Yean Cottage, Anglewood Estate | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Yean Cottage, Anglewood Estate

Item details

Name of item: Yean Cottage, Anglewood Estate
Other name/s: Anglewood House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Cottage
Location: Lat: -34.4934134290 Long: 150.4049883670
Primary address: Yean Street, Burradoo, NSW 2576
Parish: Mittagong
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP1044596
   CP/SP77855
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Yean StreetBurradooWingecarribeeMittagongCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Valdis Berzins Pty LtdPrivate15 Mar 99

Statement of significance:

Yean Cottage is a climactic example of the full flowering Queen Anne Arts and Crafts school of architectural and interior design. It is a rare and intact example in Australia of a style of architecture in its fully developed and richly decorated form. It is associated with and is a direct copy of a design by Maurice B Adams a prominent and influential British architect of the Arts and Crafts school and a leading exponent of Queen Anne Revival style. It is associated with the Hon Arthur Bruce Smith Secretary of Public Works and Colonial Treasurer under Parkes in NSW and first Federal Attorney General. It is associated with Dr George Hames Sly, founder of the well known firm of solicitors Sly and Russell. It has long association with an innovative government philosophy in youth training and education through its use as a home and special school for truants. It has an outstanding country house style of garden with many magnificent specimens of mature exotic trees, lawns, formal garden beds and a most unusual and varied collection of conifers. (Heritage Office 1988)
Date significance updated: 18 Dec 00
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Maurice B Adams (house: a close copy of his work); gardens - not known
Construction years: 1890-1890
Physical description: Grounds:
Five acres (Oz Homes News, 2020); q ha (Allen, 2020).
The Anglewood site is located over a gentle northwest trending ridge of moderate elevation. The landform descends from east to north, west and southwest towards intermittent tributaries of Mittagong Creek on the other side of the Main Southern Railway. The creek is itself a tributary of the nearby Wingecarribee River (NTA, 1994).

Both the house and main garden have good aspect owing to their prime position near the central and higher part of the ridge (ibid, 1994).

Garden:
Anglewood is set in a mature garden, sporting majestic trees and a sweeping drive. Terraces and wisteria-covered pergolas lead onto lawns, a tennis court, a 15m indoor pool and pool house with accommodation for live-in staff (Allen, 2020).

Several areas have had extensive benching and other earthworks carried out such that some steep embankments now exist. Overall, the gently sloping natural landform is still readily apparent (ibid, 1994).

The house is surrounded by a superb garden with a magnificent collection of mature exotic trees and a most interesting collection of conifers. Much of the garden design dates back to when the house was built (Heritage Office, 1988).

The site is dominated by large, mature plantings of exotic tree species, many of which date from the turn of the 20th century. While there are no rare species on the site, the size, form and generally good condition of these large trees represent an important resource for the site, both as individual specimens and for their contribution as a group (ibid, 1994).

Apart from only a few exceptions where tree surgery or removal is required, the health of the large tree population is very good, particularly among the conifers that dominate the site. Across the site, the dominant large tree species are:

Monterey pine (Pinus radiata)
Bhutan cypress (Cupressus torulosa)
Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara)
English elm (Ulmus procera)
Colorado spruce (Picea pungens) (ibid, 1994)

Other feature trees include:
Mediterranean/Irish strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)
Sawarra (false) cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera)
Norway spruce (Picea abies)
oaks (Quercus spp.)
coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens)(ibid, 1994).

The dominant large shrub/small tree species (located for the most part near the Anglewood House, main entry and along the drive to the gate house, are:
Cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus)
flowering (Japanese) cherry (P. x serrulata)
rhododendrons (R.spp./cv's)
camellias (C.japonica cv's)
holly (Ilex aquifolium)
pittosporums (P.spp.)(ibid, 1994).

Other feature shrubs / small trees include NZ cabbage tree (Cordyline australis) and various dwarf conifer spp./cv's.

Some of the shrub and understory plantings in the garden beds around Anglewood House, for example, camellias and NZ cabbage trees, date from the earliest garden plantings on the site (NTA, 1994).

Horticultural conditions on site supporting this (above-listed) vegetation include deep, red loams / clay loams that exhibit a friable structure, good drainage and high nutrient levels. These soil conditions, combined with good rainfall and favourable temperatures, provide ideal conditions for the growth of long-lived, cool climate species (ibid, 1994).

