Epping Forest | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Epping Forest

Item details

Name of item: Epping Forest
Other name/s: River Hill
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.0181419118 Long: 150.8053667110
Primary address: Mississippi Crescent, Kearns, NSW 2558
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT34 DP262269
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Mississippi CrescentKearnsCampbelltown   Primary Address
Raby RoadMintoCampbelltown   Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Frank Lorresti Investments Pty LtdGeneral 

Statement of significance:

Epping Forest is significant as a surviving example of an early colonial farm complex on the Cumberland Plain that retains the layout and fabric of a main house and associated outbuildings sited upon a small hill dating from the 1820s. The integrity of the place has been maintained by the survival of the Old Colonial Georgian style brick house, the slab and log outbuildings, and the survival of a sufficient curtilage of open country around the complex to enable its strategic siting and historical rural uses to still be appreciated and understood. The main house and outbuildings demonstrate in their layers of additional fabric and changing technology the ongoing functioning of the place as both a farm and residence. The overall layout of the complex, including its curtilage, allow for the continuance of a colonial built form within an increasingly late 20th century urbanised location. (Heritage Office 1999)
Date significance updated: 28 Jun 99
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown
Builder/Maker: likely William Kearns
Construction years: 1825-
Physical description: Site:
Epping Forest (River Hill) is a surviving example of an early colonial farm complex on the Cumberland Plain retaining the layout and fabric of a main house and assocaited outbuildings, sited on a small hill, from the 1820s (Morris & Britton, 2000, 103-4).

Garden:
Remnant plantings and carriage drive, retention of a minimum curtilage of open country around the complex to enable its strategic siting and historical rural uses to still be appreciated and understood (ibid, 2000, 104).

Homestead:
Epping Forest is of the Old Colonial Georgian architectural style, constructed of sandstock brick. It has a symmetrical facade and a medium pitched roof and closed eaves. The verandah is under the main roof and has a decorative timber valance and slender turned wooden columns that were cut down when brick balustrading added. The sash windows have very small panes (six to upper sash and four to the lower. Above the six paneled front door is a curved fanlight with very fine glazing bars. It has stone windowsills, door threshold and verandah flagging. To the rear of the house there is a timber and fibro extension.

House is five bays wide, main door has a semicircular fanlight, all doors are six-panelled. House is intact except for main chimney pieces and brick balustrade to the stone- flagged verandah (RNE, 1978).

The interior has plaster walls and marble fireplaces. There is a high proportion of surviving fabric, with original detailing and extant joinery.

Outbuildings:
There are a range of sheds on the site. There are two steel framed corrugated-iron-clad structures, one large rough sawn timber framed cgi clad structure and a number of small rough sawn timber framed annexures. Cladding on the annexures includes corrugated iron and timber slabs (FORM architects, 1999).

Slab and log outbuildings (ibid, 2000, 104).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is fair. Archaeological potential for the site is high.
Date condition updated:28 Jun 99
Modifications and dates: 1810 - land granted to each of the Kearns brothers
c1823 - site consolidated by William Kearnes
c1825 - house constructed
Current use: Vacant
Former use: Aboriginal lland, farm and residence

History

Historical notes: The original inhabitants of the Campbelltown area were mostly people of the Dharawal (sometimes referred to as Tharawal) language group, who ranged from the coast to the east, the Georges River in the west, north to Botany Bay and south to Nowra. However, Campbelltown was a meeting point with the Dharug language group (whose area extended across the Blue Mountains), and early history of the area includes references to both peoples. (Liston, Carol: Campbelltown: The Bicentennial History, 1988; www.abc.net.au/indigenous). Mount Annan, to the south-west of the Campbelltown City Centre, was known as Yandel'ora to its original owners, the Dharawal people and was an important meeting place for Aboriginal people from as far away as northern Queensland and southern Victoria. (http://www.daff.gov.au/natural-resources/landcare/publications/making_a_difference_a_celebration_ of_landcare/section_6_-_indigenous_landcare)(LEP).

