Bradman Oval and Collection of Cricket Memorabilia | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Bradman Oval and Collection of Cricket Memorabilia

Item details

Name of item: Bradman Oval and Collection of Cricket Memorabilia
Other name/s: Glebe Park
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Recreation and Entertainment
Category: Cricket Pitch/ Ground
Location: Lat: -34.4827404575 Long: 150.4249075310
Primary address: Glebe Street, Bowral, NSW 2576
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP1153049
LOT2 DP1153049
LOT3 DP1153049
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Glebe StreetBowralWingecarribee  Primary Address
Bowral StreetBowralWingecarribee  Alternate Address
Boolwey StreetBowralWingecarribee  Alternate Address
St Jude StreetBowralWingecarribee  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Wingecarribee Shire CouncilLocal Government 

Statement of significance:

Bradman Oval is historically significant at a State level through its association with Sir Donald Bradman's cricketing activities, an association which has been reinforced by the recent construction of the Bradman Museum and the name change to Bradman Oval to commemorate national cricketing history. Bradman Oval provides a tangible link to Sir Donald Bradman's formative years. As the former Glebe Park, the Bradman Oval represents the country town parks of the turn of the century which were characterised by a simple planting layout of trees and a few shrubs and reflects a phase in the development of Bowral when attention was turning to the garden environment. Aesthetically, the park's simple layout is further enhanced by the combination of mature Eucalyptus and deciduous trees which enhance the surroundings.
Date significance updated: 06 Aug 15
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1893-
Physical description: Bradman Oval is bounded by Glebe Street, Boolwey Street, St Jude Street and Bowral Street. A large parkland area dominated by a stand of mature eucalypts possibly remnants of the original vegetation. A stand of these on the eastern corner impart a sense of enclosure and offer a gateway to the corner site. A line of maturing quercus occupy the St Jude's Rd boundary, and a line of exotic trees are being established between the eucalypts and Bradman Oval. The park contains a childrens playground with old road roller and adventure playground on the eastern side and is the location of the newly constructed (1989) Bradman Pavilion as a museum of Australian cricketing history.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good.
Date condition updated:31 May 00
Current use: Cricket Oval
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, town lot, church glebe, common

History

Historical notes: The land on which Bradman Oval is situated was originally part of Glebe Park granted to the Church of England by Oxley.

In 1883 the Bowral Cricket Club was formed and cricket has been played on the ground since 1893.

George and Emily Bradman moved from a farm near Cootamundra to the adjacent (1890) house at 52 Shepherd Street, Bowral, in 1911. Young Don Bradman, future cricketer, lived here during his formative years, from age three to fifteen. The Bradmans had five children: Victor, Lilian, Islet, Elizabeth May and Donald, their youngest. Don was taught piano in this house, started school at Bowral Public School in 1913, and was later described by his headmaster as especially good at mathematics and French. He later became a gifted pianist, businessman and man of letters. At 12, Bradman scored his firts century while living here. Every afternoon after school, Don would arrive home, run through the door, throw his satchel down in the hall and head out to the tank stand to play with his golf ball and stump. It was here as a 12-year-old he met Jessie Menzies, who would later become his wife of 65 years. Against the tank stand Don honed his reflexes with a golf ball, skills that saw him become the greatest batsman in Australia, with an average of 99.94 (52 Shepherd Street.com, 2017).

Bradman first played on this oval when he was 12 and scored 29 not out for the Bowral Cricket Club.

Bradman became a member of the Bowral Cricket Club in 1925. During his first season in the Berrima District competition, Bradman scored 1,318 runs, an average of 94.14 runs. He also took 51 wickets, averaging 7.8 and held 26 catches.

Another memorable game on this ground was in 1925 when Bradman scored 234 against the Wingello team that included Bill O'Reilly.

In 1947 the 'A Glebe' wicket was formally named the Bradman Oval. Later, improvements were made to the oval through the efforts of Bowral Municipal Council and Gordon Whatman of Bowral, personally maintained the wicket area.