While some of the site bears evidence of substantial changes over the past four decades (1950s-90s), there remain some relatively-intact areas from the period of site development associated with the establishment, at least, of the main house (ibid, 1994).

Key elements of the landscape surviving relatively intact include:
- layout of access ways: entry to front of house from Yean (formerly Boodgery) Street; front drive loop; eastern access to, possibly former stables/garages; rear entry from Burradoo Road past the gate lodge;

- evidence of carefully-contrived design intentions through the layout and relationship of mature tree plantings and the space defined by these; arrangment and design of (garden) bedding areas;

- a varied mixture of plant species from ground covers to large, mature trees;

- evidence of high quality detailing for external areas with brick gutter edgings to the main accessways; terracotta edging tiles to garden beds; wirework arches and a pipework Wisteria and rose arbor beyond the front drive loop; an impressive heavy gate with 'Leunig-esque' qualities at the Burradoo Road entry;

- key vistas to the main house from the garden demonstrating the close relationship/interdependence between the two and evidence of 'holistic' site design (ibid, 1994).

The site at the eastern end of the eastern-most accessway as well as the northern and southern garden bed areas are potential archaeological sites. The existing tennis court area may also be a potential archaeological site (ibid, 1994).

The curvilinear accessway alignments are Gardensque in style and typical for the 1890s/1900s period. However, beyond stylistic pretensions the front garden to the north of the house demonstrates a concern to acheive a progression of space and views from which to reveal new aspects of the main house's inherent drama and formal composition. The relationship of the house to the immediate gardens is crucial, since the house has been designed to be admired from all sides but especially so through the composed enframement of the gardens. The landscape has been designed to complement and provide a setting for the house as well as provide picturesque scenery for views from the house (ibid, 1994).

The overall landscape design appears highly theatrical. It employs design devices such as aerial perspective and maximising tonal contrasts to create lively visual tensions. The use of colourful deciduous broadleaf species against a backdrop of dark evergreen conifers is a favourite ploy while the brilliant terracotta tones and light stucco/dark roof tile tonality of the main house sets up strong and delightful contrasts with the surrounding greens of vegetation (ibid, 1994).

Particularly notable details or aspects of landscape quality include:
- the Burradoo Road gate and immediate precinct;
- the densely-wooded corner at the junction of Yean Street and Burradoo Road, and specifically the spectacularly striking and contrasting composition of European aspens (Populus tremula) facing the road apex;
- overall on the site the many contrasting tree forms, texture and tones, providing an interesting and lively series of compositions;
- as with many 'Highland' gardens, Anglewood would exhibit strong seasonal contrasts providing a highly attractive setting, especially in spring and summer (ibid, 1994).

The original expanse of the grounds has been altered to suit the requirements of a school. However the driveway and garden immediately surrounding the house remain intact. The driveway ends in a gently serpentine pattern, past the gatehouse which is sited to make the grounds appear more important than they are. From the driveway glimpses of the rear of the house are seen; it travels along the eastern side, leaving the view of the front until the last second. The turning circle is small, in the shape of a teardrop and is enclosed by a strip of evergreen planting, which includes once fashionable palms and succulents. Original wire arches are placed at regular intervals around the planting belt, taking visitors through to a lawn which is edged with a shelter belt of pines (Cavanough et al, 1988, 55, 57).

The garden beds around the house are semi-circular, some edged with candystick moulded terracotta tiles, and the others with bricks set on a 45 degree angle for a saw tooth effect. The flower bed adjoining the eastern wing of the house is a geometric horse-shoe shaped design dissected by a path of crazy paving. The serpentine paths to the rear of the house would once have taken visitors through a series of colourful flower beds and shrubs that would have led to simply-planted woodland (ibid, 1988, 55, 57).

The quality of the detailing of garden furnishings - from path surface(s) and edgings to wirework and cast iron drainage grates - testify to a determined consistency in the standard of finishes and craftsmanship for the main house (ibid, 1994).

Tennis court, indoor swimming pool and guest quarters (Oz Home News, 6/2020).

