Residence | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Residence

Item details

Name of item: Residence
Other name/s: AKA 8 Magic Grove
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.8356687280 Long: 151.2398208810
Primary address: 28 Mistral Avenue, Mosman, NSW 2088
Parish: Willoughby
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Mosman
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP556986
LOT4 DP611597
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
28 Mistral AvenueMosmanMosmanWilloughbyCumberlandPrimary Address
26-28 Mistral AvenueMosmanMosmanWilloughbyCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 

Statement of significance:

28 Mistral Avenue has historic and aesthetic significance as a rare Sydney example of a residence designed by the noted architect E. Jeaffreson Jackson around the turn of the century (1900) in the shingle (Federation Arts & Crafts) style displaying a North American influence. The house is essentially intact and retains most of its original external detailing and materials including its timber shingles, casement windows and terracotta tiles. The house is complemented by its tennis court and street tree planting of brush box (Lophostemon confertus) trees. (Branch Head's report no. 203/79, 18/9/1979, modified by Read, S., 25/5/2007).

Jeaffreson Jackson was an influential and innovative architect in the area of residential designs with examples of his work appearing in Arts and Architecture and other leading magazines of the day. There are 9 known residential examples of his designs surviving in Sydney, of which 3 are located in Mosman. The small number and quality of his designs warrant recognition and protection under the Heritage Act (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

The property has historic associations as the home for 36 years of a former president of the Legislative Council of NSW and managing editor of the Land newspaper, Sir Harry Budd, and his family until his death (1978)(Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1981, modified by Read, S., 25/5/2007).

The grass lawn tennis court forms an essential part of the curtilage of the building and has been designed to relate to it as the garden front. This site is considered to form the minimum comfortable curtilage for the house (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

No. 28 Mistral Avenue is sited opposite that of another house designed by the same architect producing an important group relationship. Both houses are essentially intact and located on corner sites, this combined with their two storey height, similar style, distinctive designs and landscaped setting of extensive lawns produces an interesting townscape element (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

A large residence set in extensive grounds that, by virtue of the composition of its three major unified wings, avoids overly dominating its setting (LEP, 2001).
Date significance updated: 23 May 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: E. Jeaffreson Jackson
Physical description: Site:
(The house) It is set above street level with a stone retaining wall at the street frontage. (LEP, 2001). The house still enjoys a large site, though it is placed to the rear of its allotment and a tennis court dominates the front garden. (Moore, 1988).

The grass lawn tennis court forms an essential part of the curtilage of the building and has been designed to relate to it as the garden front. Subdivision of all the original garden has occurred and this lawn tennis court area, which exists under separate title represents the last potential building site. However this site is considered to form the minimum comfortable curtilage for the house. The retention of this site as a grassed tennis court is realistic both in physical and economic terms as the shortage of suburban courts has ensured that houses with one command a premium price, particularly in Mosman (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

House:
Inter War Arts & Crafts. Large, two-storey rambling Inter-War Arts & Crafts house. The ground floor is in face brick, the upper level in timber shingles and the roof of terracotta. Features include bay windows, hoods and small pane windows. A tennis court on the street frontage is visually intrusive (LEP, 2001).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The house is essentially intact and retains most of its original external detailing and materials including its timber shingles, casement windows and terracotta tiles. It is complemented by its grass tennis court (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).
Date condition updated:25 May 07
Modifications and dates: The original property included no. 26 Mistral Avenue, an adjoining vacant block of landscaped garden which existed under a separate title. This block has been sold and a house is being built on it. (Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1981).

The grass lawn tennis court forms an essential part of the curtilage of the building and has been designed to relate to it as the garden front. Subdivision of all the original garden has occurred and this lawn tennis court area, which exists under separate title represents the last potential building site. However this site is considered to form the minimum comfortable curtilage for the house (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

Lady Budd said that the house had been altered before her family lived there and that she and her husband had made several extensive renovations. "We bought the house from people named Jesson, who had let it for many years," Lady Budd said. "The Jessons put in the tennis court." The Budds had the house re-roofed when the tiles started to deteriorate "about 20 years ago" and had installed fireplaces in 2 of the upstairs bedrooms. A china cabinet downstairs hid another fireplace. A long living room downstairs, originally two rooms separated by sliding doors, was altered and dark wooden panelling, typical of pre-war interior design, was removed. The Budds also made extensive alterations to the kitchen, converting two pantries into a scullery and laundry.(Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1981).

1988+: Addition of a garage & parent`s bedroom
Swimming pool installed, c2000.
Minor alterations (LEP, 2001).
Current use: residence
Former use: residence

History

Historical notes: The original Mistral Avenue property included no. 26, an adjoining vacant block of landscaped garden which existed under a separate title. This block has been sold and a house is being built on it. (Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1981).

