Tahmoor Railway Station Group | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Tahmoor Railway Station Group

Item details

Name of item: Tahmoor Railway Station Group
Other name/s: 'great south road' ; Lupton's Inn ;
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -34.2234871832 Long: 150.5900165090
Primary address: Main Southern railway, Tahmoor, NSW 2573
Local govt. area: Wollondilly
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
RAILWAY LAND    

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by Pitt Steet to the west, the road bridge to the north, the property boundary to the east and a line approximately 30 metres to the south of the platforms crossing the tracks connecting the side boundaries
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Main Southern railwayTahmoorWollondilly  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government16 Nov 98

Statement of significance:

Tahmoor Railway Station is of state significance for its key role in the development of the local area and the establishment of the town of Tahmoor. The site is significant for its ability to demonstrate the impact of the railways on shaping inland settlements following the deviation of the Great Southern line from Picton to Mittagong in 1919. The small timber station building is a rare example of the standard A2 station building issued in the early 20th century and constructed at small wayside country locations throughout NSW. The small timber lamp room and toilet structure are also rare and compliment the setting of the small station group.
Date significance updated: 09 Nov 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1919-
Physical description: Station Building - type 11, platform 2 (1919)
Platforms 1 and 2 - brick (1919) and extended with open elevated concrete slabs
Lamp Room - timber, Platform 1 (c.1920s)
Toilet Structure - brick, corrugated iron curved roof, Platform 1 (1919, c.1989)
Shelter (1989)

STATION BUILDING (1919)
The Station Building is a standard 'A2' (type 11) building and is a simple two room building with a waiting room and ticket office. The building is clad in weatherboard and has a gabled roof clad in corrugated iron which extends as a continuous awning over the platform. The awning is supported on steel brackets and features timber valance detail to the awning ends, which is the only decorative detailing.

The original platforms are face brick but have been extended most likely in c.1989 with elevated concrete slabs.

LAMP ROOM (c.1920s)
A small single room weatherboard building with skillion roof sloping towards platform clad in corrugated iron with simple timber supports for a short extended awning.

TOILET STRUCTURE - (1919, c.1989)
A small single room brick building with corrugated iron curved roof.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Generally in good condition.
Modifications and dates: 1919 Goods siding laid in.
1941 Goods siding reduced in length.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Aboriginal land

History

Historical notes: Tahmoor Railway Precinct is located on the Main South line. The 'Great Southern Railway' originally opened from Picton to Mittagong via a loop line in 1867. In 1919, the Main South line from Picton was deviated to Mittagong to ease the grades. The new line virtually follows the line of the Great South Road taking the main line away from Thirlmere, Buxton, Balmoral and Hilltop and passing through Tahmoor, Bargo and Yerrinbool.

The construction of the new deviation caused concern for the towns along the existing line anxious the deviation would have a detrimental effect on property and development: "Samuel Emmett who held 4000 acres of land near Hilltop could no longer hope to make any profit from it. Not to be thwarted, Sam purchased hundreds of acres of land near where it was proposed to build a new railway platform along the Bargo road (and) subdivided the land into some 600 building blocks which now forms the nucleus of the township of Tahmoor...The deviation works brought hundreds of men and their families to the area creating an urgent need for postal facilities and shops. Sam Emmett was again ahead of the rest, applying for the re establishment of a post office which he proposed to be in premises attached to a shop which he was in the process of building...The application for a post office was approved, however the identity of the location was still in question...Sam's preference of 'Bronzewing Park'The Railway Department advised that the new platform would be called 'Tahmoor', Aboriginal for bronzewing pigeon...In order to expedite the matter, the Postal Department took the side of the Railway Department and directed that the new Post Office be called 'Tahmoor'. Tahmoor Post Office commenced operations on 1 September 1916 with Sam as Postmaster" (Fairfax, 2009).

Tahmoor Station opened with the completion of the double track deviation between Picton and Mittagong which opened on 13 July 1919. The station was constructed with two side platforms with a small timber station building on the Down Platform (Platform 2). The building is a standard A2 building which was part of a standard set of designs introduced from the 1900s and reissued again in 1913. Most examples date from 1910/20s. The smaller A1 - A4 structures were wayside buildings predominantly constructed of timber weatherboard in country locations with a gabled roof and continuous awning.

The station also featured an A1 standard sitting room and WC on the Up Platform (Platform 1). A lamp room was also constructed on the Up Platform after 1919 and later converted to a WC.

The waiting room on the Up Platform was destroyed by fire in 1979. In 1989 a standard open shelter was built on the Up platform which protects a ticket vending machine. The original 1919 WC has also been altered, probably also in 1989.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Rail transport-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Railway Station-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Railways to inland settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Public Transport - suburban railway lines-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Railway work culture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and administering rail networks-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Tahmoor Railway Station is of significance for its key role in the development of the local area and the establishment of the town of Tahmoor. The site is significant for its ability to demonstrate the impact of the railways on shaping inland settlements following the deviation of the Great Southern line from Picton to Mittagong in 1919.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The small timber station building is a good example of the standard A2 station building issued in the early 20th Century and constructed at small wayside country locations throughout NSW. The small timber lamp room compliments the setting of the small station group.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The site is of social significance to the local community on account of its lengthy association for providing an important source of employment, trade and social interaction for the local area. The site is significant for its ability to contribute to the local community’s sense of place, is a distinctive feature of the daily life of many community members, and provides a connection to the local community’s past.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The small station building and lamp room are rare examples of extant timber railway buildings in NSW, as many examples have been replaced by modern structures. The toilet structure is also a rare, albeit altered, surviving example of a standard structure, with only very few remaining in NSW.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The site has representative significance for its collection of railway structures including the station building, lamp room and toilet structure that collectively demonstrate widespread early 20th Century railway customs, activities and design in NSW, and are representative of similar items that are found in other railway sites across the state.
Integrity/Intactness: The extant station buildings have a high level of integrity. The group has however been diminished by the removal of the second waiting room building following a fire in c.1979.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0125802 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenRapp port Heritage Consultants2006'Centennial Tahmoor Colliery Heritage Impact Assessment for Long walls 24-26' (March 2006)

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5012233
File number: H06/00251/


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