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Reussdale

Item details

Name of item: Reussdale
Other name/s: former Presbyterian Manse
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Presbytery/Rectory/ Vicarage/Manse
Location: Lat: -33.8811223892 Long: 151.1851736280
Primary address: 160 Bridge Road, Glebe, NSW 2037
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP1157302
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
160 Bridge RoadGlebeSydneyPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Carlode NomineesPrivate 

Statement of significance:

Possibly the earliest example of High Victorian architecture in Glebe with some unusual features. Built by Ferdinand Reuss c1868. One of the most interesting and original of the Victorian picturesque Gothic style houses still standing in Glebe. It is of particular note for its association with Ferdinand Reuss, an active Sydney architect and builder from the 1860s to the 1880s. It forms part of a group developed by Reuss on this section of Bridge Road. The group is unified by its attractive steetscape, as well as by its historical associations with Reuss.

It is one of the most impressive buildings of its period. But for physical deterioration, and later additions to the rear, its fabric survives essentially unaltered. It is interesting for its marrying of Picturesque Gothic and Italianate influences and is a good early example of both. The building features the best materials available at the time and some of the most elaborate decoration. The exposed, apricot-brown brickwork is of special note, as is the unusual pointed bay window and the excellent stone and timber detailing.

The relationship of the building to its neighbours contributes to its interest. The building and its immediate neighbours are distinguished from later buildings in the street by their deep setbacks. The deep setbacks and generous grounds also provide a setting appropriate to the magnificence of the architecture. Although little remains of the original front gardens these setbacks, and the large trees surrounding, provide a suitable setting for such a grand architectural statement and contribute to the Gothic atmosphere of the main frontage. Some of the site's trees appear to date back to the original construction. (Smith, 1989, Perumal Murphy, 1989, amended Read, S., 2004)

Interesting group of Victorian suburban villas of varied style (by the same architect) with generous mature gardens, around a contemporary (if not original) church. Numbers 160,154 and the church are particularly interesting architecturally. These houses and gardens, dominated by the former church and spire, form a leafy suburban precinct of great charm in spite of the present condition of the properties owned by the Presbyterian Church. (Source: AHC - data from the nominator - not revised as yet).
Date significance updated: 30 Mar 04
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Ferdinand Reuss
Builder/Maker: Ferdinand Reuss
Construction years: 1868-1870
Physical description: The site is located on the southern side of Bridge Road, Glebe between Glebe Point Road to the east and Ross Street to the west. The site is rectangular in shape and has an area of approximately 3,362 sqm. The site is large, the buildings more or less equally spaced with a well planted garden area in front. The site is currently occupied by the following three existing buildings:

1. Reussdale: A 19th century (c.1870) two storey Victorian Pictuesque Gothic Revival villa designed by Ferdinand Reuss, prominent architect and builder. The building has been vacant since 1969. It is in poor condition as a result of a fire, vandalism and lack of maintenance over the years. Reussdale is listed on the State Heritage Register. New corrugated iron roof and barge boards installed in 1996 (Original roof was tiles, by then in very poor condition);

2. The Abbey: A former Presbyterian Church originally constructed on the corner of Parramatta Road and Glebe Point Road in 1876. The church was demolished and re-erected at its current location in 1927-28. Since 1979 (until c.2003) the Abbey has been used as a restaurant and function centre. During the conversion process the walls were reinforced, a new roof and floor were installed, and a suspended ceiling. The Abbey is listed as a heritage item under the Leichhardt LEP2000; and

3. Hamilton Cottage: A nineteenth century Victorian style single storey brick cottage. Constructed in the 1870s as a small cottage by F. Reuss, it was later adapted for use as a community hall and school when the Presbyterian Church occupied the site. The building is in a poor condition. In Particular, the interior has been modified extensively. The interior walls were removed, large steel tie beams were added and a large portion of the ceiling has fallen. Hamilton is listed as a heritage item under the Leichhardt LEP2000. It has creeping fig (Ficus pumila var. pumila) and clematis sp. creeping over the northern faade.

