay window to the central projecting gable and the use of rusticated stone dressings (now painted) as quoins and around windows and doors.
Stonework crosses also feature in the needs of the transverse gables while a shield with the date '1869' is fixed to the central projecting gable (above the bay window). The rear of the cottage features [a] simpler faade and fenestration detailing (as well as a fibro extension).'

In 1994 the Residence was leased to the Wingecarribee Shire Council to house the Southern Highlands Regional Gallery. Works undertaken during this period included the erection of a new pergola and a new southern extension and the removal of the eastern Railway outbuildings. All the internal doors were removed for ease of movement through the gallery.

The building is currently used for residential purposes (2001 HC report).
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, railway station

History

Historical notes: Moss Vale:
In 1850 the vale (that would become known as Moss Vale) looked very much as it had since white settlers first began farming there 30 years before. The large Throsby Park estate spread for several thousand acres. Dr Charles Throsby had settled the land in 1819 and by 1850, his nephew and heir Charles had transformed the property into the finest in the district. The adjacent Hutchinson estate ran to White's Creek. Convict William Hutchinson was transported to NSW in 1799, one of the more successful emancipists. He prospered under Governor Macquarie's patronage and was appointed to the important position of Principal Superintendent of Convicts in 1814 and later active in establishing the Bank of NSW. South of White's Creek lay Browley, another early land grant in the area, to John Waite, long-time servant of Dr Charles Throsby, who received his 100 acre parcel of land in recognition of his outstanding service to Throsby on his journeys of exploration. He prospered, acquiring much more land, and became one of the leading local settlers. It was on these three estates that Moss Vale would develop (Emery, 2001, 82).

For Moss Vale's development, 1867 was a momentous year. In December, the newly-completed railway line from Sydney opened and in anticipation fo an influx of people, the owners of the large estates began subdividing, with the first town plots sold in 1863. By the time the station opened in 1867, the town had a store, postal service and hotel, mainly to cater for the needs of the large number of railway workers and their families who had come to the district. Their small tent communities had sprung up all along the Great Southern Railway line as it forged south to Goulburn. Lewis Levy from Berrima opened the first store, having cannily anticipated the decline in business in Berrima once it was bypassed by the railway. Business people of Sutton Forest saw Moss Vale's potential as the future centre of the district and many of the first land buyers in Moss Vale were Sutton Forest and Berrima people (ibid, 2001, 82).

Moss Vale Railway Station:
The first plans for a railway through Moss Vale district were made on 26th August 1846. A survey of the area was carried out in 1848. The railway line stopped at Campbelltown until 1863. The state government was unsure as to whether steam trains would be able to travel further (Sheedy, 1988).

The Engineer in chief for the project was John Whitton. The Railways plan was drawn up in 1860 for the line to continue to Picton with an extension to Goulburn. There were in all seven sections to be completed. The fifth section extended approximately four miles north of Moss Vale. This line opened on 2nd December 1867.The name given to the Station was Sutton's Forest. This was a remnant of the name given to the area by Governor Macquarie in 1820. All trains terminated at Sutton's Forest until the Marulan line was opened on 6th August 1868. The Goulburn line (through Moss Vale) was completed in 1876 (ibid, 1988).

The coming of the railway provided the impetus for the establishment of the township (ibid, 2001, 82). The station's name of Sutton's Forest was officially changed to Moss Vale in 1877, after the local innkeeper Jimmy Moss (ibid, 1988). Emery (2001, 82) calls him Jemmy Moss, noting he was an ex-convict servant of Charles Throsby who lived in a hut on Throsby land in what is now Spring Street (Moss Vale). Moss was transported to NSW for seven years in 1828 for stealing, but became a valued employee of Throsby's family from about the late 1830s. When the survey for subdivision of part of the (Throsby Park) estate began in the 1860s, Jemmy and his wife Mary Ann were apparently very concerned. The story goes that Moss asked Oliver Throsby if their home was to be taken away, but was reassured that 'as long as your name is Moss and mine is Throsby, this place is yours'. Moss died in 1867 and was buried in Berrima Cemetery (ibid, 2001, 82).

