Lake Innes House ruins and environs | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Lake Innes House ruins and environs

Item details

Name of item: Lake Innes House ruins and environs
Type of item: Archaeological-Terrestrial
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -31.4963519036174 Long: 152.873950318852
Primary address: The Ruins Way, Port Macquarie, NSW 2444
Local govt. area: Port Macquarie-Hastings
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Birpai
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT603 DP754434
LOT2 DP826241
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
The Ruins WayPort MacquariePort Macquarie-Hastings  Primary Address
Lake InnesPort MacquariePort Macquarie-Hastings  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Office of Environment and HeritageState Government16 Apr 98

Statement of significance:

Lake Innes House ruins and environs is a major historical monument to the pre 1850 period of settlement of Australia. Its key role in the early development of a region in NSW is made poignant by the evocative ruined remains of a surprisingly large establishment and the existence of detailed contemporary records (Boswell) of day to day activities during its decline. It contains an extensive archaeological resource for the study of Australian architecture, gardening, farming history and early 19th century domestic arrangements. In the above respects it is a rare resource because of subsequent inactivity and the existence of contemporary records (journals, drawing and plan). The house ruins are one of a small number of large colonial period domestic ruins in NSW. In its growth and planning it testifies to the confidence and aspirations of those who became quickly rich on Government resources during the 1830s and in its swift decline and ruin it symbolises the sudden demise of this class as a result of the 1840s economic recession (Clive Lucas & Partners, 1987)

Lake Innes Estate is of state cultural significance for its natural and cultural values. The place is of significance for its remnant wetland areas, koala population and other threatened animal species.

The place also contains rare cultural evidence relating to the layout and functioning of a large seaside estate including largely archaeologically intact outbuildings, industrial areas (brick-making sites and roads), convict, servant guest and resident accommodation.

The combination of written and physical evidence related to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal occupation of the site make the Lake Innes Estate an outstanding research resource.

Historically the association of the place with prominent colonials such as Innes, the Macleays and Boswell is an important element of the significance of the place.

Lake Innes Estate is significant to the local and regional community as demonstrated through community action beginning in the 1940s and 1950s and continuing through to the public participation and interest in the ongoing conservation programmes at the site.

Lake Innes Estate is also of significance for its interpretive and educational potential. The Estate is capable of demonstrating a number of local and state historic themes. The major themes relate to Aboriginal occupation, history and land tenure; the local environment and the impact of human settlement; convictism and the rise of the middle classes in nineteenth century Australia; expansion and exploration at the edge of European settlement through commerce, pastoralism and agriculture; and the development of townships such as Port Macquarie in the north coast region of NSW.

(NSW Parks and Wildlife Service 2000)
Date significance updated: 16 Apr 98
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: Major Archibald Clunes Innes
Construction years: 1831-1848
Physical description: Setting:
Lake Innes House and associated sites are located on and adjacent to a southerly - pointing peninsula of land between Lake Innes and Innes Swamp. The main site is 11 kilomotres south of the town of Port Macquarie, the house being well sited on rising ground. The vegetation of the area consists of sclerophyll forest on the drier ground, with tea-tree and casuarina on the swamps and reed beds around the lake margins. In the hey day of Lake Innes House it appears that its immediate area consisted of gardens and cleared land, with an attractive view across the lake towards Mount Seaview in the distance

Diaries of the Innes' niece Annabella Boswell (nee Innes) between 1843-8 noted the existence of a vineyard and a 'new flower garden' with hollyhocks, used for an 1843 birthday celebration dinner table decoration (Carlin, 2009).

Very little above ground evidence of Lake Innes House's once renowned garden appears on site today although layout, paths etc may well survive below the ground surface and its cover. Close to the house to one side are two enormous clumps of giant bamboo (Bambusa balcooa), a common feature of gardens of this ambition and scale at the time, certainly amongst notables such as the Macarthur family, Governors etc (pers.comm., Stuart Read, 23/7/09).

