Stanmore Railway Station Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Stanmore Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Stanmore Railway Station Group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -33.8943950673 Long: 151.1641407070
Primary address: Great Southern and Western Railway, Stanmore, NSW 2048
Local govt. area: Marrickville
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan

Boundary:

North: Property boundary along Douglas Street and Gordon Cresent (including the former Parcels & Booking Office) South: Property boundary along Trafalgar Street East: 5 metres from end of platform West: 5 metres from end of platform
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Great Southern and Western RailwayStanmoreMarrickville  Primary Address
Trafalgar StreetStanmoreMarrickville  Alternate Address
Douglas StreetStanmoreMarrickville  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government 

Statement of significance:

Stanmore Railway Station has State significance for its group of largely intact, original structures dating from the 1880s establishment of the station through to the 1891 quadruplication and the 1927 sextuplication of the line, which are able to demonstrate the growth and expansion of the railways in the late 19th and early 20th century. It is significant for its collection of railway structures namely the 1880s platform buildings, the 1910s former parcels & booking office and the 1920s subway which have remained largely intact and form a cohesive group which is able to effectively represent suburban railway stations of the late 19th century. The extant 1880s platform buildings are excellent examples of ‘second class station’ buildings which have a high level of integrity. The group remains relatively intact and is a significant landmark in the local area.
Date significance updated: 09 Nov 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Builder/Maker: NSW Government Railways
Physical description: BUILDINGS
Platform Building, Platform 1/2- (Type 3) (1886)
Platform Building, Platform 3- (Type 3) (1886)
Former Parcels & Booking Office, (1913)

STRUCTURES
Platforms:
- Platform 1/2, (c.1880s, 1891) - Platform 3, (c.1880s)
Pedestrian Subway, (1926)

CONTEXT
Stanmore Railway Station is entered from Trafalgar Street to the south and Douglas Street to the north via the pedestrian subway. The buildings are located at an important road intersection, with shopping precincts to both the north and south. The station group comprises of a wayside platform with building, island platform with building, pedestrian subway, and parcel’s office to the north. The current Inner West line uses the two southern most tracks of the six tracks passing through the station.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 1-2)
External: The ‘second class station’ building is flanked by attached wing structures with a combination of hipped and gable roof forms. The awnings are integrated with the hipped roof to the east and west wings, and extend from below the line of the eaves to the central section of the roof. The roofing material for both the awning and the roof is corrugated steel which has replaced the original corrugated galvanised iron roofing. There are transverse gables, which face north and south, and feature decorative barge boards, finials and ridges. The hipped roofs to east and west have original chimneys and ventilated lanterns. The brickwork is painted and features a decorative dentilled course to the eastern and western ends. There are brick pilasters, with moulded rendered capitals, to the central section on the south side and in one instance the capital has been modified to accommodate a down pipe. The window openings to the western end of the building have been amended to suit the toilet facilities this section of the building now accommodates. Where this section of the building joins the waiting room there is cracking at the junction of the brickwork externally.

Air-conditioning units and modern services and conduits have been fixed to the brickwork and in front of windows on the northern elevation of this building. The awning structure consists of timber beams with stop chamfers, and purlins with beaded edge detail, supported by original cast iron columns (which have NSWGR insignia) with new corrugated metal roof sheeting.

Internal: The Station Manager’s office and the booking office (at the eastern end of the building) have some original extant fabric, including pressed metal ceilings and cornices, ceiling rose, original windows and architraves (with modern security grilles). New partition walls have been constructed to create a toilet and CCTV equipment room. The store room adjacent to the Station Manager’s office has (possibly original) floorboards and timber ceiling lining. The main waiting room has timber lining boards to the ceiling with a beaded profile and original mouldings. The timber floors and fixed bench seating remain and are in good condition. There is a pair of double leaf panelled doors and original windows, with timber architrave and sill boards, all in sound condition. The timber floors and fixed bench seating are also in good condition. There is a chimney breast and hearth to the western end of the room, with the opening bricked up. The waiting room, adjacent to the ladies toilet, has an original ceiling rose, door, windows and architraves and has a dado rail and skirting which is in keeping with the age of the building. There is a chimney breast and hearth to the eastern end of the room, with the opening bricked up.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 3)
External: The ‘second class station’ is a brick building with a central open waiting room and enclosed rooms to either end (painted to all but Trafalgar Rd elevation). The building has a hipped roof form with original chimneys to either end. The awning extends from below the line of the eaves and the roofing material for both the awning and the roof is corrugated steel, which has replaced the original corrugated galvanised iron roofing. The awning is to the same detail as the one on Platform 1-2, supported by original cast iron columns, new corrugated metal roof sheeting, modern services and conduits are fixed to original elements. The brick wall to Trafalgar Road has been extended to both the east, to full height adjacent to the former ticket window, and to the west to provide toilet facilities. The toilet addition (c.1900) to the far west of the building is accessed through an opening in an original external wall.

