Tranby | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Tranby

Item details

Name of item: Tranby
Other name/s: Toxteth Cottage
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Aboriginal
Category: Adult Education
Location: Lat: -33.8776945365 Long: 151.1829936330
Primary address: 13 Mansfield Street, Glebe, NSW 2037
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP85944
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
13 Mansfield StreetGlebeSydneyPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address
13 Mansfield St (Cnr Boyce St)GlebeSydneyPetershamCumberlandAlternate Address
Boyce StreetGlebeSydneyPetershamCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Co-operative for Aborigines LtdCommunity Group06 Apr 99

Statement of significance:

Tranby and its history can be viewed as reflecting the evolutionary changes which took place on the Glebe Peninsula in architecture, land allocation and the growth and diversity of society. It is a fine example of a post-Regency picturesque cottage and one of the earliest buildings in Glebe to have an asymmetrical plan. The property is the focus for the Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative, the first and only independant, Aboriginal controlled adult eduacation centre in Australia. It has been the scene of a number of key issues in the history of indigenous activism. Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative has contributed significantly to policy development and other initiatives facing Aboriginal peoples, presently and over the last 36 years. It has become a landmark for Australia's Aboriginal people and the world's indigenous peoples.
Date significance updated: 01 Oct 97
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: AL & G McCredie
Construction years: 1858-1858
Physical description: Garden:
Tranby's cottage is located close to the street, with a small front garden and large rear garden.
The rear garden has been in-filled in the 1990s with a modern wing for the college's use, and adapted as a courtyard, with plantings, paving, ramps and bridges to allow easy access to both stories of the new wing (with library below)(Stuart Read, 23/4/2019).

Tranby Cottage:
It is a fine example of a post-Regency picturesque cottage and may possibly have been designed with the style of Toxteth Park in mind. It is feasible that (architect) George Allen Mansfield designed the northern extension to the cottage of Tranby in the 1870s-80s (ibid, 2000, 31). A slate-roofed six-room stone cottage in Georgian style (Collingwood et al, 2019).

A post-Regency style cottage (now) of 15 rooms, designed on an asymmetrical plan. It retains the low lines and broad proportions of early colonial dwellings. The front elevation describes three stages of building. The original section, containing six rooms, is central to the facade describing a Georgian character recessed into the whole. A central door opening and French doors either side open to a verandah which is supported by cast iron columns. The front verandah is flanked on either side by later editions. The later edition of a smaller parapet-fronted wing adds an Italianate flavour to the whole. The whole is covered with a slate hipped roof with metal ridge capping and box gutters. Wall fabric varies from cement rendered brick ashlar, to sandstone lime rendered ashlar coursing.

Bernard and Kate Smith described Tranby as 'an interesting example of a cottage which retained the low lines and broad proportions of early colonial dwellings' (Lonergan & Kenny, 2000, 31).

New Classrooms & Library (c.1994-5):
Located in the rear garden. The design reflects the cultural values of the college. The circular rooms reflect a philosophy of equality in communication and the masonry walls provide a solid appearance that reinforces the adjoining 19th century architecture. Circular copper roofs with protruding vents provide contemporary finials to a massed turreted form. The architectural plans caused a huge amount of opposition when submitted to Leichhardt Council. The proposal involved the demolition of a rear portion of Tranby (cottage) and a rear section of the adjacent Minnamurra (c1883). Cracknell and Lonergan (architects) worked proactively with all parties to modify the design in amenity terms and argue the philosophy of design in an intelligent and convincing manner (ibid, 2000, 32).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Generally sound structural condition.

2019: Tranby needs serious structural improvements to our heritage roof and urgent Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) updates. Recent storms and strong winds have exacerbated our 118-year-old roof's previous damage and the buildings safety concerns are now our top priority. The leaking roof has had serious and costly consequences like electrical work, dampness, and floor and wall damage to our heritage building. To prevent ongoing roof deterioration and further building insecurity, urgent restorative roof work must be undertaken (Grant application, 3/2019).
Modifications and dates: 1880s - northern wing addition
1910 - eastern wing addition

1958+ college use of site
1994-5 - new rear addition in contemporary style
Current use: Aboriginal-run community-based adult education centre
Former use: Aboriginal land, Church land, Estate cottage, Residence

History

Historical notes: The Glebe area is the home of the Cadigal ancestors. It was densely covered by eucalypts and abundant with bird and animal life. Figs, lily pillies, yams and burrawang nuts grew in the bush and there were abundant fish and rock oysters from Blackwattle Bay. Along the Balmain peninsular, Cadigal people met their Wangal neighbours who shared the Dharug language with coastal and inland communities around Sydney - Eora country (Lonergan & Kenny, 2000, 31).

