Scarborough Railway Station group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Scarborough Railway Station group

Item details

Name of item: Scarborough Railway Station group
Other name/s: Clifton
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.2661826548 Long: 150.9646318200
Primary address: First Street, Scarborough, NSW 2515
Local govt. area: Wollongong City
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra

Boundary:

North: 5m north of the platform end; East: 10m from rail corridor (excluding Station Master's residence) along Lawrence Hargrave Drive; South: 5m south of the platform end (excluding overbridge); West: boundary of railway property fronting Railway Avenue (including landscape).
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
First StreetScarboroughWollongong City  Primary Address
Illawarra railwayScarboroughWollongong City  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government16 Nov 98

Statement of significance:

Scarborough Railway Station - including its platforms, platform buildings and out-of-room - is of historical significance for its role as a transport hub for the village of Scarborough since 1915, and its historical links to the earlier station locations. Scarborough Railway Station is also of historical significance for its association with the development of Scarborough as a tourist resort since the early 20th century. Scarborough Railway Station is of aesthetic significance as an intact group of railway structures dating from the 1915 duplication of the Illawarra line, which are good representative standard platform buildings of this period.
Date significance updated: 08 May 13
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: N.S.W. Government Railway
Builder/Maker: N.S.W. Government Railway
Construction years: 1915-1916
Physical description: PRECINCT ELEMENTS
Platform 1 Building (1915) (type 11)
Platform 2 Building (1915) (type 11)
Out of room (1915) Platform 2
Pedestrian stairs (modern) Platform 2

CONTEXT
Scarborough Railway Station has two perimeter platforms, with Platform 1 on the west, Platform 2 on the east. The perimeters of the station are defined with dark green powder coated aluminium fencing. Platform 2 is accessed either via a driveway off First Street, or adjacent modern stairs, to the northeast of the First Street overbridge. The west platform (Platform 1) is accessed via Railway Avenue to the west or by crossing the First Street overbridge.

PLATFORM 1 BUILDING (1915)
Exterior: The Platform 1 (west) building is a gabled face brick building with an awning on the east (Platform) side, corrugated steel roofing and a skillion corrugated steel roof to platform awning. The building has no chimneys. Gable ends feature rectangular timber louvred vents. Walls feature sandstone reveals and sills to windows and sandstone door reveals, and a sandstone corbel at door header height. There is a corrugated steel screen added to the north end of the building. The building features timber framed double hung windows with 9-paned top sashes with coloured glass panes to most. The awning is cantilevered on steel brackets mounted on decorative sandstone brackets. Doors are timber flush with 6-paned fanlights with coloured glass panes.

Interior: Reportedly the interior contains a Station Master’s office, waiting room and men’s toilet.

PLATFORM 2 BUILDING (1915)
Exterior: The (east) Platform 2 building is a gabled brick building with a cantilevered platform awning, gabled corrugated steel roofing, skillion corrugated steel awning roof, and a corrugated steel screen added to north end. There are no chimneys to the roof. The walls are painted to south and east elevations, with original face brick to west (platform) and north elevations. The walls feature sandstone reveals and sills to windows and sandstone door reveals, and a sandstone corbel at door header height. The building features timber framed double hung windows, with 9-paned top sashes with coloured glass panes to most. The awning is cantilevered on steel brackets mounted on decorative sandstone wall brackets. Doors are modern timber flush doors with original 6-paned fanlights with coloured glass panes. The building has timber exposed rafter ends. There are no vents to gable ends.

Interior: Reportedly the interior contains a Station Master’s office, waiting room and men’s toilet.

OUT OF ROOM (1915)
Exterior: Located at the southern end of Platform 2, this is a small square face brick building with a gabled corrugated steel roof, and a single door facing the platform, with a sandstone reveal around the fanlight. The fanlight is covered over. The roof ridge is parallel with the long axis of the platform.

PEDESTRIAN STAIRS (modern)
A set of modern concrete stairs accessing the south end of Platform 2 from the First Street overbridge.

PLATFORMS (1915)
Two perimeter platforms with modern concrete platform edges (platforms extended out).

LANDSCAPE/NATURAL FEATURES
Scarborough Railway Station is located in a bushland setting with views of the Illawarra escarpment to the west.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Platform 1 Building (1915): moderate. Some cracking evident to northern end of building.
Platform 2 Building (1915): good
Out of room (1915): very good
Date condition updated:08 May 13
Modifications and dates: 1915: Line duplicated
1986: Line electrified
Further information: Adjacent to the site is the former Station Master's residence. The building is of low integrity having been highly altered and there are many better examples of this type of building along the Illawarra line.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: Scarborough was originally known as South Clifton. A hotel named the Scarborough Hotel opened in the area in 1887. Scarborough may be named after the seaside resort in Yorkshire, England; or after one of the convict transport vessels in the First Fleet. The name Scarborough means "Fort on the Rock". The first subdivision of the area took place c. 1886-1887 and was advertised as "1st subdivision Town of Clifton, on Illawarra Line, 36 miles from Sydney". By the early 20th century, the Scarborough area, like Austinmer and Thirroul, had developed a reputation as a tourist resort.

The railway station first opened in 1887 as Clifton, on a site south of the present station, changed its name to South Clifton in 1888, then to Scarborough in 1903. When the station originally opened in 1887 it was the northern terminus on the isolated part of the Illawarra line which at that time extended to Wollongong. With duplication of the line, new sites were found and both Clifton and Scarborough were relocated with the new Scarborough railway station site opening on 21.1.1916. The original 1887 timber platform building at Scarborough was relocated to Thirroul in 1915.

The platform buildings constructed at Scarborough in 1915 were standard brick station buildings which form a matching pair opposite each other and on the ‘Down’ platform there is a detached brick Out-of-room from the same date.

The site originally had an overhead booking office and a signal box which have since been removed. The brick walled remains of an old carriage dock and a brick 1915 freight bank and remains of brick steps were noted on site previously but no longer appear to be extant.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements (none)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Scarborough Railway Station, relocated in 1915 to its current location, is of historical significance for its role as a transport hub and its association with the development of the village of Scarborough as a tourist resort, as well as demonstrating the duplication of the Illawarra line in 1915.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Scarborough Railway Station is of aesthetic significance as an intact group of railway structures dating from the 1915 duplication of the Illawarra line, which are representative standard platform buildings of this period.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place, and can provide a connection to the local community's past.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Scarborough Railway Station is not rare (one of 12 stations on the Illawarra line with brickstandard island platform buildings).
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The 1915 platform buildings and out-of-room at Scarborough Railway Station are good representative examples of railway station buildings of this period, built to standard designs. Scarborough Railway Station is a fine representative railway station with early standard brick island platform buildings. There are 12 stations on the Illawarra line with examples of this type of platform building (other examples at Banksia, Bulli, Carlton, Coledale, Erskineville, Helensburgh, Kiama, Mortdale, Rockdale, Sydenham and Wollongong). The platform building at Scarborough is virtually identical to the platform building at Helensburgh, though the building at Helensburgh is unique in being curved.
Integrity/Intactness: The platform buildings and out-of-room are intact externally. The platforms have been widened.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0124102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5012214


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