With the establishment of the convict colony in Sydney Harbour in 1788, the displacement of Aboriginal people began. A smallpox epidemic decimated many of the coastal clans, but was less destructive amongst the inland peoples. Escaped cattle from the settlement moved south and bred in the Campbelltown/Camden area and after their discovery in 1795, the area became known as The Cow Pastures (or Cowpasture). In 1805, John Macarthur obtained a grant of 5,000 acres (later expanded to 10,000 acres) in the area, some of the best grazing land then known in the colony (LEP).

By 1809, 34 settlers had received grants in the newly named Minto district (named after Lord Minto, the Governor-General of India) in the northern portion of Campbelltown. Many of these early settlers were Irish, including surveyor James Meehan, who allocated himself a generous portion (now Macquarie Fields). Prominent settlers included surgeon Charles Throsby, who was allocated 600 acres (now Glenfield), Dr William Redfern (Campbellfield), Dr Robert Townson (Varroville) and Richard Brooks (Denham Court)(LEP).

Though peaceful, the Dharawal people bore the brunt of a punitive expedition led by Captain James Wallis in 1816. At least 14 Dharawal people were massacred at Appin, to the distress of sympathetic settlers such as Charles Throsby of Glenfield. The Appin massacre of 1816 was a devastating and tragic event for the Dharawal people and other local clans, and was a difficult period in terms of the relationship between Indigenous people and European settlers. Corroborees and other ceremonies continued under the protection of the Macarthurs of Camden, though numbers steadily declined, with diseases introduced by the Europeans also having a devastating effect on the Dharawal population (LEP).

As the district became more closely settled, a town was needed further south than Liverpool. Campbelltown was formally established in 1820 and named 'Campbelltown', in honour of Mrs Elizabeth Macquarie's maiden name of Campbell. In 1826, the town plan was formalised (LEP).

Between 1835 and 1845, the number of Aboriginal people in the Campbelltown Police District had decreased from twenty to none. However, limited tribal life continued and corroborees were still held at Camden Park and Denham Court until at least the 1850s. During 1858, approximately 200 Aboriginal people attended the celebrations at Campbelltown that were held to mark the opening of the railway line (LEP).

Airds
This early name used to describe the entire Campbelltown area. Governor Macquarie, on his first visit in 1810, wrote: 'I intend forming this tract of country into a new and separate district for the accommodation of small settlers, and to name it Airds in honour of my dear good Elizabeth's family estate (in Scotland)'. Airds was widely used at first but as individual local villages came into being, the broad name fell out of use and it wasn't rebordn until 1975 when the NSW Housing Commission converted bush farms at 'South Kentlyn' into a new housing estate - Airds (Macarthur Advertiser).

Kearns and Epping Forest:
The land was part of the district of Minto and was formally granted by Governor Macquarie in 1810 to Matthew and John Kearns in two adjoining 100 acre parcels. The conditions of these grants required at least 25 acres of each parcel to be cultivated and allowed for the logging of timber on the land owned by the Crown. The location of the land within the grant that was cultivated and any areas which were officially logged is unknown.

By the early 1820s the land had passed into the hands of William Kearns who was recorded as having lived there in 1823. The house on the site was built shortly after (1825) by William Kearns (research by Rosemary Broomham, cited in ibid, 2000, 103) and the property has been improved to include orchards, grain crops and general dairy farming. Some of the outbuildings and sheds would have been built as early as the 1820s although most of them were clearly built during later phases of the farming use of the farming use of the property.

Matthew Kearn's grant was known as River Hill and was part of a prosperous and established neighbourhood around the new settlement of Campbelltown. While the farm was called River Hill, the area was called Epping Forest (Morris & Britton, 2000, 103).