House:
The ruins of the house and stables consitute the major physical evidence of the Innes property, although a number of other related sites are known to exist or are suspected to exist in the area. These include the reamins and sites of servants' cottages, an estate-workers' village, a farm that supplied the house with food, a brickmaking site, a corduroy road towards the beach, another corduroy road to the lake, a boathouse by the lake and probably other sites yet to be located.

The two main wings of the house form an L-shaped structure, the living rooms facing west with views over the lake and the bedroom wing facing south to avoid the heat of the sun. Adjacent to the courtyard behind were the kitchen, accommodation for male visitors (the bachelors hall), servants quarters, laundry store, wine cellar, dairy and the underground cistern that provided the household water supply. At the eastern end of the bedroom wing were a bathroom, privies and a boiler for providing hot water in the bathroom. The surviving standing remains comprise but a small part of what was once a 22 room mansion and its associated buildings.

Outbuildings:
Adjoining the house to the north east and connected to it by a common wall with the servants' quarters and associated facilities is the stables complex. In addition to stabling for a number of hores and accommodation for carriages and storage for harness, this complex contained living spaces for stable workers. The structure is in a better state of preservation than the house with many of the walls still standing to the roof level.

Boswell's diaries include note of a separate schoolroom in which the Innes children were educated.

Both house and stables are made of handmade sandstock bricks and similar brick was also used at most of the related sites. Brick sizes are fairly uniform but probably varied a little depending on the mud in use and the irregular finish. Most probably the bricks were manufactures on the property from clay whcih came from a source not far from the house, on the eastern side of the road from Port Macquarie. (The Archaeology of Lake Innes House, National Parks and Wildlife Service)

The construction of the house and stables would have used large quantities of various types of wood: for roof framing, shingles, flooring, skirting boards, fireplace-surrounds, window and door frames, the window and doors themselves, verandas, stairs and so on, but very little has survived on the site.

.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is poor. Archaelogical potential is high.
Date condition updated:16 Apr 98
Current use: Ruin, interpretation site
Former use: Residence, rural holding

History

Historical notes: Lake Innes House was constructed in several stages between about 1831 and 1848, with most of the work being completed by 1843. It was built by Major Archibald Clunes Innes (1800-1857), who was born at Thrumster, in the far north east of Scotland, and arrived in Australia in 1822 with the 3rd regiment of Foot (the Buffs). Following service in Hobart and Sydney, he was briefly Commandant of the Penal Settlement at Port Macquarie from 1826-1827.

After returning to Sydney and resigning from the Army, he was married in 1829 to Margaret Macleay, one of the daughters of Alexander Macleay, the Colonial Secretary, and Innes and his wife were amongst the first free settlers in the Port Macquarie area. He eventually acquired substantial land holdings and business interests on this part of the North Coast and on the adjacent New England tablelands, where his name is remembered to this day in the town of Glen Innes.

His main property, however, consisted of an area of 2560 acres (1036 hectares) near Port Macquarie, on which he constructed a house that gradually grew to the proportions of a country mansion. Innes was convinced that Port Macquarie would become the main gateway to the coastal area around the Hastings River and to nearby New England. he thought that the port would develop as a means of bringing in supplies from Sydney and elsewhere, and as the outlet for wool from the Tablelands. He was proved wrong: the bar at the entrance to the Hastings was too dangerous to encourage much shipping, and the road that was built up to the Tablelands was found to be a difficult route.

Subsequently it was to be Newcastle and the Hunter Valley that was to provide the principal access to new England. Nevertheless, during the 1830s he prospered, and it was only during the 1840s that personal miscalculation and general economic depression brought him near to insolvency.

The end of the transportation of convicts to New South Wales and the closure of the Port Macquarie Penal Settlement also deprived him of a source of cheap labour, that he had used in the building and running of his house, as well as in some of his other ventures. In the end he was forced to seek government employment and he and his family moved to Newcastle in 1853, where he died a few years later.

In its hey day of the 1830s and 1840s, however Lake Innes House was an important social centre on the edge of settlement, at which Major Innes dispensed generous hospitality to a succession of house guests who in 1847 included even Sir Charles Fitzroy, at that time the Governor of NSW and his wife.