The residence was designed by the noted architect E. Jeaffreson Jackson around the turn of the century (1900) in the shingle style displaying a North American influence. The house is essentially intact and retains most of its original external detailing and materials including its timber shingles, casement windows and terracotta tiles. The house is complemented by its tennis court and street tree planting of brush box (Lophostemon confertus) trees. (Branch Head's report no. 203/79, 18/9/1979).

The house was the home for 36 years of a former president of the Legislative Council of NSW and managing editor of the Land newspaper, Sir Harry Budd, and his family until his death 3 years ago (1978). Describing the house as a "nice, cosy family house but with no history and little architectural merit", Lady Budd said yesterday that the house had been altered before her family lived there and that she and her husband had made several extensive renovations. "We bought the house from people named Jesson, who had let it for many years," Lady Budd said. "The Jessons put in the tennis court." The Budds had the house re-roofed when the tiles started to deteriorate "about 20 years ago" and had installed fireplaces in 2 of the upstairs bedrooms. A china cabinet downstairs hid another fireplace. A long living room downstairs, originally two rooms separated by sliding doors, was altered and dark wooden panelling, typical of pre-war interior design, was removed. The Budds also made extensive alterations to the kitchen, converting two pantries into a scullery and laundry.(Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1981).

A 1979 Heritage Branch report dealt with the then current sale of 26-28 Mistral Avenue to a development company whose plans involved a part subdivision of its grounds for a new house and renovation of the existing house. The house forms part of a classified area by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) - the Magic Grove Group, consisting of two houses. Both houses in the group were designed by E. Jeaffreson Jackson and are stylistically related to each other.

The grass lawn tennis court forms a part of the curtilage of the building and has been designed to relate to it as the garden front. An order would ensure that any subdivision of the third lot would retain its trees and that any new house would be appropriately sited and designed to blend with the existing. (Branch Head's report no. 203/79, 18/9/1979).

In response to the proposed subdivision and sale of 26-28 Mistral Avenue, the site was made the subject of an interim conservation order on 14/12/1979. The site of the side garden has now been sold and the erection of a house approved under section 60 of the Heritage Act. This proposed house has been designed in sympathy in terms of siting and design to the existing Federation house.

This residence, together with the landscaped front area containing the grass tennis court, was sold separately at auction, subsequent to the order being gazetted.

Jeaffreson Jackson was an influential and innovative architect in the area of residential designs with examples of his work appearing in Arts and Architecture and other leading magazines of the day. There are 9 known residential examples of Jeaffreson Jackson's designs surviving in Sydney, of which 3 are located in Mosman. The small number and quality of his designs warrant recognition and protection under the Heritage Act (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).
The other two Jeaffresson Jackson houses in Mosman are Tregoyd, the home of Sir Tristan and Lady Antico on the Balmoral slopes and 17 Calypso Avenue, opposite 28 Mistral Avenue (Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 1982).

No. 28 Mistral Avenue is sited opposite that of another house designed by the same architect producing an important group relationship.

Both houses are essentially intact and located on corner sites, this combined with their two storey height, similar style, distinctive designs and landscaped setting of extensive lawns produces an interesting townscape element.

The grass lawn tennis court forms an essential part of the curtilage of the building and has been designed to relate to it as the garden front. Subdivision of all the original garden has occurred and this lawn tennis court area, which exists under separate title represents the last potential building site. However this site is considered to form the minimum comfortable curtilage for the house. The retention of this site as a grassed tennis court is realistic both in physical and economic terms as the shortage of suburban courts has ensured that houses with one command a premium price, particularly in Mosman (Branch Manager's report no.376/81, 6/10/1981).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing public servants and officials-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Federation Style residential development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Arts and Crafts-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with E.Jeaffresson Jackson, architect-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0021002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0021019 Feb 82 280716
Local Environmental Plan  23 Feb 01 41 
National Trust of Australia register Part of Magic Grove Group8217   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Mosman Heritage Study1996297Godden Mackay Logan P/LGA/CK No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenFelicity Richards, in the Mosman & Lower North Shore Daily, 25/3/19821982Order on Mosman Home - designed by US Architect
WrittenM.Shearman, Manager, Heritage Branch1981Branch Manager's report no.376/81, of 6/10/1981
WrittenMoore, Robert A., Architects & Conservation Consultants1988(letter dated 23/8/1988) Re: 28 Mistral Avenue, Mosman
WrittenN.Bignold, Acting Head, Branch Head, Heritage Branch1979Branch Head's report no. 203/79, of 18/9/1979

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045051
File number: S90/01980 & HC 32340


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