Ozanam House | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Ozanam House

Item details

Name of item: Ozanam House
Other name/s: Hinchcliff's Woolstore, E F House & Marist Chapel
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Warehouse/storage area
Location: Lat: -33.8625159191 Long: 151.2109493990
Primary address: 5-7 Young Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP104784
LOT1 DP723381
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
5-7 Young StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
AMP Life LimitedPrivate04 May 99

Statement of significance:

EF House, formerly Hinchcliff Wool Stores, 5-7 Young Street, is one of only two known examples of its building type left in Sydney. (The other is the building now called Gallipoli House, in Loftus Street, whose appearance has been much compromised.) It has historic significance, evoking a bustling period in Sydney's history, when Circular Quay was the centre of the international shipping trade, and wool was Australia's chief export. It demonstrates the form and quality of the woolstore type that preceded the entrepreneurial display of wool in larger south lit buildings. The building is a handsome element in the streetscape and an intrinsically interesting architectural composition. The remaining timber internal structure, cathead beam structures, and a large hoist pulley characterising the manual lifting of wool to the upper floors, provide the building additional scientific significance. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory)
Date significance updated: 03 Nov 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown
Builder/Maker: Unknown
Construction years: 1865-1882
Physical description: Painted Stucco & Sandstone, Victorian Georgian vernacular style wool stores with masonry walls, king post timber roof trusses, internal timber post-and-beam structure and timber floors.
Modifications and dates: Southern Section c1860, initially single storey, but built in two stages. Southern section built first, c1865 (stone and iron). Timber and iron northern section (stables), initially. Northern Section 1880s, three storey brick and stone with slate roof. 1882 northern store completed
Former use: Aboriginal land, various uses, including mission, chapel, offices, originally warehouse store, School; Chapel

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani ).

Subject site:
The site comprises allotment 12 of Section 103, originally granted to Thomas Woolley by Crown Grant 13th June 1853 and allotment 13 of the same section, originally granted to Thomas Holt Junior by two deeds of grant dated 13 June 1853 by Governor-General Sir Charles Augustus Fitzroy. Holt had acquired the southern (lot 12) by 1863. Holt was born in Yorkshire in 1811, eldest son of Thomas and Elizabeth Hold. Holt Senior was one of the oldest and most-respected wool merchants and manufacturers in Leeds, UK. He went to work in his father's business and was admitted as partner. He worked in London as a wool-buyer and later represented the Leeds House in the wool markets of the Continent, commencing in Spain (Urbis, 2017, 30-31).

Holt's partnership dissolved when his father retired in 1842, by which time Australian wool was making its mark on the world market and the potential of the colony for pastoral and agricultural industries was increasingly recognised. Holt and his wife sailed for Australia aboard the Helvellyn in 1842. Upon arrival, he invested modest capital in propertty in Raymond Terrace, Liverpool, Wollongong and Sydney, including an acre of land in Pitt Stret. He was made a magistrate and as one of Sydney's most prominent financiers was a foundation director and member of several gold-mining, insurance (including the Australian Mutual Provident (AMP) Society) and railway companies (ibid, 2015, 31).

Holt commenced business as a wool merchant with a two storeyed wool and general store two houses below the Haymarket known as 136 George Street South. He had a small dwelling house which adjoined the store. His first export of 31 bales was consigned to England aboard the Hindoo in 8/1844. Invitation to do business was typically inserted in daily newspapers. Holt retired from the wool business in 1854 following a fire which destroyed his George Street store. Holt was granted the northern lot (13) of the subject site in 1853 and had acquired the southern lot (12) by 1863. His allotment is recorded in the 1858 City of Sydney Assessment book as being occupied by Ed Joy and Co., Store and Offices. It was noted as single storey, constructed of iron and wood with two rooms. Sands DIrectory the same year listed it, on what was known as Elizabeth Street North. Early advertisements indicate that Ed JOy and Co. worked in partnership with Andrew Hinchcliff, woolbroker for A. Hinchcliff & Sons. The partnership was dissolved in 1862 and Hinchcliff continued to operate at the subject site. Hinchcliff also leased a house from Thomas Holt in Hay Street (ibid, 2015, 31).