Valuable documentary sources survive from that period, including the diary of Annabella Boswell, a niece of Major Innes, who lived in the house from 1843 to 1848 (Department of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology University of New England, 1994).

Archibold and Margaret's niece Annabella Boswell (nee Innes) was a pupil of Margaret's, and left a description of the education provided at Lake Innes in the years 1843-7. A special school room was set aside on the property where Margaret instructed her own children - Eliza who was 11 years (old) in 1843, Gordina 7 years and Gustavus 5 years - plus two nieces, Annabella 17 years and her 14 year old sister. "My aunt was a strict disciplinarian, and as long as she lived I stood in awe of her. She carried on the schoolroom work admirably, and allowed no trifling or idle moments. How she managed to devote the morning so entirely to us, having so many other claims on her attention, is now a mystery to me. We flew to the schoolroom at ten o'clock from the breakfast table; she followed in half an hour and remained until one o'clock. We at once read together the Psalms of the day, said texts, Collects, a hymn or portion of Scripture; then followed quickly our various lessons, which we had prepared before breakfast or the previous evening; then we did sums for half an hour while she devoted herself to Gustavus; after that we wrote to dictation, our interest in this never flagging, and our anxiety about our mis-spells was never-failing. I undertook to hear my youngest cousin practise daily and to assist her with her lessons."

In her role as schoolmistress, Margaret did not act completely alone. When the children were small, she had nurses and governesses to care for them and to take part in their education.

"Gustavus had a Scotch nurse...The Girls had a governess, Miss Paine by name, a truly good woman, but more than eccentric...devoted to my cousin Gordina, then a dear little girl of four...I have no doubt her teaching influenced the child's whole life...(There was) a lady who came every week to give music lessons, and stayed always one night."...

In the family tradition, Margaret established her own library at Port Macquarie and stocked and replenished it from Sydney. 'There was a good library in the house' cousin Annabella recalled, 'and a regular supply of books from the Sydney library'. (Windshuttle,1988, 44-5).

"On Saturday 24th June, lunch was held at Lake Innes House in honour of Alexander Macleay (Margaret Innes' father)'s 76th birthday. Annabella Boswell described the party, which:
"went off with great eclat, and then the whole party went out on the lawn...we found about twenty natives assembled there and dancing vigorously, while Bruce played. When they had finished, Dido proposed that we should dance a reel, and at once the whole party seemed inspirec with a wish to join, and really there could not have been a gayer scene; we four girls in white frocks and pink sashes and bows flying through the dance pursued by nimble partners...".
She also described the decoration of the dining table with a large silver epergne (or centrepiece) and top-heavy floral arrangement almost reaching the overhead lamp consisting of
"some fine hollyhocks (Althaea sp.)(gathered) from the new garden, about two feet high...The large crystal bowl was filled with fine white salt (or sand), and the stems of the flowers supported in it; when all was completed I saw it placed on the table with not a little complacency". (Carlin, 2009).

"The beginning of 1848 was a very quiet time with us, my uncle had had very serious losses, and the establishment at Lake Innes was greatly reduced. Port Macquarie was comparatively deserted, as all the Government officials had been removed. The steamer no longer plied between there and Sydney, so it had ceased to be the port from New England" (Boswell, A., (1848, in) 1992, 1).

On an 1848 visit to Brownlow Hill at Cobbitty Annabella Boswell commented: "I am much interested in the botanical books in the library here, and wish I knew something of botany. It is however, a great pleasure for me to look at the drawings of flowers and fruit, the former more various than I had imagined to exist. We recognised in these books many of our own flowers, growing both at Capita and Port Macquarie (Lake Innes), but I must own that they are excelled in beauty and variety of colouring by the Cape (of Good Hope, i.e. South African) bulbs, many of which we have seen growing at the Lake (Innes)." (Boswell, A., in Crittenden, 1992, 5). Later in the same diary she notes that winemaking will have commenced at the Lake (Innes), thus intimating that vineyards formed part of the estate at that time (ibid, 66).