House (1890)(Allen, 2020)
Yean Cottage is a very large and elaborately decorated Queen Anne Revival style house, with an extensive and very fine garden. The design of the house and the interior layout is copied very closely from a house called Queensmead Cottage at Windsor U.K. Queensmead Cottage, built when the Queen Anne Style was at its most elaborate flowering was a collection of all Adams ideas on Queen Anne. Anglewood faithfully follows much of this idiom, elaborating on some, such as the arched brick bracing between chimneys at the east end and giving an Australian flavour to others such as Australian plants appearing in moulded plaster detailing (Heritage Office, 1988).

13 bedrooms, nine bathrooms (Allen, 2020).

The exterior of Yean Cottage is principally a soft red brick, much of it moulded or carved in finely detailed ornament. The bricks are said to have been imported from England especially for the house but this has not been established (ibid, 1988).

Striking original black and white marble floor in the entrance with three-storey central light well above (Oz Homes News, 6/2020 quoting current owner, Ms Brennan).

The first floor is timber framed and clad in terracotta shingling, hung with patterned bands of cut tiles. The walls of the first floor bay over the entrance are clad in rough cast render, as are gable ends and bands under some of the eaves. Much of the decoration is very unusual and possibly unique in Australia. Around the entrance bay, at string course level, are a series of curved sandstone blocks with shields, gargoyles, mashs, acanteurs etc. This work is very fine and appears to be in perfect condition (ibid, 1988).

Inside are fine timber panelling, moulded plaster, faience panels, colourful tiles and stained glass. Above the entrance hall was a three storey central light well with coloured clerestroey lighting, now covered over at each floor level. There is a pleasant conservatory on the garden front. Quite a few alterations have been made internally, but some care has been taken not to destroy original material. A modern addition on the west side has occurred as is an external fire stair on the east end (ibid, 1988).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good.
Date condition updated:06 Nov 97
Modifications and dates: c.1944-80s: The original expanse of the grounds has been altered to suit the requirements of a school. However the driveway and garden immediately surrounding the house remain intact.

While some of the site bears evidence of substantial changes over the past four decades (1950s-90s), there remain some relatively-intact areas from the period of site development associated with the establishment, at least, of the main house (ibid, 1994).

Key elements of the landscape surviving relatively intact include:
- layout of access ways: entry to front of house from Yean (formerly Boodgery) Street; front drive loop; eastern access to, possibly former stables/garages; rear entry from Burradoo Road past the gate lodge;

- evidence of carefully-contrived design intentions through the layout and relationship of mature tree plantings and the space defined by these; arrangment and design of (garden) bedding areas;

- a varied mixture of plant species from ground covers to large, mature trees;

- evidence of high quality detailing for external areas with brick gutter edgings to the main accessways; terracotta edging tiles to garden beds; wirework arches and a pipework Wisteria and rose arbor beyond the front drive loop; an impressive heavy gate with 'Leunig-esque' qualities at the Burradoo Road entry;

- key vistas to the main house from the garden demonstrating the close relationship/interdependence between the two and evidence of 'holistic' site design (ibid, 1994).

Any relationship the house once had with the garden to the west has been lost through a number of unsympathetic additions and alterations. The existing front lawn areas beyond the front drive loop have been excavated and, possibly, levelled some time after the Sly family period (ibid, 1994).

While there is a known association between the design and detailing of the house and the distinguished British architect Maurice Bingham Adams. the designer of the gardens remains unknown. Analysis of physical evidence indicates that a designer of above average competence, design skill and knowledge was responsible for the Anglewood landscape layout and composition of species (ibid, 1994).

2002 restoration by existing (2020) owner returning Anglewood to its former residential grandeur (Oz Homes News, 6/2020).
Current use: hotel, cluster housing
Former use: Aboriginal land, country retreat, private school, special school, youth training facility.

History

Historical notes: The land was part of a grant to John Oxley in 1823. Oxley had already been using the area to run cattle by 1819. Deeds were eventually issued to Oxley's sons in 1855. Edward Carter of Sutton Forest owned the land by 1885. Carter sold it to the Hon. Arthur Bruce Smith, KC MHR in 1890 (NTA, 1994).

Anglewood is the original name of Yean Cottage and of the whole Estate. It was built in the early 1890s by the Hon. Arthur Bruce Smith, K.C., MHR., who was Secretary of Public Works for the Sir Henry Parkes government, later became the Colonial Treasurer and was the first Federal Attorney-General.

