Goulburn Pumping Station, Marsden Weir & Appleby Steam Engine | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Goulburn Pumping Station, Marsden Weir & Appleby Steam Engine

Item details

Name of item: Goulburn Pumping Station, Marsden Weir & Appleby Steam Engine
Other name/s: Goulburn Steam Museum Pump House
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Utilities - Water
Category: Water Pump House/Pumping Station
Location: Lat: -34.7369444206 Long: 149.7040063750
Primary address: Wollondilly River, Goulburn, NSW 2580
Parish: Goulburn
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Goulburn Mulwaree
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Pejar
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP1119777
PART LOT11 DP1123614
LOT4 DP1126066
PART LOT1 DP951293
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Wollondilly RiverGoulburnGoulburn MulwareeGoulburnCumberlandPrimary Address
off Fitzroy StreetGoublburnGoulburn MulwareeGoulburnArgyleAlternate Address
off River StreetGoulburnGoulburn Mulwaree  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Goulburn Mulwaree CouncilLocal Government19 Mar 99

Description

Construction years: 1885-1886
Physical description: Set on the banks of the picturesque Wollondilly River at Marsden Weir, Goulburn, New South Wales.

Built in 1885, the steam operated pumping facility provided Goulburn's first reticulated water supply. The pumphouse still contains the original Appleby Bros. Beam Engine pump and Lancashire Boilers.

This unique facility is the only complete, workable beam engine powered municipal water supply left in its original location, in the Southern Hemisphere. The buildings and engine are of national significance and are listed on the NSW State Heritage Register (Goulburn Waterworks Museum, 2005, amended).
Current use: Museum
Former use: Municipal water supply system

History

Historical notes: Set on the banks of the picturesque Wollondilly River at Marsden Weir, Goulburn, New South Wales.

Built in 1885, the steam operated pumping facility provided Goulburn's first reticulated water supply. The pumphouse still contains the original Appleby Bros. Beam Engine pump and Lancashire Boilers.

Goulburn Waterworks: 1886
Becoming operational in January 1886, the Waterworks, on the banks of the Wollondilly River, provided a reticulated water supply to the growing City of Goulburn .

The pumphouse was powered by timber - wood piles fired the boilers 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Before 1886 the residents of Goulburn would have collected water in tanks or wells, or purchased supplies from a carter. The demand of the growing city resulted in the Rivers and Harbours Board installing a waterworks on the Wollondilly River at Rocky Point powered by a steam operated beam engine. Water was pumped from the river to a filtration plant and reservoir, then gravity fed to residents of the city.

Appleby Beam Engine
The original 1883 Appleby Bros. steam engine situated inside the pumphouse was one of four installed in Pumphouses around NSW. The others were at Wagga Wagga, Albury (both scrapped in 1936) and Bathurst . The steam engine is known as a beam engine because of the large overhead rocking beam that transmits motion from the pistons to the cranks.

This great beam engine, of the type first invented by Thomas Newcomen in 1712, is an example of the powerhouse that drove the Industrial Revolution. Originally designed for pumping water out of mines in the UK it was improved by Watt, Smeaton, Maudsley and other engineers of the steam age until it became a very efficient and reliable engine.

Apart from mines and water supplies, many thousands were used to drive factory machinery in the 18th and 19th centuries - some four operated in factories in Goulburn - until they were superseded by electric motors in the early 20th century.

Goulburn's Beam Engine 1883
The Goulburn Waterworks engine is of medium size and produces 120 horse power. It has compound cylinders and a jet condenser. The fly wheel is 5 metres in diameter and at 18 r.p.m. the pumps delivered 660,000 litres of water per hour.

The two boilers that produce the steam that powers the engine, are located in the western wing of the building.

Fired by wood or coal, they produce high temperature steam that is piped through to the beam engine in the central part of the building. Only one boiler would have been operational at any one time. The other being shut down for regular cleaning and maintenance.

Steam from the boilers enters the valve chest on the cylinders from where it is transmitted to the cylinders by means of a valve mechanism. The action of the steam on the pistons causes them to reciprocate. Rods connect the pistons to the beam at one end, and to the crank at the other. This converts the 'rocking' motion to rotary motion which makes the flywheel turn, giving a smooth and continuous action

By 1918 the beam engine had became obsolete when electric motors were installed.

Idle for many years, Goulburn's Beam Engine was restored in 1958.

The Pumphouse
The east wing of the building houses a horizontal steam engine, the Hick Hargreave (see separate page) and the early dynamo room with its electric pump.

The Waterworks is notable not just for its historic steam engine, but for the elegant Victorian building that houses the beam engine and boilers. Only metres away further up the hill stands the original fireman's cottage, also of Victorian design.

Horizontal Engine by Hick, Hargreaves & Co., England , c 1860.
From 1968 the Goulburn Waterworks operated as a museum of engines. It was during this period that a grant was made available under the Regional Employment Development Scheme (1975) which saw some of this funding used for the installation of the Hick Hargreaves engine now on display and operational on steaming days, in the annexe of the pumphouse.


The single cylinder horizontal engine measures 9 metres in length, weighs 17 tons with the flywheel being 4 metres in diameter.
It was originally used to power equipment in a Sydney tannery, becoming discarded in 1961. It was reported that it had been acquired to represent the nest stage of steam engine development after the beam type engine (Goulburn Waterworks Museum, 2005).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences Technologies for reticulated water supply-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing civic infrastructure and amenity-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Providing drinking water-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on public infrastructure projects-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act maintenance & gardens


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material.
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, pruning and tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
Jun 26 1987
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions Sep 5 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0035602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0035629 Jun 87 1093639

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenGoulburn Waterworks Museum2005Goulburn Waterworks Museum View detail
WrittenIntegrated Design Associates Goulburn Pump House and Steam Engine Museum Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez rez rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045044
File number: S90/05331 & HC 32906


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.