Following the departure of Major Innes and his family, the house was occupied and owned by a number of people. It was derelict by the beginning of this century and subsequently deteriorated to its present state as a result of a combination of natural decay, vandalism and theft of building materials (Department of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology University of New England, 1994).

C.1909 Phillip Charley (one of the partners of what became Broken Hill Proprietory (B.H.P.) bought the Port Macquarie estate of Lake Innes and used it for logging (Johns, 'Who's Who', 49; Hungerford,1995, 124-125).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Creating a gentleman's estate-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Growing vines and maintaining vineyards-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming by detainees and prisoners-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of scenic beauty-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the prosperous - mansions in town and country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Mansions-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing working animals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating convicts-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to tourist-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Selecting land for pastoral or agricultural purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on pastoral stations-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Major Archibold Clunes Innes, Penal Settlement Superintendent, Soldier, Farmer, Public Servant-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Margaret Macleay, daughter of Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Annabella Boswell, gentlewoman, diarist, writer-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
It is directly associated with Major Archibald Innes who was a prominent entrepreneur in NSW during the 1830s and 1840s and the owner of a very large pastroally based empire. He exemplified a class of colonial capitalists and speculators dominant in NSW in the period 1820-1845. The place contains physical evidence of the focus for the hisotry of the land settlement of the New England region. (Clive Lucas & Partners 1987)
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Major Archibald Innes (1800-1857) was a key figure in the development of Port Macquarie and the New England area. He was one of the largest and wealthiest landholders in NSW comparable to John Jamieson, Henry Dangar, Richard Jones and William Lawson. Glen Innes in northern NSW was named after him.

His push to make Port Macquarie the coastal link for the New England region is a key factor in understanding the settlement of this region.

Margaret Innes, one of the daughters of Alexander Macleay, is likely to have had a strong influence on the development and layout of the garden house at the Lake Innes estate refecting her personal and family interests in scientific pursuits.

The establishment of the Lake Innes Estate represents the rise of the landed upper and middle classes in NSW towards the end of the period of convict transportation.

The basis of Innes' wealth and the construction of his was dependant upon convict labour.

Innes' convict labour supplied goods for the Port Macquarie penal settlement.

The end of transportation played a major role in the decline of Lake Innes House and Major Innes' financial enterprises.

In the context of land settlement, the Lake Innes Estate is historically rare in a regional and state context as an example of an 1840s estate with the full range of estate functions still visible in the landscape.

The lake Innes Estate is representative of the impact of the end of convict transportation on individuals as well as the colony as a whole.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The stables are an unusually substantial and architectural coutyard stable complex and although ruined are of a rare scale and unique formal design for such colonial buildings in Australia outside Tasmania. The place is one of only a few seaside estates built in NSW in the colonial period and demonstrates contemporary attitudes to landscape design and estate planning shown in the siting of buildings, location of roads and the construction of a lookout tower. (Clive Lucas & Partners 1987)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The place has been a historical site in the minds of people of the Port Macquarie area and others interested in Australian history for the past 100 years. The immediacy of its historical, evocative and romantic appeal has for many years added to its reputation as an historic site. (Clive Lucas & Partners 1987).

The Birpai Local Aboriginal Land council have a strong interest in the management of the Lake Innes Peninsula in particular in the location and management of Aboriginal sites. Sights along lighthouse beach have been assessed as having very high significance to the local Aboriginal people.

Regional visitation to the site as interesting ruins commecnced as early as 1900 and visitation has occurred ever since

The popularity of NPWS guided tours indicate that there is a strong level of local interest in the site.

The Port Macquarie Historical Society has maintained a strong interest in the site since at least the 1950s and holds a number of key items and documents associated with the site including Boswell's diary and a dress belonging to her. The Society has also demonstrated its interests in the site through publications.

Press coverage of the NPWS conservation works and UNE archaeological works over the last decade has demonstrated, and helped to maintain, public interest in the site.

Proffessor Graham Connah's Lake Innes investigations have employed many students and ex-student volunteers since 1993. The site has formed an important part of their training and the archaeology programme has generated community interest and support. Connah has raised substantial funding for the current research programme indicating a broad interest in his research into the site.

