Rose Seidler House | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Rose Seidler House

Item details

Name of item: Rose Seidler House
Other name/s: In neighbourhood precinct with Marcus Seidler House and Teplitzky House or Rose House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.7096845188 Long: 151.1419210810
Primary address: 69-71 Clissold Road, Wahroonga, NSW 2076
Parish: Gordon
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Ku-Ring-Gai
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOTA DP372495
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
69-71 Clissold RoadWahroongaKu-Ring-GaiGordonCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Office of Environment and HeritageGeneral22 Oct 98

Statement of significance:

Rose Seidler House is historically significant as a resource to demonstrate the many features of Modernist art, architecture and design theory and practice. It is one of the finest and purest examples of mid-century modern domestic architecture in Australia as designed by the second generation of twentieth century Modern architects. It also contains intact contents of late 1940s furniture by such renown designers as Eames, Saarinen and Hardoy. Rose Seidler House is socially significant because of its influence on the character of domestic architecture in New South Wales, not only by direct imitators in the 1950s but on the thinking of architects and architectural practice in subsequent decades. It is technically significant for its design detailing and choice of construction methods and materials which highlight aspects of postwar housing construction in a period of conservative building regulations, scarcity of materials, skills and industrial processes. The house incorporates many examples of modern domestic technology and commercial products which were introduced into Australia at this time. These include electric appliances, labour saving devices, materials, fittings and storage systems (Historic Houses Trust 1989:9).

For more information see www.teachingheritage.nsw.edu.au/tn_seidler_a/index.html. Teaching Heritage website: Rose Seidler House.
Date significance updated: 08 Dec 08
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Harry Seidler
Builder/Maker: Builder: Bret R.Lake
Construction years: 1948-1950
Physical description: Setting and Garden:
Rose Seidler House is part of Harry Seidler's conceptual planning of a family compound of three modernist houses, inspired by north-east American prototypes. The relationship of architecture with landscape, the house in a cleared space with few, deliberately-retained eucalypts, demonstrates one of the principal tenets of modernism - the contrast between man-made object and nature (order/disorder) - the built form set against space and time (Morris, 2007, 10).

However the garden that evolved around one of Australia's iconic prototypal modernist houes became an expression of the recent immigrant Rose Seidler's personal creativity. It was both typically suburban in the choice of planting and idiosyncrathic in the integration of terraced citrus orchard with ornamental plants. Mrs Seidler particularly delighted in growing plants that she could not possibly have grown in Vienna or in England: frangipani (Plumeria rubra), oranges, port wine magnolia (Michelia figo) and Queensland firewheel tree (Stenocarpus sinuatus). The story of the garden adds a layer of richness to the intepretation of the house (ibid, 2007, 10).

Three garden characteristics are present on the site. There is indigenous bushland still covering large sections of the site. But modern landscaping of the driveway and the immediate area around the house, rough stone retaining walls and ramp. The resident gardening of Rose Seidler permeates the site and subtlety infiltrates both the native bushland and the modern landscaping (Historic Houses Trust 1989:48-56).

House:
Rose Seidler House is a modern two storey, 12 room house sited on one hectare of suburban bushland with intact gardens. The house is constructed of four basic materials; natural bush stone, reinforced concrete, timber and glass.

The ground floor is elevated to the north and east sides. The stone foundations provide three walls of the double garage. A large recreation area on the north side is partially sheltered by the ramp and sundeck of the first floor. The two storey open well filters light through to this area. A caretaker's flat is located at the end of the recreation area.

The main entrance door is via a small foyer. Stairs lead up to the first floor and the comforts of a fireplace and a magnificent vista of the Ku-ring-gai bushland through a wall of glass. There are four inter-related features of the interior planning scheme.

Each room except the main bathroom has a full view, bringing the outside, inside. There are full glass walls in the living, dining, playroom and 3 bedrooms; above waist height windows in the kitchen, laundry and main bedroom and above shoulder height in the en-suite bathroom. Direct or close contact to related outdoor areas is available for each room.

The bi-nuclear plan clearly separates living areas from sleeping and bathrooms. These are connected by the flexible transitional zones of the playroom and deck.

Spatial freedom and flexibility of spaces is maximised and achived by the arrangment of functional and temporary dividers that redefine spaces according to their use.