The design of the house and the interior layout is copied very closely from a house called Queensmead Cottage at Windsor U.K., designed for Colonel the Honourable Reginald Talbot by Maurice B. Adams, RIBA. Adams (1849-1933) was a prominent and influential British architect of the 'Arts and Crafts' school of design. He worked for some years from 1872 as a staff member and then Editor of 'Building News', illustrating all the most important 'Queen Anne' buildings in engravings. Adam was notable for his furniture and interior designs in Queen Anne style, and as an architect for Bedford Park in Chiswick and Bournville near Birmingham became very much involved in the Garden Suburb movement. He became fashionable society architect and designed Caerleon in Bellevue Hill for Charles Fairyase. The construction of this house was supervised by Harvey Kent.

The Smith family never lived at Anglewood. Smith decided it was too far to go all the way to Bowral to catch the train, so he had built his own private railway station, just outside his front gate so he could more conveniently board a train there. The station (Burradoo) is still there today but no train has stopped there for many years.

Early development of the present landscape may date from the early 1900s (NTA, 1994). As a result of the 1890s bank crash, Smith sold the estate in 1908 to Dr. George James Sly, founder of the firm Sly and Russell Solicitors, a large well known firm in the city of Sydney. Dr. Sly and his large family used it as their country house for many years.

In 1932 Anglwood became a private school, an annexe to the King's School (Sydney)(Cavanough et al, 1988, 55). Following Dr Sly's death in 1935 the property was subdivided and auctioned. The lot containing Anglewood is recorded as being transferred to Thomas Oliver Knox, Headmaster of Manly, in 1936. The site was used as a private school from 1936 until 1943, when it was transferred to the government. NSW Premier William McKell re-opened Anglewood as a special school in 1944 (ibid, 1994).

Itt was commissioned as a special school for male truants by the then Department of Child Welfare - the first school of its kind in Australia. The main building, called Yean Cottage was opened by Hon. Clive R. Evatt, K.C., MLA.., on 22 April 1944. Nattai Cottage was opened in 1946 (directly behind Yean Cottage) and Oxley Cottage in 1965. Anglewood continued to function as a special school for truants until 1979, having become co-educational in 1975 (Heritage Office, 1988).

Its subsequent uses included accommodation for adolescent state wards, a base for community groups, a radio sttaion, neighbourhood skills centre and a vacation care programme for local children (ibid, 1994).

The original expanse of the grounds has been altered to suit the requirements of a school. However the driveway and garden immediately surrounding the house remain intact. The driveway ends in a gently serpentine pattern, past the gatehouse which is sited to make the grounds appear more important than they are. From the driveway glimpses of the rear of the house are seen; it travels along the eastern side, leaving the view of the front until the last second. The turning circle is small, in the shape of a teardrop and is enclosed by a strip of evergreen planting, which includes once fashionable palms and succulents. Original wire arches are placed at regular intervals around the planting belt, taking visitors through to a lawn which is edged with a shelter belt of pines (Cavanough et al, 1988, 55, 57).

The garden beds around the house are semi-circular, some edged with candystick moulded terracotta tiles, and the others with bricks set on a 45 degree angle for a saw tooth effect. The flower bed adjoining the eastern wing of the house is a geometric horse-shoe shaped design dissected by a path of crazy paving. The serpentine paths to the rear of the house would once have taken visitors through a series of colourful flower beds and shrubs that would have led to simply-planted woodland (Cavanough et al, 1988, 55, 57).

In 1980, the Department of Youth and Community Services changed the function of the Unit to cater for 24 male and female adolescent State Wards, aged 10 years to 18 years. (Heritage Office 1988),

n 1994 it was subject of a proposed asset disposal by the state government (ibid, 1994). Businessman Valdis Berzin bought it from the government and under the conditions of sale was required to restore the house and undertake a 15-lot subdivision on adjoining land. He fully renovated Anglewood in 2002. returning it to its former residential grandeur (Allen, 2020).

In 1999 approval was granted to adaptively reuse Yean Cottage as an hotel, subdivide its grounds for cluster housing.