Internal: The former booking office (now storage) to the eastern end of building, has some original features including ceiling rose, original windows and architraves (the ticket window has been painted out to inside). There is a chimney breast but no fireplace opening. The waiting area to the central section has timber lining boards to the ceiling, with a beaded profile and a scotia moulding. The original timber floors and fixed bench seating are in good condition. The storage to the western end has some original features including ceiling rose, original windows and mouldings including dado rail, skirtings, architraves and sill boards and chimney breast but no fireplace opening.

FORMER PARCELS & BOOKING OFFICE
External: The Federation period brick building consists of two rooms which are currently used as storage. The external brickwork is in good condition, with new vents installed at low level. The original windows remain with the original coloured glazing (obscured to the exterior by security grilles). There is some damage to gutter fascia to the north-west corner. Externally, modern services and conduits have been fixed to the original fabric. There is a fibre cement slate half-gabled roof in a diamond pattern to north, east and west roof face with dormer details, with corrugated metal roofing to the south. The rainwater fixtures have been replaced.

Internal: The original door, windows and architraves remain with dado rail, skirting and wall vents which are in keeping with the age of the building. There is mini-corrugated metal sheeting to ceiling. Modern lighting, services and conduits have been face fixed to walls and ceilings. The timber glazed partition seems to be a later addition.

PLATFORMS
Platform 1 and Platform 2 (Up) form an island platform. Platform 1 is not currently in use except by trains during track work or in emergencies. Platform 3 (Down) is a wayside platform. All the platforms have asphalt surfaces and original brick faces.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY
The subway is face brick, with recessed detail to stairs, and a painted render finish to subway. There are areas of replacement brickwork and repairs to pointing are visible. The covered stair to Platform 1-2 is a painted timber framed structure with lining boards over rafters, which is in good condition. There are security grilles covering the openings to the outside. The timber elements are all fairly plain except at the entrance to the platform where there are stop chamfered posts and mouldings to rafters. There is modern lighting and service conduits and pipes face fixed to the walls. The concrete stairs are relatively new.

MOVEABLE ITEMS
Safe in Station Manager’s Office
Desk/Shelving Unit in Station Manager’s Office
Bench seating to waiting Rooms

ARCHAEOLOGICAL POTENTIAL
Based on the surviving documentation and the evidence on site it is unlikely there would be any potential archaeological remains at Stanmore Railway Station.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 1-2)
The building is in a good condition. A few surface cracks have developed in the brickwork.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 3)
The building is in a moderate condition.

FORMER PARCELS & BOOKING OFFICE
The building is in a good condition.

PLATFORMS
The platforms are in good condition.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY
The subway is in a moderate condition.
Modifications and dates: 1881: Block signal box erected.
1885: New signal box from Petersham re-erected; original pedestrian subway built.
1891: Platforms extended to 156 m and an additional platform built on the northern side of the new Up Suburban track.
1897: Barriers and booking office provided.
1900: Ladies toilet on Down Local platform.
1905: Island platforms extended.
1913: Signal box closed; Down platform extended.
1923: Stairways covered.
1926: New pedestrian subway built in association with widening to six tracks; Up Suburban platform demolished due to track amplification.
1928: Local and Suburban lines electrified to Homebush.
c.1944-46 Modifications to former booking/parcel office (subject to confirmation)
1955: Main lines electrified to Homebush.
1960: Up booking office relocated to Platforms 1 and 2; parcels office located in former booking office.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Nil

History

Historical notes: The Main Western line to Parramatta Junction (Granville) was originally completed in 1855. The line opened on 26 September 1855 and was double track from Sydney to Newtown and then single track to Parramatta Junction (but duplicated in 1856). The line was built as a direct connection to Parramatta Junction and, subsequently, for the purpose of connecting Sydney with the major rural railways that were constructed across the Blue Mountains to Bathurst and across the Southern Highlands to Goulburn via Liverpool. There were few stops along the line between Sydney and Parramatta Junction and it was not the original intention of the line to serve suburban development. Changes to the line were more often related to the line’s long distance purpose than to the communities along it.

Traffic to the west and south (and later north) of the state brought the need to amplify the line, first in 1891 when it was quadrupled and later in 1927 when it was sextupled (to Homebush) and electrified. With both of these major changes the earlier stations were usually entirely demolished and replaced with a new station. The 1927 work completed this process with the complete replacement of Strathfield and much of Newtown Stations. During this time suburban development also extended west along the line and these new stations were thus specifically designed as full-scale suburban passenger stations rather than rural ‘halts’. The Engineer for Existing Lines, George Cowdery (appointed 1863), was a particularly strong influence on the architecture of this line, building particularly elegant stations in the late 1880s ahead of the 1891 quadruplication, in addition to replacing the original stone arch viaduct at Lewisham with iron truss bridges. Sextuplication in 1927 brought less change to most local stations (which were on the southern side), the new tracks being express ones on the northern side.