The minimal interiors aim to produce visual tension or counterpoint through 'tensional opposition' of recurrent elements, forms, planes, colours, and materials. The smooth neutral plaster walls counterpoint the rough texture of the sandstone. (Historic Houses Trust 1989:48-56).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is excellent. Archaelogical potential is low.
Date condition updated:24 Sep 97
Modifications and dates: In 1948 structural plans were completed and construction commenced. Completed in 1950. First major renovations were undertaken in 1971 including recarpeting, repainting and some new electrical and bathroom fittings. A second major renovation was undertaken in 1981 which included exterior maintenance and interior redecorating. The third major renovation was undertaken in 1988 (Historic Houses Trust 1989:41-43).
Current use: House Museum
Former use: Aboriginal land, residence

History

Historical notes: In 1855 to 1856 the Lands Department put up for Crown Land Auction a large area from St Ives Public School to the present Clissold road, Wahroonga that included the Rose Seidler House site. For twenty years not one lot was sold and in 1877 the whole area was bought by William Billyard. After passing through several hands undeveloped, the mortgagee, The Sydney Land Bank and Financial Agency Co came into possession of it and subdivided the whole area into 38 allotments of 2-10 acres in 1893 and was called the "Pymble View Estate."

During the turn of the century the more accessible areas attracted the attention of the developing middle class who were seeking property suitable for large houses and generous gardens in bushland settings. In the more inaccessible pockets such as Clissold Road, tradespeople and gardeners established market and flower gardens, orchards, dairies and poultry frams with an array of homebuilt shacks and sheds.

The gazettal of the Cumberland County Plan in 1951 led to the promoting of neighbourhood areas whilst retaining open space and green belts. This planning scheme led to a new wave of developers and middle class professionals who were attracted to the bushland settings and vistas for architect-designed homes.

In 1948 Harry Seidler arrived in Sydney to build a house for his parents and decided upon Clissold Road. The Seidler family purchased 16 acres for 500 pounds. Harry Seidler had envisaged a family estate. He strategically sited three houses which were flanked by an S shaped driveway. There was provision for a swimming pool and communal areas in the centre of the triangle formed by the houses. The communal housing estate was surrounded by vegetable gardens and indigenous bush.

Rose Seidler house was built between 1948 and 1950. By 1952 the 16 acres had been divided into 3 lots and by 1956 Marcus Seidler House and Rose House had been completed. The Seidler family lived here for the next twenty years.

During this time subdivisions occurred and in the late 1960s Harry Seidlers parents passed away. Rose Seidler House was leased out until 1980. In 1981 Harry Seidler renovated the interior and exterior of the house.

In 1988 Harry Seidler officially handed over Rose Seidler House to the Corporation Sole, Minister Administering the Heritage Act. The property was leased to the Historic Houses Trust for use as a public house museum (Historic Houses Trust 1989:11-29).

More than a gift of extraordinary personal generosity, this added a further century's development to the discourse on design, architecture, history and heritage that is at the heart of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW (now Sydney Living Museums)'s work. Introducing an Australian modernist icon to HHT's collection of 19th century properties opened the Trust up to a whole new audience as it asked questions about 'heritage' in a 20th century context. The HHT's 'Fifties Fair', held every year at Rose Seidler House, reflects its commitment to engage new audiences in the business of heritage. Every August, on a sunday, rockabillies and modernist collectors, families and architecture students all come together to celebrate the era and share their love of the house. Rose Seidler House also provides the HHT with an opportunity to be a leading voice in debates around heritage, architecture and design and to explore in depth questions about modernism and the rise of the 'McMansion'. On 20-21 October 2011, as part of the Sydney Architecture Festival, a star cast of Australian architects, designers, curators and commemtators came together in a symposium at the Museum of Sydney titled 'Australian houes of the 1950s and 1960s' to explore the significance of houses of this era. As we continue to pull down fine examples of these houses and replace whtm with McMansions, it is worth questioning what we are trading off. Why aren't these structures seen as part of our heritage? (Lieberman, 2011, 13).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Eccentric residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Architectural design-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing professional people-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing migrants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th century Suburban Developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the suburbs-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Garden-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing museums-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Technological innovation and design solutions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating an icon-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Modernist-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - mid 20th century modernism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - 20th century Modern Movement-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 2000-2050-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living on the urban fringe-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a bushland setting-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Physical evidence of creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses, through domestic artefacts scatters, ar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a new house-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor concerts and performances-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Developing collections of items-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Belonging to an historical society or heritage organisation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing and maintaining a local museum-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Harry Seidler Architect 1923 - 2006-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Penelope Seidler, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rose Seidler, gentlewoman, gardener-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Rose Seidler House is historically significant as a resource to demonstrate the many features of Modernist art, architecture and design theory and practice. (Historic Houses Trust 1989:9)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Rose Seidler House is one of the finest and purest examples of mid-century modern domestic architecture in Australia. A product of the second generation of twentieth century Modern architects. Rose Seidler House contains intact contents of the late 1940s furniture by such renown designers as Eames, Saarin and Hardoy. (Historic Houses Trust 1989:9)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Rose Seidler House is socially significant because of its influence on the character of domestic architecture in New South Wales, not only in direct imitators in the 1950's but on the thinking of acrhitects and architectural practice in subsequent decades. (Historic House Trust 1989:9)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Rose Seidler House is technically significant for its design detailing and choice of construction methods and materials highlighting aspects of postwar housing construction in a period of conservative building regulations, scarcity of materials, skills and industrial process. The house incorporates many examples of modern domestic technology and commercail products that demonstrate the introduction of electric appliances, labour saving devices, materials, fittings and storage systems into Australia. (Historic Houses Trust 1989:9)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Rose Seidler House is managed by the Historic Houses Trust on behalf of the NSW Heritage Office.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act New order made. Refer to 57(2) exemption gazetted 27/2/1998. Jul 17 1992
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events. Refer to 57(2) exemption gazetted 27/2/1998. Feb 27 1998
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2)