In 2020 Anglewood House was placed on the real estate market (https://www.ozhomenews.com.au/historic-southern-highlands-estate-for-sale/).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing rural amenity or character-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing public servants and officials-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the prosperous - mansions in town and country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing politicians-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing professional people-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the prosperous - hill station summer retreats-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing and operating manorial villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. (none)-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private (independent) schooling-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing education-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing health care facilities-
7. Governing-Governing Welfare-Activities and process associated with the provision of social services by the state or philanthropic organisations Rehabilitation of truants from schools-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Arts and Crafts-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Queen Anne-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Holidaying in hill stations and mountain retreats-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Clive Evatt MLC, barrister and state politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Dr George James Sly, solicitor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Arthur Bruce Smith MHR, Clerk of Public Works, Treasurer, Attorney General-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Maurice B.Adams RIBA, British Arts and Crafts architect-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
It is a climactic example of the full flowering of the 'Queen Anne' Arts and Crafts school of architectural and interior design. It is associated with and a direct copy by Maurice B. Adams, R.I.B.A., a prominent and influential British architect of the Arts and Crafts school and a leading exponent of the Queen Anne Revival style. Adams is also represented in Australia through his design in Bellevue Hill for Charles Fairfax. It is associated with the Hon. Arthur Bruce Smith K.C., M.H.R., Secretary of Public Works and Colonial Treasurer under Parkes in NSW and first Federal Attorney General who has the house built as a country retreat. It is associated with its purchaser, Dr George James Sly, founder of the well-known firm of solicitors, Sly and Russell, who used it as a country house for at least 40 years. (Heritage Office 1988)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
It has an outstanding country house style of garden with many magnificent specimens of mature exotic trees, lawns, formal garden beds and a most unusual and varied collection of conifers. The garden illustrates the changes in design of garden layout and choice in plantings which have taken place from the 1890s when the garden was developed to the 1950s when the design was influenced by a keen gardener on the school staff. (Heritage Office 1988)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
It has long association with an innovative government philosophy in youth training and education through its use as a home and special school for truants. (Heritage Office 1988)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
It is a rare and intact example in Australia of a style of architecture in its fully developed and richly decorated form, more often seen in the U.K. in country mansions and large town houses of the late 19th century. (Heritage Office 1988)
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Both the exterior and interior form and detailing are representative of the most developed form of the Queen Anne Arts and Crafts school of architectural interior design. (Heritage Office 1988)
Integrity/Intactness: Quite a few alterations have been made internally, but some care has been taken not to destroy original material. (Heritage Office 1988)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementRestrict access 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementConservation Plan Aug 1 1996
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
1. Maintenance
Maintenance of all components of a place including the fabric, contents and setting, where maintenance means the continuous protective care without causing any damage or change to the existing fabric.

This exemption applies to the full range of heritage items subject to conservation orders, including landscapes and vegetation, rural sites, heritage conservation areas, building complexes, buildings, structures, monuments, Aboriginal and moveable heritage and industrial heritage sites.

Typical maintenance works covered by this exemption include:
* cleaning generally, as well as cleaning out gutters, drainage systems, ponds, dams and other water storage and drainage areas;
*resecuring loose elements of roofs,timber-work and decorative features in the original manner;
* straightening and resecuring fences and gates;
* minor servicing of equipment and services like lifts, air conditioning and fire services, components with moveable parts requiring lubrication like machinery, engines, water reticulation systems, but only where less than half the parts need replacing.
May 23 1997
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0063902 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0063916 May 97 532857
Regional Environmental Plan  01 Jan 86   
Local Environmental Plan 198912 Jan 90 00700288

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Department of Community Services - Preliminary s170 Register1993 State Projects Heritage Group  Yes
Heritage Gardens Study - Final Report NEP 94 7521994 National Trust of Australia (NSW) Parks and Gardens Conservation CommitteeGeoffrey Britton No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAllen, Lisa2020A taste of the UK's Country Mansions nestles in the Southern Highlands View detail
WrittenBrady, Colin1983Anglewood 'Conservation Plan'
WrittenBritton, Geoffrey & Clubley, Garry1995Landscape Assessment for Anglewood, Burradoo
WrittenCavanough, J., Prell, A. & North, T.1988Gardens of the Southern Highlands NSW - 1828-1988
WrittenLester Firth Associates1993Anglewood Property Disposal Report
Writtennot attributed1994Anglewood (article)
WrittenOz Home News2020Historic Southern Highlands Estate for Sale View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5044979
File number: EF10/23471;S90/1408;CHC88/2600


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