Epping Forest likely commemorates London's Epping Forest, at 6000 acres, the largest open space in that city. Nestled between Greater London and Essex, it was designated a Royal Forest by Henry II during the 12th century. In the 18th century, it became notorious for highwaymen, such as Dick Turpin. Attempts to enclose it caused uproad among locals. The 1878 Epping Forest Act not only saved the forest but others, in England, from enclosure. Epping Forest was taken into the care of London City Corporation (Hight, 2011, 56).

An aerial photograph from 1947 shows the orientation of the house toward the creekline and the layout of the immediate garden where, typical of rural properties where water was scarce, decorative gardening was confined to a small area - providing a foreground to the views over cleared paddocks toward the creekline. The photograph shows the carriage drive from Raby Road (now severely truncated) and the location of outbuildings in a largely cleared, farmed landscape. The property remained in a similar state until its sale in 1978 (ibid, 2000, 103).

The property remained in the hands of the family until 1960. During this period it passed through the hands of a number of family members but was in constant use as a farming property. After 1912 the property included an Ayreshire cattle stud and a private race horse stud along with the already established dairy farming interests. Mixed herd dairying was included in the 1960s (p 20 & 21). A contextual history by Nicole Secombe discussed the significance of Epping Forest as both a dairy farm and, on a state level, as an Ayreshire cattle stud. More recent research by Broomham of land title led to the conclusion:
'As the property shows a longer chain of continuous ownership that (than) Rouse Hill - having from 1823 at least one member of the family continuously in residence - the original farm house and outbuildings are rightly seen to be significant.' (ibid, 2000, 103).

Subdivision since the 1980s has meant Epping Forest is approached via a different route from the original entry drive from Raby Road, although that part of the drive closest to the homestead and mature vegetation has been retained (ibid, 2000, 103).