The Leichhardt area was originally inhabited by the Wangal clan of Aborigines. After 1788 diseases such as smallpox and the loss of their hunting grounds caused huge reductions in their numbers and they moved further inland. Since European settlement the foreshores of Blackwattle Bay and Rozelle Bay have developed a unique maritime, industrial and residential character - a character which continues to evolve as areas which were originally residential estates, then industrial areas, are redeveloped for residential units and parklands (City Plan Heritage, 2005, quoting Max Solling & Peter Reynolds 'Leichhardt: On the Margins of the City', 1997, 14).

The first formal grant in the Glebe area was a 400 acre grant to Rev. Richard Johnson, the colony's first chaplain, in 1789 (for the support of a clergyman and a schoolmaster for the settlement). Johnson renounced the land due to the lack of convict labour (Lonergan & Kenny, 2000, 31).

The Glebe (a portion of land allocated for the maintenance of a minister) comprised rolling shale hills covering sandstone, with several sandstone cliff faces. The ridges were drained by several creeks including Blackwattle Creek, Orphan School Creek and Johnston Creek. Extensive swampland surrounded the creeks. On the shale ridges, heavily timbered woodlands contained several varieties of eucalypts while the swamplands and tidal mudflats had mangroves, swamp oaks (Casuarina glauca) and blackwattles (Callicoma serratifolia) after which the bay is named. Blackwattle Swamp was first mentioned by surveyors in the 1790s and Blackwattle Swamp Bay in 1807. By 1840 it was called Blackwattle Bay. Boat parties collected wattles and reeds for the building of huts, and kangaroos and emus were hunted by the early settlers who called the area the Kangaroo Ground. Rozelle Bay is thought to have been named after a schooner which once moored in its waters (ibid, 2005).

Rev. Johnson's land remained largely undeveloped until 1828, when the Church and School Corporation subdivided it into 28 lots, 3 of which they retained for church use (ibid, 2005).

The Anglican Church sold 27 allotments in 1828 - north on the point and south around Broadway. The Church kept the middle section where the Glebe Estate is now. On the point the sea breezes attracted the wealthy who built villas. The Broadway end attracted slaughterhouses and boiling down works that used the creek draining to Blackwattle Swamp.

Up until the 1970s the Glebe Estate was in the possession of the Anglican Church.

On the point the sea breezes attracted the wealthy who built villas. The Broadway end attracted slaughterhouses and boiling down works that used the creek draining to Blackwattle Swamp. Smaller working-class houses were built around these industries. Abbattoirs were built there from the 1860s.

When Glebe was made a municipality in 1859 there were pro and anti-municipal clashes in the streets. From 1850 Glebe was dominated by wealthier interests.

Reclaiming the swamp, Wentworth Park opened in 1882 as a cricket ground and lawn bowls club. Rugby Union was played there in the late 19th century. The dog racing started in 1932. In the early 20th century modest villas were broken up into boarding houses as they were elsewhere in the inner city areas. The wealthier moved into the suburbs which were opening up through the railways. Up until the 1950s Sydney was the location for working class employment - it was a port and industrial city. By the 1960s central Sydney was becoming a corporate city with service-based industries - capital intensive not labour intensive. A shift in demographics occurred, with younger professionals and technical and administrative people servicing the corporate city wanting to live close by. Housing was coming under threat and the heritage conservation movement was starting. The Fish Markets moved in in the 1970s. A influx of students came to Glebe in the 1960s and 1970s (Dr Lisa Murray, in Central Sydney, 5/8/2009).

Toxteth Cottage, later Tranby:
'Toxteth Cottage', was the first house built in the grounds of solicitor Georger Allen's 'Toxteth Park' Estate, after Toxteth House. Its construction date may be as early as 1840. Allen, the first solicitor trained in the colony, bought 95 acres (a section of the former grant to the Anglican church for Glebe lands (ibid, 2000, 31) and commissioned John Verge to build 'an elegant country house' for his growing family. This was Toxteth Park (house). Within its grounds were three fresh water wells, an orchard, a Wesleyan chapel, cricket pitch and pavilion. A stone house (Toxteth Cottage, later Tranby) and ten wooden shingle-roofed cottages accommodated family members, gardeners and other workers (Collingwood et al, 2019, entries for Tranby and for Toxteth Park). It was first listed in the Sands Directory in 1858. Allen, a founding member of the legal firm Allen, Allen and Hemsley, President of the Bank of NSW 1860-66, Mayor of Sydney 1844-5 and Member of the Legislative Council 1845-73, owned the property (Cracknell and Lonergan 1994: 5-13). Toxteth Park was known for its hospitality (Collingwood et al, 2019, entries on Tranby and Toxteth Park).

