Civic Railway Workshops | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Civic Railway Workshops

Item details

Name of item: Civic Railway Workshops
Other name/s: Honeysuckle; Industrial Archaeological Site; Newcastle Museum
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway
Location: Lat: -32.9259277396 Long: 151.7713519130
Primary address: Great Northern Railway, Newcastle, NSW 2300
Parish: Newcastle
County: Northumberland
Local govt. area: Newcastle
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Awabakal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT511 DP1030264
PART LOT5001 DP1049339
LOT3 DP1111305
LOT4 DP1111305
LOT5 DP1111305
LOT7 DP1137661
LOT26 DP1162435
LOT27 DP1162440
LOT21 DP1165985
LOT2 DP1226145
   CP/SP71834
   CP/SP71866
   SP76276
   SP76482
   SP77086
   SP81876
   SP81877
PART LOT5 DP883474

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by Merewether Street to the east, the railway line to the south, Lee Wharf Road to the north and a line crossing the site approximately 50 metres to the west of the last building.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Great Northern RailwayNewcastleNewcastleNewcastleNorthumberlandPrimary Address
Lee Wharf RoadNewcastleNewcastle  Alternate Address
Honeysuckle DriveNewcastleNewcastle  Alternate Address
Merewether StreetNewcastleNewcastle  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Hunter Development CorporationState Government 
Newcastle City CouncilLocal Government24 Mar 17

Statement of significance:

Civic Railway Workshops is one of the outstanding industrial workshop sites in the State and an excellent example of a Victorian workshop group that display continuity, excellence in design and execution and add to the townscape of Newcastle as well as play an important role in the history of the railway in the area. The whole group is of highest significance in the State. Construction of workshops in Newcastle was brought about for two reasons: separation of the Great Northern lines from the main system from 1857 to 1889; and in recognition of the exclusive facilities and rolling stock required to handle coal traffic.

The Lee Wharf site has the potential to contain historical archaeological remains, including remains of State significance. Some may lie within the boundary of the State Heritage Register Listing. Others may lay outside that boundary. (Archaeology Significance taken from Godden Mackay Logan, May 2003)
Date significance updated: 23 Jun 04
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Whitton
Builder/Maker: Dart & Parkhill (Boiler House & Machine Shop)
Construction years: 1874-1886
Physical description: Divisional Engineer's Office - constructed in 1886 is a two-storied, rendered and painted brick building at the western end of the group. It has a corrugated-iron awning around three sides and a corrugated iron double-gabled roof with rendered brick chimneys along both ridges. Architect was John Whitton.

Boiler House and Machine Shop is directly to the east and adjoins the Divisonal Engineer's Office. Built in 1874-75 (Architect John Whitton, Builder: Dart & Parkhill) it is the oldest building in the group. A single-storey brick building with corrugated gabled roof and arched windows set within a series of recessed bays along both facades. A small brick gabled wing has been added to its northen facade.

Blacksmith's Shop and Wheel Shop - constructed between 1880 -1882, it is located on the southern side of Workshop Way. The building originally served as a locomotive blacksmith's shop (eastern end) and machine and wheel shop (western end). Brick walls and corrugated-iron roofing with a series of arched windows along the length of the northen and southern sides. Five metres in height, its double-gabled roof is connected along the centre line with a box gutter.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The Boiler House and Machine Shop has been restored and is used by the Hunter Valley Wine Society.

Blacksmith's Shop and Wheel Shop - the building has recently been restored and is currently tenanted.

The site has the potential to contain evidence of the original Monier Sea Wall, the remnants of an original stone wall associated with the reclamation for Lee Wharf construction; rail sidings along Lee Wharf and spur connections to the Honeysuckle Railway Workshops/Yards.

In terms of archaeological potential, the Honeysuckle Railway Workshops contain industrial remains including extensive footings of demolished brick buildings, underground pipes for air, water, gas, hydraulic oil and artefacts related to use and occupation of the area as a railway facility for over 100 years.