Setting
There is a large asphalt parking area at the rear of no.s 156 and 158 Bridge Road. Setbacks from Bridge Road are staggered. The former church is closest to the road alignment and Reussdale the furtherest. The site is bounded by Hewit Avenue on the south-west and Reuss Street at the rear. Reussdale is built right to the Hewit Avenue boundary. There is a stone fence along the front boundary with a number of iron gates.

The relationship of the building to its neighbours contributes to its interest. The deep setbacks and generous grounds also provide a setting appropriate to the magnificence of the architecture. Whilst very little remains of the original gardens some of the site's trees appear to date back to the original construction. Presently they contribute to the Gothic atmosphere of the main frontage. (Perumal Murphy, 1989)

Reussdale: (Source, Smith, 1989)
Built by 1871 and probably dates to the later 1860s. Planned as an asymmetrical cottage with a tower in the re-entrant angle above the entrance. The house possesses several unusual features such as the treatment of the walls. The back and side walls are rendered - the normal treatment of walls at this time. But the front of the house is of exposed, apricot-brown brickwork, speckled with crushed coal. And the unusual bay window features a triangular pointed frame unique in Glebe.

The decorative enframement of windows and doors is expressed with considerable vigour. The sandstone lintels are carved from one block to simulate segmental arches, some with prominent keystones. And they rest on prominent corbels with classical moulding. Wrought iron is used about the window sills, but cast iron has been avoided. The verandah posts are of wood with fretted wood brackets. The gables are carved elaborately.

The top of the tower contains a diagonal pattern of glass brick beneath the eaves, placed about a course of head? And sawtooth laid bricks. This interest in the colour and laying of bricks is unusual in Glebe at this time. The general vigour of the decoration, suggests Reuss had come into contact with the writings of Ruskin and Butterfield. Reussdale appears to be the earliest example of High Victorian domestic design in Glebe.

Trees - oldest/largest
Mature trees on site (from 1989 photographs in Perumal Murphy) include:

Nettle trees (Celtis sinensis) - large one on eastern side fence of Hamilton, two in front of Abbey on Bridge Road fence, two large ones in north-west corner in front of Reussdale, several west of and close to the Abbey, two close to Abbey walls on eastern side, several at rear (south-west) on boundary behind Reussdale/Abbey;

Camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora), a large specimen on the front boundary fence in front of Hamilton,

Brush box (Lophostemon confertus) one on front fence to Bridge Rd. in front of Abbey, one closer to Abbey entry off north-east corner,

leaning palm (Washingtonia robusta) on side fence between Hamilton & the Hermitage to the east,

Lord Howe Island palm (Kentia fosteriana) south-west corner of Abbey, predates it.


Trees probably post 1927 (or may be seedling regrowth of earlier trees on site)
Queensland kauri (Agathis robusta), west of Abbey, possibly post 1927 (a species rare in Sydney today)

jacaranda, (J.mimosaefolia), on rear fence behind Reussdale/Abbey

2 Lombardy poplars, (Populus italica 'Nigra'), on west fence north of Reussdale, both cut down to stumps recently.

Hill's weeping fig, (Ficus x hillii) close to front entry to Abbey

Illawarra flame tree (Brachychiton acerifolius) one on front fence north of Abbey, one inside front fence north of Reussdale

bay tree/sweet bay/laurel (Laurus nobilis), north-west of Hamilton, close to house

Lord Howe Island palm (Kentia fosteriana), in same location as bay tree, closer to house.