Initially, the town suffered from something of an identity crisis, with the naming of the railway station as Sutton Forest. The subdivision of part of the Browley estate was named the village of Sutton Forest North, while the Post Office preferred Moss Vale (as a name). It was not until 1877 that the station was officially renamed Moss Vale, probably reflecting what was the favoured local choice, but also to avoid confusion with the original Sutton Forest village a few kilometers further south. By this time, Moss Vale was showing all the signs of a town on the move. The opening up of the Yarrawa Brush (rainforest, for clearing for farming) during the 1860s - the Robertson, Burrawang and Wildes's Meadow area - added to the importance of the rail head at Moss Vale, which became the district centre for sending produce and other freight to the Sydney market (ibid, 2001, 82).

By the late 1870s, Moss Vale, like neighbouring Bowral, was experiencing the first influences of tourism. Who coined the phrase 'Sanitorium of the South' to describe the district is not known, but it achieved the desired effect, and summer-weary souls of Sydney soon took to the cooler Highland climate. The Earl of Belmore, Governor of NSW from 1867-72 beggan the vice-regal assocation with Moss Vale when he leased Throsby Park as a country residence. His successor, Sir Hercules Robinson, also retreated to the Highlands from time to time, but it wasn't until 1882 that a property was purchased by the NSW government specifically for use as a vice-regal retreat. 'Prospect', the Sutton Forest home of R.P.Richardson (of Richardson & Wrench (real estate agents) fame) was chosen as the official summer residence, renamed Hillview and for the next 75 years saw the comings and goings of some 16 state governors (ibid, 2001, 82).

The continuing growth of South Western NSW saw the rail link between Yass and Albury opened on 14th June 1883 (ibid, 1988).

Being the closest railway station to Hillview, Moss Vale was where the governor and entourage would arrive. In 1891, a magnificent state (railway) car was built at Eveleigh Railway Workshops in Sydney for the express purpose of bringing the Governor to the Southern Highlands. The opulent carriage had three compartments, the main saloon, a boudoir and a smoking room. Built from Australian timbers (silky oak, blackwood, myall and kauri), its furnishings included silk-apolstered chairts and sofas and tables of enamelled woodwork. When the Governor arrived at Moss Vale, he could retire to private vice-regal rooms at the station, before taking the journey by road to Hillview. No other such waiting rooms exist on the rail system, making them unique in terms of railway heritage. The stage carriage is now housed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney (ibid, 2001).

On 3rd January, 1962 the first train ran from Sydney to Melbourne on a standard gauge railway line (ibid, 1988).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Railway Station-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining the public railway system-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on rural development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Evolution of railway towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planning relationships between key structures and town plans-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing private towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Railways to inland settlements-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Railway work culture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and administering rail networks-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Arts and Crafts-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Whitton, Chief Engineer, NSW Government Railways-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This item is assessed as historically rare. This item is assessed as scientifically rare. This item is assessed as arch. rare. This item is assessed as socially rare.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0120002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental PlanIllawarra REP no. 1 11 Apr 86   
Local Environmental Plan  12 Jan 90 7 
National Trust of Australia register  417009 Nov 81   
Royal Australian Institute of Architects registerSouth Wing    

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAllman Johnston Architects1999Statement to accompany Development Application for the adaptive reuse of Former Refreshment Room Building
TourismAttraction Homepage2007  View detail
WrittenDavid Sheedy Pty. Ltd.1988Moss Vale railway station; conservation and management plan
WrittenEmery, Linda2001'Moss Vale: historic places in the Southern Highlands - occasional series'
WrittenPeter Freeman P/L Conservation Architects & Planners1998Moss Vale Railway Station Precinct Conservation Management Plan
WrittenState Rail Authority of NSW Author: State Rail Authority of New South Wales.; Publisher:1994Strategic property plan - Moss Vale

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5012110
File number: 12/12043 , H00/00129


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