The site has the potential to contain evidence of the original Monier Sea Wall, an innovative and supposedly rat-proof system first used at Walsh Bay, Sydney and then used here. The remnants of an original stone wall associated with reclamation for the Lee Wharf construction; rail sidings along Lee Wharf and spur connections to the Honeysuckle Railway Workshops/Yards.
Date condition updated:29 Sep 04
Modifications and dates: Boiler House and Machine Shop - originally served as a locomotive blacksmith's shop (eastern end) and machine and wheel shop (western end). A small brick gabled wing has been added to its northen facade.
Current use: Shopping precinct
Former use: Railway Workshops

History

Historical notes: The site's history has been summarised according to significant events (Umwelt, August 2003):

c.1840- purchase of 38 acres at Honeysuckle Point for the erection of a Church School by the trustees on behalf of Anglican Bishop Broughton - 'The Bishop's Settlement'

1848 - the Dangar family established Newcastle's first cannery on the harbour foreshore, east of the Bishop's Settlement

1848 - 1851- Bishop's settlement subdivided into 42 lots and 40 of these were occupied by tenants. Some built houses, others commercial premises, some were operated as shipbuilding yards and industrial plants.

1853 - 1855 the Hunter River Railway Company was formed to build a line between Newcastle and Maitland. Honeysuckle Point chosen as the eastern terminus for the railway. The company was taken over by the State government due to its poor financial situation.

1856 -1895 Railway construction from Honeysuckle to Hexham. Construction of 33 buildings on Bishop's Settlement. Workshops opened at Honeysuckle, including loco shed, carriage repair shed, carriage painting shop, machine shop and blacksmith's shop.

1908 -1910 - construction of timber wharves along the reclaimed foreshore. The Monier Sea Wall was completed, an innovative structural material which previously had only been used at Walsh Bay in Sydney.

1910 - 1952 More buildings were constructed, including the Carpenter's Shop, a large foundry, commencement of building at Chullora Railway Workshops (c.1920), signalling the likely scale-back of operations at the Honeysuckle workshops.

1958 - The foundry was closed and its operations transferred to Chullora in Sydney

1970s.- Most buildings were demolished in the Per Way Workshops, leaving only the Store, the Carpenter's and Plumbers' Shops and the Divisional Engineer's Office.

2016: Excavation work in the former rail corridor has uncovered remains of one of the oldest working railway stations in the Hunter, Honeysuckle railway station. Two sandstone walls - between the Hunter New England Health headquarters on Hunter Street and a Honeysuckle Drive office block were found just below the surface 2 weeks ago. These are believed to be remains of platforms from the second Honeysuckle railway station, built in 1872 (Newcastle Herald, 19/7/16, 7).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Developing discrete retail and commercial areas-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining jetties, wharves and docks-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Public tramline system-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Engineering the public railway system-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Providing schools and education-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The group of workshops is the only remaining example that demonstrates the design principles and technology applied to small railway workshop buildings in the 1870s and 1880s in Southeastern Australia.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0095602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental Plan  08 Aug 03 124 
National Trust of Australia register  4475   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Tourism 2007Honeysuckle Precinct View detail
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Honeysuckle Precinct View detail
WrittenInsite Heritage2007Archaeological Investigations of Former Perway Store, Honeysuckle Precinct.
WrittenPaul Rheinberger, Umwelt2003Research Design: Sub-surface Investigation of the Historical Archaeology of the Worth Place/Lee Wharf Precinct, Newcastle, NSW
WrittenPaul Rheinberger, Umwelt Environmental Consultants2003Research Design: Sub-surface Investigation of the Historical Archaeology of the Worth Place/Lee Wharf Precinct, Newcastle NSW
WrittenSusan Duyker, Andrew Sneddon and Mark Dunn, Godden Mackay Logan2003Lee Wharf Newcastle Heritage Impact Statement

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5044977
File number: S90/05371;S94/01096;H05/00083


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.