From 1845, Andrew Hinchcliff, reputedly one of the best judges of Australian wool then living, formed a large and lucrative business operating in a dual capacity as a buyer and shipper of wool. Wool-selling brokers formed the link between the producers and the buyers who were the agents of textile mills and HInchcliff was a professional speculator, acting on behalf of principals in Englad. He also established extensive scouring works at Waterloo. In 1864 John Hinchcliff, his only son, joined his father in the trade and in 1882, on his father's death, became senior partner. The firm thereafter conducted as A. Hinchclff, Son & Co. and became widely and favouriably known as one of the oldest and largest firms connected with the wool trade of NSW. Between 20 and 30,000 bales of wool passed annually through the firm for consignment to their London agents, the well-known firm of Edwin Holt & Co., of Leeds and London, although they also conducted local sales on behalf of the growers (ibid, 2015, 32).

It is likely that Hinchcliff had traded at the subject site from at least 1858 (in partnership with Ed Joy & Co., and the site was purchased by Andrew Hinchcliff in 1876. Ownership passed to son John, on his death (ibid, 2015, 32).

The subject store was built in 2 stages. The southern section was built first, and has been dated as early as 1865, however while the site was certainly developed at this time, the City of Sydney Assessment Books indicate that this refers to a previous stage of development (ibid, 2015, 32-33).

1864 was the first recorded entry of the Hinchcliff Wool Store in the Sands Directory, at 1-3 Elizabeth Street North. The City of SYdney Assessment Book records the site in 1867 as occupied by stone and iron structures. THe wool stores were both noted as single storey. It is possible that the single storey structure formed part of the later structure, however this is not consistent with the footprint as the latter building is larger. The 1871 Assessment Book entry records the site as occupied by single storey structures, although the northern store is instead noted as being of stone and iron construction. By 1871 Hinchcliff had leased the adjoining allotment (known as 5 ELizabeth Street North) which incorporated a timber and iron stables and by the late 1870s had also purchased a second store on Castlereagh Street North (later known as 20 Loftus Street). Elizabeth Street North was renamed Young Street by 1896 (ibid, 2015, 33).

The southern store (7 Young Street) was certainly built by 1880 and is recorded in that year's Assessment Book as a three storey brick and stone structure with slate roof. The northern store (5 Young Street) was completed two years later, matching the southern store. The architect or builder of both is unknown (ibid, 2015, 33).

Andrew Hinchcliff, who developed a reputation as one of the best judges of wool in the colony, erected an iron shed in Young Street, at the corner of Custom House Lane, in 1845, and by about 1860 the firm of A Hinchcliff, Son & Co had built a stone wool store next door.

In the late 1880s the iron shed was replaced by a building matching the stone store and erected against its north wall. These are the two connected components that survive today.

Australia's wool industry was hard-hit by the disastrous economic depression of the 1890s. In 1894, ownership of the Hinchcliff Store transferred to Joseph William Dixon, barrister of Summer Hill, who was connected with the Hinchcliff family. Dixon retained ownership until 1903, when it was bought by wool broker Harry Scarth Holt (Artefact, 2017, 20>

In the coming decades the store passed ownership through various woolbrokers (ibid, 2017, 20).
The Bank of NSW, as mortgagor, leased the property in 1937 to German wool buyers.

A mortgagee sale in 1945 saw the property acquired by the Sydney Archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church. This marked the end of the original use of the buildings as woolstores (ibid, 2017, 20).

In 1949 it passed to the Society of St Vincent de Paul and was named Ozanam House, in acknowledgment of the founder of the Society. The Society operated it as the Catholic United Services Australia Navy Club.

In 1952 part of the building was used as the Matthew Talbot Hostel for homeless or destitute men. It included dormitories, a bookshop and soup kitchen on the ground floor, and barber's shop, and laundry in the basement. With the departure of the Hostel to larger premises, a new chapel was created on the ground floor of the 1880s structure in 1966 (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory. This chapel space was rented at a nominal rate by the Marist Fathers as a chapel. Today it is the only part of the building recalling 40 years of the Society of St Vincent de Paul's occupancy (Urbis, 2007, 72, 77-82).

The property was sold in 1988 to the AMP Society. The EF International English School has occupied the balance of the building since 1992. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory). The Marist Chapel on the ground floor continued to operate on a monthly basis until 21005, when it was merged as part of the language school function. In 2012, the language school was still operating on site, while the former Chapel space was in disuse (ibid, 2007).