Stanmore Station was opened in 1878 with a signal box erected in 1881. The present station buildings were built in 1885, and the station reopened on 17 January 1886. The existing island platform building originally fronted Douglas Street on the north side and was built to a similar design to the disused station building at Petersham. In 1885 the original pedestrian subway was built, and a new signal box (relocated from Petersham) replaced the existing signal box.

With quadruplication of the tracks 1891, its platform became an island platform and an awning was added to the original street façade. The platforms were also extended to 156 m and an additional platform built on the northern side of the new Up Suburban track. The station reflects the changes that came with track amplification, its original northern street frontage converted skilfully to an island by Cowdery, its relocated and extended subway and its parcels office on the new north frontage.

Further changes to the station included new barriers and a booking office in 1897; a ladies toilet on the Down Local platform in 1900; the island platforms extended in 1905; the signal box closed and Down platform extended in 1913; and stairways covered in 1923.

With sextuplication of the tracks, a new pedestrian subway was built in 1926 and the Up Suburban platform demolished.

In 1960 the Up booking office was relocated to Platforms 1 and 2 and the parcels office located in former booking office.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Railway Station-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Stanmore Railway Station has State significance as the station with its group of largely intact, original structures dating from the 1880s establishment of the station through to the 1891 quadruplication and the 1927 sextuplication of the line, is able to demonstrate the growth and expansion of the railways in the late 19th and early 20th century. The 1880s platform buildings, the 1910s former parcels & booking office and the 1920s subway collectively represent key historic phases of suburban railway development.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Stanmore Railway Station is significant for its association with Engineer-in-Chief George Cowdery who was influential in guiding the changes made to the station as part of the 1891 quadruplication of the line namely the conversion of the existing island Platform 1-2 and the construction of the former parcels and booking office along Douglas Street.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Collectively the complex of station structures at Stanmore Railway Station have local aesthetic significance. The 1880s ‘second class station buildings’ displays large central brick buildings flanked by attached wing structures, hipped roofs with a transverse gable and awnings supported by original cast iron columns with decorative brackets. The former parcels & booking office is an example of the Federation style architecture prevalent in late 19th and early 20th century suburban railway stations. Together the platform buildings along Trafalgar Street and the subway and former parcels & booking office along Douglas Street form significant landmarks in the local area.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has the potential to contribute to the local community's sense of place and can provide a connection to the local community's history.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The platform buildings at Stanmore Railway Station are largely intact externally and retain a large amouny of original fabric externally and internally and are therefore amongst the best examples of this type of platform building. The subway has been changed but it retains characteristic features of a subway namely connecting the street to the platforms and has some original fabric and is therefore a good representation.
Integrity/Intactness: The integrity of Stanmore Railway Station as a whole is considered to be high based on the fact that platform buildings, the subway, and the parcels office are rarely seen so intact on the one site.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 1-2)
The building is largely intact externally although its interiors have been modified to meet ever-changing operational requirements. It retains a number of original external features namely the chimneys, ventilated lanterns, and decorative dentilled course to the brickwork and original cast iron columns with NSWGR insignia. Some of the original elements retained to the interior include pressed metal ceilings, cornices, ceiling rose, original windows, architraves, floorboards, timber ceiling lining, fixed bench seating, a pair of double leaf panelled doors and original but bricked up chimney breasts. Modern services such as air-conditioning, lighting and CCTV have been installed yet they do not detract from the integrity of the buildings overall.

PLATFORM BUILDING (Platform 3)
The building is largely intact externally although its interiors have been modified to meet ever-changing operational requirements. It retains a number of original external features namely the chimneys and original cast iron columns with NSWGR insignia. Some of the original elements retained to the interior include a ceiling rose, original windows, architraves, floorboards, timber ceiling lining, fixed bench seating and an original but bricked up chimney breast. Modern services such as air-conditioning, lighting and CCTV have been installed yet they do not detract from the integrity of the buildings overall.

FORMER PARCELS & BOOKING OFFICE
Generally the building is in good condition with original fabric both internally and externally. Unsympathetic repairs, to the roof in particular, graffiti and adhesive marks on the brickwork do somewhat reduce the integrity of this buildingbut can be remedied.

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAY
The subway has been changed but it also retains original fabric namely the brick walls, the steel girder and concrete ceiling.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0125102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

None

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5012223


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