A 2017 subdivision application was refused by Campelltown City Council, primarily due to a lack of information which meant it could not be adequately assessed. The applicant appealed the decision in the Land and Environment Court in late 2017 (Chenoweth, 2018, 4).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Modification of terrain-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Dharawal Nation - suffering invasion by disease-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. Irish rural building practises-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Orcharding-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming wheat and other grains-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Cropping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of food production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Forestry-Activities associated with identifying and managing land covered in trees for commercial purposes. Timber getting-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Dairying-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Horse breeding and raising-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for lamb and mutton-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Modifying landscapes to increase productivity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Pastoral homestead-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for wool-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use cattle-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working in orchards-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working with animals-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working independently on the land-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Colonial-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - colonial period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living on the urban fringe-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Horse riding-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Leisure-Includes tourism, resorts.
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing local clubs and meeting places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Belonging to an historical society or heritage organisation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Joining together to study and appreciate local history-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (later Maj-Gen.) Lachlan Macquarie, 1810-1821-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Elizabeth Macquarie, Governor's wife and taste-maker-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Matthew Kearns, settler and farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Kearns, settler and farmer-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The house was built in the Old Colonial Georgian architectural style, circa 1825. The site contains a high level of occupational evidence, such as the gardens, fences, outhouses and sheds, which demonstrate how the inhabitants used the building.The site demonstrates its role as a residential dwelling and farm for one hundred and forty years.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The inclusion of the verandah under the hipped roof, makes Epping Forest, one of the more unusual Colonial houses, when compared to the more usual practice of the verandah being expressed separately.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Until recently it was in the continuous occupation by descendants of the original pioneers who built it.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The dairy structures date from 1820 and provide a record of early dairy practice. The 1920’s additions to the dairy sheds demonstrate the changes to dairy and building technology during the previous century.
Integrity/Intactness: The degree of extant fabric is high, however the structure is not in good condition.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Epping Forest (River Hill) is significant as a surviving example of an early colonial farm complex on the Cumberland Plain retaining the layout and fabric of a main house and assocaited outbuildings, sited on a small hill, from the 1820s. The integrity of the place has been maintained by the survival of the house, slab and log outbuildings, remnant plantings and carriage drive and the retention of a minimum curtilage of open country around the complex to enable its strategic siting and historical rural uses to still be appreciated and understood (Morris and Britton, 2000, 104). Generally, there is a need to allow a generous area of open space around the main buildings and tree group so that some appreciation of its traditional agricultural form is attainable. Epping Forest retains a semblance of 'rural' land around it to some extent but the ability to appreciate the original entrance from Raby Road has been lost, it has been given a suburban street front address at a distance with full kerb and gutter (although this could be reversed) and has had new residential housing encroach close on one side, to the rear of the house. Despite this, some appreciation of it and its former setting can be gained when viewed from Raby Road. The current curtilage and zoning [Special Uses 5 (a) Historic Site; Residential 2(a), DCP] is partially successful when compared to nearby Eschol Park. Despite some housing which has been allowed between Epping Forest's homestead and the creekline, due to the natural topography and use of the land beyond the creek for recreational purposes, some traditional views of the house from the south, south-east can be had. The best views of the farm group are from the south, across the land proposed for subdivision. Similarly the use of the area to the north of the immediate curtilage of the house as a playground has meant that the farm group, which includes an appreciation of its setting, is still partially discernible (ibid, 2000, 104). If the signficance of a property is primarily as a farm complex, then it is essential that a generous curtilage be set. This is clearly evidenced by the treatment of nearby Eschol Park which, once prominent in the neighbourhood, is submerged in a sea of housing and associated vegetation and unable to be interpreted in an appropriate setting - demonstrating the need to allow a generous area of open space. The May 2000 development proposal was to substantially reduce the curtilage of the property. It was to demolish a number of sheds and establish a treed buffer one. This would (have) effectively block the appreciation of the former farm from the south/south-west, the direction from which the complex is most readily interpreted. Any suggestion that the land in front of the main house could be used for 'limited development' would seriously erode the interpretibility of the homestead in its setting. The concept that by restricting the height of development 'to the east of the site the topography of the original grant may be interpreted enabling a sense of the original outlook to be retained' is not, in our opinion, achievable. As argued elsewhere, buffer planting and gardens associated with new development would likely obscure important views from and to Epping Forest (ibid, 2000, 105). If the curtilage is reduced, the potential range of possibilities for re-use are diminished. This possibility is admitted under FORM's section 1.01 Issues: 'The matter of the future sustainability of the extant structures on the site will depend upon the ability of the site to attract sufficient funding for future maintenance. This may be through sale or lease, adaptation for commercial or residential use or grant from Federal, State or Local Government.'. An alternative solution to subdivision would be to sell the property to a new owner. There are an increasing number of people who are interested in conserving early colonial farms and exploring avenues of adaptive reuse. A similar situation arose recently for the former Blaxland property - The Hermitage - at Denistone, where Ryde Council refused an application to further subdivide the remnant curtilage. A key consideration was that a potential new owner, prepared to appropriately adapt the place, would be less-likely interested in it where its integrity was compromised by further subdivision and inappropriate development in close proximity (ibid, 2000, 105). Recommendations There should not be any further subdivision of the Epping Forest landscape curtilage. A proactive role should be taken to encourage a better outcome for the place. Heritage Agreement to drive its future (recommended) (ibid, 2000, 105).

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0129813 Aug 99 925797
Heritage study  01 Jan 93   
National Trust of Australia register NTA (NSW) Suburban Register743101 Mar 86   
Register of the National EstateEpping Forest326421 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Campbelltown Heritage Study199310583(not stated)  No
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW20004.29Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)Colleen Morris & Geoffrey Britton Yes
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenChenoweth, Ben2018'Plea to preserve farm'
Management PlanForm Architects2000Epping Forest Mississippi Drive Kearns : Conservation management plan
WrittenHight, Julian2011Britain's Tree Story - the history and legends of Britain's ancient trees
WrittenMacarthur Advertiser Our Heritage - exploring the history behind Macarthur's suburb names View detail
WrittenMountford, Rod1999From Georgian Box to a Verandahed Vernacular - an investigation of standing structures, vernacular rural buildings in the County of Cumberland NSW 1788-1828

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5045019
File number: H98/00113


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