Hastings City Council see Major Innes as a potential focus for cultural tourism in Port Macquarie. Major Innes, and sites associated with him, are considered to be of the highest importance in the local community. Motels, roads and other features in the municipality are named after him.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The place is a unique resource for the study of Australian architecture, gardening, farming history and early 19th century domestic arrangements. The place contains roads which are good examples of convict built civil engineering works to survive unaltered in NSW. The house has the rare remains of an earlt atteached bathroom and boiler room which had hot and cold water services and possibly a sewage system. (Clive Lucas & Partners 1987)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The house ruins are one of a small number of large colonial period domestic ruins in NSW. It is a rare resource because of the existence of contemporary records (journals, drawing and plan). The Lake Innes Peninsula has natural landscape values of state significance. These inhclude the existence of a viable and healthy koala population and koala habitat as well as a number of other animal species listed under the threatened Species Act.

Much of the wetland area is protected under State Environmental Planning Policy 14 (SEPP 14:P Wetlands) and is one of the few major coastal wetlands in NSW not affected by flood mitigation drainage schemes.

The natural and cultural scientific and research potential of the Lake Innes Estate is rare in a state context.

The extent and integrity of the archaeological remains, including standing archeological remains are rare and provide a unique research opportunity in NSW.
Integrity/Intactness: While the structural integrity of Lake Innes Estate and associated sites is medium to low the archeological integrity of the entire site is high. Due to the limited development of the Innes peninsula following the death of Archibald Innes, there is still clear visible evidence of the main house and stables and other associated sites which supported the function of the main household. Evidence of brick manufacture, food production and servants' accomodation are all evident on the site. Apart from some illegal digging by fossickers and past researchers on the site, the archeological resource is substantially intact in many areas as demonstrated by the first excavations in 1999.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) Repair and maintenance to existing roads including grading, filling where necessary and lopping of overhanging trees and branches.
(ii) Repair and maintenance to existing fences and gates.
Sep 20 1985
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1)Repair and maintenance to existing roads including grading filling where necessary and lopping of overhanging trees and branches.
(2) Repair and maintenance to existing fences and gates.
Mar 13 1987
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementLake Innes Estate CMP CMP covers archaeological elements as well as setting and associated sites Dec 19 2000
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0099702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental Plan  23 Dec 94   
Local Environmental Plan  08 Jun 01 95 
National Trust of Australia register  4747   
Register of the National Estate - Interim14557    

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Wyong Shire Heritage Study1994S19Rod Howard Heritage Conservation Pty Ltd  Yes
National Parks & Wildlife Service Section 170 Register  National Parks & Wildlife Service  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Tourism 2007Lake Innes House ruins and environs View detail
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Lake Innes House ruins and environs View detail
WrittenBoswell, Annabella1992Further Recollections of my early days in Australia - Annabella Boswell's Other Journal 1848-1851
WrittenCarlin, Scott2009Alexander Macleay & Scottish Traditions in Colonial NSW, in "Highland Fling: Elizabeth Bay House, Sunday 26 July 2009" programme
Management Plan (HC endorsed)Catherine Snelgrove, for NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (NPWS)2000Lake Innes Estate CMP
WrittenClive Lucas & Partners1987Lake Innes House - Conservation Analysis and Draft Conservation Policy
WrittenConnha, Graham2002"The 2001 excavation at Lake Innes Estate, Port Macquarie, NSW"
WrittenDepartment of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology University of New England1994Lake Innes House Port Macquarie Brochure
WrittenHungerford, M.1995Bilpin, the Apple Country
WrittenJohns1922Who's Who in the Commonwealth of Australia
WrittenNational Park and Wildlife Service The Archaeology of Lake Innes House
WrittenNSW National Parks and Wildlife Service1999Lake Innes Nature Reserve: plan of management
WrittenThe Interpretive Design Company2016Innes Ruins Heritage Signs View detail
WrittenWindshuttle, Elizabeth1988Taste & Science: The Macleay Women

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045031
File number: S90/05364


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