In late 2019 International restaurateur Scott Brown has taken the old wool store (Hinchcliff House) in the AMP Capital-backed Quay Quarter Lanes, part of the massive redevelopment of an entire city block on Young and Loftus Streets. Brown has picked a name for its Sicilian basement bar - Apollonia. The ground floor will have an all-day eatery with an on-site bakery and flour mill' Brown says. 'The next level up will be a more refined restaurant'. The top floor will include an event space. Luchetti Krelle will design the venue. This is part of a four-storey mega venue with room for 450 people heading to Circular Quay. Quay Quarter will open in September 2020, surrounded by 20 food and lifestyle venues (Bolles, SMH, 3/12/2019, 2).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. River flats-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural - Coasts and coastal features supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Modification of terrain-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Office use-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services commerce-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Developing Commercial Enterprise-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Storing goods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of industrial production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Wool storing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Wharfside and Port Work Culture-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private education-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private (independent) schooling-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Industrial buildings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to industrial structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a restaurant-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Conducting missions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Catholicism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Private Chapel open for community use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Church-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Associated with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Community organisations-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Harris, farm worker, Camden Park gardener-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Andrew Hinchcliff, wool buyer and exporter-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Hinchcliff, wool buyer and exporter-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
This building represents a distinctive period when Circular Quay was the centre of the international shipping trade, and wool was Australia's chief export. Its form and quality typify the kind of woolstore, now very uncommon, that was built merely to store wool as opposed to later woolstores with saw tooth southlight roofs which were built to display the wool as well. It is historically important for its association with the St Vincent de Paul Society which occupied the building for forty years, including its use as a hostel in the 1950s. Has historic significance at a State level. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The interior structure of heavy timber posts, girders seated on stone bolsters, joists and timber flooring is typical of the pre-southlight type of warehouse constructed later in the century. The roof trusses, formed of dressed timber members with common rafters underlaid by boarding to form an attractive ceiling, are unusual. The cathead beam structures and large hoist pulley that characterise the manual lifting of wool to the upper floors are significant. The many loading doorways must have facilitated rapid handling of the wool. Has aesthetic significance at a State level. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Intrinsically attractive, this building is an intact and small composition. Its facade, which addresses three streets, makes an important contribution to the streetscape of Circular Quay. It is also an interesting example of matching designs used in two periods of construction and for its evidence of several campaigns of adaptive re-use. It has aesthetic significance as a representative of the older gable roofed warehouse style, the function of which can still be interpreted. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
It is now a rare example of a building type that preceded the period when wool was displayed and sold to agents locally. (Sydney City Council Heritage Inventory)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing buildings.
Aug 14 1987
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act See File For Schedule

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing materials.
Aug 11 1989
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentDraft CMP prepared by Urbis submitted for information as part of pre-DA consultation. Jul 12 2013
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementUrbis CMP 5-7 Young Street Sydney Jan 29 2016
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0070102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0070111 Aug 89 885533
Local Environmental PlanSydney LEP 2012: Former "Hinchcliff Wool Stores" iI1999*14 Dec 12   
National Trust of Australia register Ozanam House/marist Chapel Facade Formerly Hinchcl655402 Mar 81   
Register of the National EstateOzanam House and Marist Chapel206701 Nov 03   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenArtefact Heritage2018Hinchcliff House, AMP Circular Quay precinct, Historical Archaeological Assessment & Research Design
WrittenArtefact Heritage2015Quay Quarter- Aboriginal and non-aboriginal archaeological assessment
WrittenBolles, Scott2019'Quay to greet mega eatery', in Short Black
WrittenHicks, Megan2018Hughenden Terrace, 59-67 Cavendish Street, Stanmore: these first-class and commodious houses
WrittenUrbis P/L2017Conservation Management Plan - former Hinchcliff Woolstore, 5-7 Young Street, Sydney
WrittenUrbis P/L2015Heritage Interpretation Strategy - Quay Quarter Sydney
WrittenUrbis P/L2015Conservation Schedules - Stage 2 Development Application - Quay Quarter Sydney - Hinchcliff House
WrittenUrbis P/L2015Heritage Impact Statement - Stage 2 Development Application - Quay Quarter Sydney - Hinchcliff House

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5044994
File number: EF14/5501;S91/01397; HC86/0503


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