It is a fine example of a post-Regency picturesque cottage and may possibly have been designed with the style of Toxteth Park in mind (ibid, 2000, 31).

By 1857 (ibid, 2019) Toxteth Cottage was the residence of George Allen's third daughter Mary Emma Lucy and her husband, architect George Allen Mansfield. Mansfield was the son of Rev. Ralph Mansfield, a Wesleyan Minister and the secretary of the Australian Gas Light Company from 1837 to 1879. He and Mary lived here until 1861 (ibid, 1994, 5-13). It was the birthplace of their children Lucy in 1859 and Harold in 1861. The boy survived but Mary Mansfield died less than a week after her birth (ibid, 2019).

The cottage became known as Tranby in the 1870s when Allen's eldest daughter Elizabeth Pitman and her husband the Wesleyan missionary and philologist, Rev. William Binnington Boyce lived there (ibid, 1994, 5-13). The couple made their home here after returning in 1877 to Sydney from London where they had lived for several years (ibid, 2019).

It is feasible that (architect) George Allen Mansfield designed the northern extension to the Toxteth (Tranby) cottage in the 1870s-80s (ibid, 2000, 31). Wing additions were made in the 1880s (ibid, 2019).

On the (1885) death of George Allen, Toxteth Park Estate (aka the Allen Estate)(Lonergan & Kenny, 2000, 31) was progressively subdivided and in 1887, Tranby was purchased by Allen's brother, William Boyce Allen. In 1910 additions were made to the house to accomodate William Allen's large family (ibid, 1994, 5-13; ibid, 2019).

In 1931 Tranby became a hostel for the University of Sydney and remained in the Boyce Allen family until 1946 (ibid, 1994, 14). It was purchased in 1946 by the Reverend John Hope of the Christ Church St Laurence and other trustees and became Hope's home (ibid, 2000, 31). Collingwood et al (2019) note that it was purchsed in 1946 by the Anglican Board of Missions (ABM).

In 1957 Tranby was pledged as a gift (ibid, 2000, 31) to Anglican bush brother Alf Clint by the Rev. John Hope. Clint was the ABM's Director of Co-operatives in Australia and Papua New Guinea. He had helped establish successful indigenous co-operatives throughout the Torres Strait, New South Wales and Queensland. In 1957 he set Tranby up to (ibid, 2019) become a Training Centre for the 'development of co-operative practices for Aborigines', under the control of the ABM's Christian Community Co-operative (ibid, 1994: 14).

1958 saw the foundation of the Tranby Co-operative for Aborigines (ibid, 2019). The college has operated on this site since (ibid, 2000, 31). The first indigenous students lived at Tranby training in skills-based work and apprenticeships. They attended co-operative management classes and gained confidence to return to their communities - with skills to organise social and economic resources (ibid, 2000, 32).

In 1971 the name 'Tranby Co-operative for Aboriginies Ltd.' was registered. Tranby is now an Aboriginal managed, commmunity based, non-profit co-operative with the college forming the largest part of the facility. It is a meeting place for senior community members and has been the scene of key issues in the history of indigenous activism, including meetings which led to the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody (ibid, 1994: 18-19).

Aboriginal representation on the Board of Directors in the 1970s included Kevin Cook, a student of Tranby who followed Alf Clint as General Secretary in 1981. Kevin listened to the needs of Aboriginal communities and guided changes (ibid, 2000, 32).

In 1979 Tranby was subject of a permanent conservation order under the Heritage Act 1977.

In the 1980s Tranby successfully lobbied for government funding and the structure of the courses changed to compensate for the failures of mainstream education. With Aboriginal studies and cooperative principles maintained, Tranby provided certificate courses in literacy and numeracy, tertiary preparation and business studies (ibid, 2000, 32).

