Young Street Terraces | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Young Street Terraces

Item details

Name of item: Young Street Terraces
Other name/s: Sydney Hospital Nurses Annex; Nurses quarters; Government Offices
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Government and Administration
Category: Terrace
Location: Lat: -33.8636411317 Long: 151.2112185250
Primary address: 36-42 Young Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT101 DP834054
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
36-42 Young StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

Young Street Terraces are the only buildings that still remain in-situ, demonstrating the latter post-Government House phase of development on the First Government House site. They were part of the early development of this area which became the leading government administrative precinct later in the 19th century. Their relative simplicity contrasts with the more opulent public administrative buildings built at the end of the 19th century showing the change in attitude to public buildings. Together with the Philip Street Terraces, they represent an essentially residential form of building which is now rare in the Sydney CBD. The various adaptations made to the building have been minor and the intention of the residences is still obvious. (NSW Ministry for the Arts, Heritage and Conservation Register, DPWS, 1998)
Date significance updated: 08 Feb 01
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Joseph Paul Walker (?)
Builder/Maker: Joseph Paul Walker
Construction years: 1874-1875
Physical description: The Young Street Terraces are located at the northern area of Sydney's central business district. The terraces are in the Victorian Filligree architectural style. The building consists of four units, each of three storeys and a basement, interconnected on all floors. The building is generally constructed of rendered brick with timber floors, while the basements are of sandstone and soft brick with concrete floors. The roof is clad in colourbond corrugated steel. The verandah and balcony balustrades are of cast iron. Internally, the major walls are either of rendered masonry or plaster and lath on stud. The interior detail is largely intact in terms of skirting, architraves, doors, windows and their furniture, staircases and skirtings, architraves, doors, windows and their furniture, staircases and fireplaces, and the timber surrounds with fluted pilasters on the first floor. Some of the original doors have been reused elsewhere in the building. (NSW Ministry for the Arts, Heritage and Conservation Register, DPWS, 1998)
Modifications and dates: Some of the unsympathetic additions to the original building eg: at rear of the building, some bathroom and kitchen facilities, have since been removed. The building has just been refurbished and the services upgraded to provide modern office amenities and services to the occupants. (NSW Ministry for the Arts, Heritage and Conservation Register, DPWS, 1998)
Current use: Offices
Former use: Aboriginal land, Government Domain, Nurses' quarters; government offices

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

First Government House:
The land occupied by Young Street Terraces was originally part of the grounds of First Government House. In 1851, the land was granted to Municipal Council of Sydney who subsequently subdivided it for sale. Lots 1 and 2 were sold to OJ Caraher in 1866, then on to W Andrews in 1874, and to builder JW Walker later that year. Walker built the terrace houses c. 1874-5 and leased them as offices to the Mining Board (Nos. 36, 38 and 40) and the Dept of Lands (No. 42). Between 1876-81, the Department of Mines opened a mining museum in tow rooms on the ground floor of No. 38. In 1881, Walker sold the property to J Robertson. In 1884 the government resumed the property for PWD offices. Various government departments continued to occupy the terraces until 1936. Between 1937-82 the terraces provided temporary accommodation for nurses from Sydney Hospital, with the offices converted into living quarters. The rear of the site was converted into a car park in 1961. In 1982, the Sydney Hospital relinquished the building which remained unoccupied after the completion of the Museum of Sydney and associated conservation work on the terraces. In late 1997, the building was refurbished by the Dept of Public Works and Services to provide office accommodation for the Sydney Festival and the Historic Houses Trust. The property title was transferred to the Minister for the Arts in 1998. (NSW Ministry for the Arts, Heritage and Conservation Register, DPWS, 1998)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Terrace-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. (none)-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Colonial government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Filigree-

Recommended management:

Retain, conserve, maintain, and adaptive reuse in accordance with the Burra Charter. Refer to and update 1989 Conservation Plan. Seek heritage input and advice from suitably qualified and experienced practitioners when planning and carrying out any proposed works. Conserve fabric that relates to the original construction and subsequent changes made for office accommodation.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0097402 Apr 99   
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenHeritage Group, Dept of Public Works and Services1998NSW Ministry for the Arts Heritage and Conservation Register

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5044993
File number: H00/00336, S95/00333


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