In 1976 the reopening of a rehabilitated Bradman Oval was performed by Sir Donald Bradman himself in the company of the great Australian bowler Bill O'Reilly.

Overlooking the oval is the Pavilion which opened in 1989. It houses the Player's Club Room, change rooms and meeting room. Adjacent to the Pavilion is the Museum, often referred to as the Second Innings, which opened on 27 August 1996 (Sir Donald's 88th Birthday).

The first reported cricket match played in Australia was in Sydney on 8 January 1804 at the park now known as Hyde Park. By the 1830s inter-club competition had commenced in Sydney and due to the discovery of gold in the 1850s, cricket spread rapidly to the other colonies of Australia. On 15 March 1877 the first recognised Test match was played between an Australian XI and England at the Melbourne Cricket ground. Between 1880 to 1914, England and Australia played a staggering 91 Test matches during the period. Cricket in the first half of the 20th century was dominated with high scores from batsman such as Ponsford and Bradman. It was a time of record crowds as spectator flocked to the grounds to see test cricket against England, South Africa and the West Indies. Women's cricket also came of age with the first test series against England in 1934. After World War II international cricket was consolidated with Tests against New Zealand, India and Pakistan. The 1970s saw the balance change with pace bowlers dominating the game. Cricket faced its biggest division in 1977 with the advent of World Series Cricket. For two years the Australian Cricket Board banned the World Series players from recognised international fixtures resulting in parallel matches. By 1979 the rift was healed which saw the development of night games and greater television coverage. Today cricket remains Australia's major summer sport and through the International Cricket Council continues to develop worldwide. (Bradman Museum, A Museum of Australian Cricketing history Commemorating Sir Donald Bradman A.C.)

Sir Donald Bradman is Australia's greatest cricketer and one of Australia's greatest sporting heroes. He averaged 99.94 runs per Test innings and made 29 Test centuries. In 1930 he scored 309 not out in a single day in a Test in England. His invincible side of 1948 beat a good English side four nil. He scored a century, on average, about every third innings. Sir Donald Bradman was the first absolute world-beater that Australia produced and the first man from this country to engage in an activity common to many countries and rise a clear class above anyone else in the world. His cricketing career and has had a remarkable influence on Australia and the cricketing world. (The Australian, 1989).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Parks-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Park reserve-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places How are significant places marked in the landscape by, or for, different groups-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of sport and recreation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Commons-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Parks and public gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Common-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Enjoying public parks and gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Anglican Community-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Sport-Activities associated with organised recreational and health promotional activities cricket-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Oxley, Surveyor General-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Don Bradman, cricketer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Bowral Cricket Club-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Bradman Oval is historically significant at a State level through its association with Sir Donald Bradman's cricketing activities, an association which has been reinforced by the recent construction of the Bradman Museum and the name change to Bradman Oval to commemorate national cricketing history. As the former Glebe Park, the Bradman Oval represents the country town parks of the turn of the century which were characterised by a simple planting layout of trees and a few shrubs and reflects a phase in the development of Bowral when attention was turning to the garden environment.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Aesthetically, the park's simple layout is further enhanced by the combination of mature Eucalyptus and deciduous trees which enhance the surroundings.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Socially, Bradman Oval is held in high esteem by the NSW community as a place associated with the cricketing career of Sir Donald Bradman.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0139923 Jun 00 735230

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Tourism 2007Bradman Oval and Collection of Cricket Memorabilia View detail
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Bradman Oval and Collection of Cricket Memorabilia View detail
WrittenBradman Foundation Bradman Museum - A Museum of Australian Cricketing History - Commemorating Sir Donald Bradman A.C
WrittenHyland, A & Mulvaney R (editors)1996Boundary - Souveneir Edition - The Journal of the Friends of the Bradman Museum
Writtenunattributed (52ShepherdStreet.com)2017'Step inside 52 Shepherd Street' View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5014211
File number: EF14/5819; H00/00082/1


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