A new circular building, in desert tones (ibid, 2019) approved in 1994 (and built in the rear garden) provides additional accommodation. The role of the College has changed over 40 years and the new building reflects a commitment to adapting to the changing needs of the Aboriginal community. The findings of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody have expressed the great need for better educational facilities and curriculum for Aboriginal leaders. The educational and cultural facility offers an Aboriginal philosophy and perspective on education and culture, which has resulted in the development of culturally-appropriate teaching methods, materials and educational programs (ibid, 2000, 31). The design of the (new) classrooms reflects the cultural values of the college. The circular rooms reflect a philosophy of equality in communication and the masonry walls provide a solid appearance that reinforces the adjoining 19th century architecture. Circular copper roofs with protruding vents provide contemporary finials to a massed turreted form. The architectural plans caused a huge amount of opposition when submitted to Leichhardt Council. The proposal involved the demolition of a rear portion of Tranby (cottage) and a rear section of the adjacent Minnamurra (c1883). Cracknell and Lonergan (architects) worked proactively with all parties to modify the design in amenity terms and argue the philosophy of design in an intelligent and convincing manner (ibid, 2000, 32).

In 1998 Jack Beetson became Executive Director and Tranby achieved national accrediation, through the NSW Vocation, Eduation and Training Board, of the college's diploma courses. With the guidance of Community Elders, Tranby has developed the Diploma in Development Studies, Aboriginal Communities and the Advanced Diploma of Applied Aboriginal Studies. The Diploma of National Indigenous Legal Studies, developed through the Human Rights Commission, addresses the legal and human rights of indigenous peoples (ibid, 2000, 32).

Tranby was listed on the NSW State Heritage Register in 1999.

The site has undergone redevelopment to accomodate the increasing demands on community and educational programmes. Tranby is now called Tranby National Indigenous Adult Education and Training, having in 2015 embarked on a rebranding mission to guarantee it continues to be responsive to the needs of community, potential students and industry and also attracts funding support from government and philanthropists (https://tranby.edu.au/about-us/).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Eora nation - places of contact with the colonisers-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. All nations - the stolen generations-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. All nations - reconciliation events-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes demonstrating styles in landscape design-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - urban villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Adult Education-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Tertiary education-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. University hostel-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. College boarding house-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Aboriginal Schools-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Regency Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Georgian revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - late 20th century postmodern-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (early)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Adaptive new use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Anglican Community-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Philanthropy for religious uses-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Conducting missions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Providing schools and education-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship religion (private education)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Gentlemen's Villas-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. George Allen MLC, 1800-77, lawyer, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with George Allen Mansfield, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rev. William Binnington Boyce, Anglican priest-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rev. Richard Johnson, the colony's first chaplain-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Mary Mansfield (nee Allen), gentlewoman-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Mary Boyce (nee Mansfield), gentlewoman-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Boyce Allen, soliticitor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rev. John Hope, Anglican priest-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Tranby and its history can be viewed as refelcting the evolutionary changes which took place on the Glebe Peninsula in architecture, land allocation and the growth and diversity of society. It was the first house built on the Toxteth Estate after Toxteth House and remained in the Allen family until the 1840s. Two of the boundary streets (Boyce and Mansfield) are named after notable inhabitants of the cottage. (Cracknell and Lonergan 1994:

The property is also the focus for the Tranby Aboriginal Co-opeative, the first and only independant, Aboriginal controlled adult eduacation centre in Australia. It has been the scene of a number of key issues in the history of Indigenous activism, including meetings which led to the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Tranby is a fine example of a post-Regency picturesque cottage and one of the earliest buildings in Glebe to have an asymmetrical plan. It has a harmonious and unspoilt stylistic unity. (Cracknell and Lonergan 1994: 87)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative has contributed significantly to policy development and other initiatives facing Aboriginal peoples, presently and over the last 36 years. It has become a landmark for fro Australia's Aboriginal people and the world's Indigenous peoples. It is a local and regional landmark for the non-Aboriginal community which has established a relationship with Tranby through eduaction in Aboriginal culture and involvement with human rights movements. It has become a symbol of the integrity of Aboriginal culture within a European social and political structure. (Cracknell and Lonergan 1994: 88-89)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementCarry out an Archaeological Assessment 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0002102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0002114 Dec 79 1786349
Local Environmental Plan  15 Jun 84   
Development Control Plan     
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCollingwood, Lyn; Crawshaw, Peter; and Hannan, Robert2019'Tranby' and 'Toxteth Park' View detail
WrittenCracknell and Lonergan1994Conservation Plan and Policy for Proposed New Educational and Cultural Facilities: Tranby Aboriginal Co-Operative College (DRAFT ONLY)
WrittenLonergan, Peter; and Kenny, Simon2000Tranby: continuity, conservation and contemporary values

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5044971
File number: S90/06211 & HC 32055


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