I, the Minister for Planning, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act, 1977, do, by this my order:
(1)revoke the existing exemptions made to the Historic Houses Trust under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act; and
(2)under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act grant an exemption from all section 57(1) activities to properties owned or managed by the Historic Houses Trust and listed on the State Heritage Register as outlined in Schedule A with the following conditions:
(a) that the Historic Houses Trust provide an annual report to the Heritage Council on future works proposed for its properties;
(b) that the Historic Houses Trust advise the Heritage Office archaeologists of any proposed works requiring major excavation at its properties to allow due consideration of the need for additional archaeological work;
(c) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must lodge all archaeological monitoring or excavation reports prepared with the Heritage Office library on completion after review by Heritage Office archaeologists;
(d) that the Historic Houses Trust employ as required a consultant historical archaeologist with appropriate archaeological qualifications, knowledge, skills and experience and the Director of the HHT must obtain the advice of that person about the heritage significance of the archaeological resource and/or the impact of the development proposal on the heritage significance of the archaeological resource, and take that advice into account;
(e) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must take into account as far as practicable the cumulative effect of approvals on the heritage significance of the item and on the heritage resource of its area;
(f) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must ensure that approvals are in accordance with any requirements, guidelines, regulations and general conditions issued by the Heritage Council. The Director of the Historic Houses Trust may impose additional conditions which do not conflict with any Heritage Council conditions.

The Hon Frank Sartor MP
Minister for Planning
Minister for Redfern Waterloo
Minister for the Arts

11 April 2008

SCHEDULE A

Item State Heritage Register Listing Number

1. Elizabeth Farm 00001
2. Rouse Hill House 00002
3. Elizabeth Bay House 00006
4. Glenfield Farm, Casula 00025
5. Hyde Park Barracks and The Mint 00190
6. Exeter Farm (Meurant's Cottage) 00205
7. The Rose Seidler House 00261
8. Wentworth Mausoleum 00622
9. Justice and Police Museum 00673
10. Meroogal, Nowra 00953
11. Vaucluse House 00955
12. Government House, Sydney 01070
13. First Government House Site (Museum of Sydney) 01309
14. Susannah Place 01310
Apr 24 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0026102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0026116 Dec 83 172 
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental Plan  15 May 91   
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Rose Seidler House View detail
WrittenBritton, Geoffrey; and Morris, Colleen2001Grounds Conservation Management Plan for the Rose Seidler House, Wahroonga
WrittenCurran, Helen2016'New England comes to the North Shore: Rose Seidler House'
ElectronicHeritage Office and NSW Board of Studies2000Teaching Heritage Website: Rose Seidler House - Urban Expansion View detail
ElectronicHeritage Office and NSW Board of Studies2000Teaching Heritage Website: Rose Seidler House Gallery View detail
WrittenJacobs, Genevieve2007'Meet your national management committee: NMC chair Colleen Morris in conversation with journal editor, Genevieve Jacobs'
WrittenLieberman, Dr Sophie2011'A Rose by any other name: reflections on Modernism, Heritage & the 1950s'
VideoSeidler1959Seidler home footage
WrittenSeidler, Penelope1950Scrapbook View detail
ElectronicThe Historic Houses Trust of NSW2004Museums View detail
ElectronicThe Historic Houses Trust of NSW2000Rose Seidler House Information View detail
Management PlanThe Historic Houses Trust of NSW1989Rose Seidler House Conservation Plan
TourismTourism NSW2007Rose Seidler House View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045033
File number: S90/05313; S96/00465 [S170]


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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