Oleander (Nerium oleander) south west corner of the Abbey (may predate it, may not)

Wattle (Acacia sp.) south west corner of the Abbey - may predate it - unusual species, near end of lifespan

Cocos Island or Queen palms (Syragus romanzoffianum), many planted between bays of Abbey walls, 3 planted in bitumen paving north of the Abbey towards Bridge Road (S. Read, 4/2004)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Although the building is still structurally sound the interior, especially, is in a very poor state. Unless remedial work is undertaken water damage also threatens the external brickwork. There is a large hole in the main roof which has resulted in major damage to one of the upstairs rooms. Much of the interior plasterwork has also deteriorated beyond repair. Fortunately the building remains capable of rescue, and there have been no major alterations which cannot be easily undone (Perumal Murphy, 1989).
Date condition updated:30 Mar 04
Modifications and dates: 1927 Presbyterian Church demolished 158 Bridge Road (Alma Villa) and moved a (dismantled) church here

? Date unknown - stables/outbuildings behind (south of) Reussdale demolished.

1960s fire in Abbey - damage to roof, ceilings

1977/8 building works included a lowered ceiling, restaurant and function centre, kitchen area in the Abbey (where a restaurant was run until c.2003). Also a bitumen car parking area rear (south) of the Abbey was created, over the former clay tennis court in the south-east corner of the rear of Hamilton/the Abbey. Bitumen sealing of rear of Abbey/Hamilton for carpark, replaced earlier clay tennis court and Hamilton's stables (which may have been long gone by then)

1996 re-roofing (c/iron) of Reussdale, new timber barge boards and front verandah structure.

1989 and 1990 restoration and adaptation, along with later addition works.
1997 and 2000 change of use was proposed for function centre use of Reussdale and the adjacent Bridge Road site.

2004 -8 approvals for restoration and conservation, alterations and additions to the Abbey, demolition of adjacent house Hamilton and town houses on its site and behind (south of) the Abbey. In 2014 a change of use for the Abbey to be a childcare facility was proposed.

2014 -15 approvals given to replace Reussdale's leaky corrugated iron roof with Welsh slate tiles (as it originally had), repair water-damaged kitchen and hallway floors, two bathrooms' faulty membrane, new kitchen floorboards, faulty garage door installation, hallway ceiling. From that time it has been a residential home again.
Current use: function centre
Former use: Aboriginal land, suburban lot, private house, function centre

History

Historical notes: The Leichhardt area was originally inhabited by the Wangal clan of Aborigines. After 1788 diseases such as smallpox and the loss of their hunting grounds caused huge reductions in their numbers and they moved further inland. Since European settlement the foreshores of Blackwattle Bay and Rozelle Bay have developed a unique maritime, industrial and residential character - a character which continues to evolve as areas which were originally residential estates, then industrial areas, are redeveloped for residential units and parklands.

The fist formal grant in the Glebe area was a 400 acre grant to Rev.Richard Johnson, the colony's first chaplain, in 1789. The Glebe (land allocated for the maintenance of a church minister) comprised rolling shale hills covering sandstone, with several sandstone cliff faces. The ridges were drained by several creeks including Blackwattle Creek, Orphan School Creek and Johnston Creek. Extensive swampland surrounded the creeks. On the shale ridges, heavily timbered woodlands contained several varieties of eucalypts while the swamplands and tidal mudflats had mangroves, swamp oaks (Casuarina glauca) and blackwattles (Callicoma serratifolia) after which the bay is named. Blackwattle Swamp was first mentioned by surveyors in the 1790s and Blackwattle Swamp Bay in 1807. By 1840 it was called Blackwattle Bay. Boat parties collected wattles and reeds for the building of huts, and kangaroos and emus were hunted by the early settlers who called the area the Kangaroo Ground. Rozelle Bay is thought to have been named after a schooner which once moored in its waters.

Johnson's land remained largely undeveloped until 1828, when the Church and School Corporation subdivided it into 28 lots, 3 of which they retained for church use (City Plan Heritage, 2005, quoting Max Solling & Peter Reynolds 'Leichhardt: On the Margins of the City', 1997, 14).

The Church sold 27 allotments in 1828 - north on the point and south around Broadway. The Church kept the middle section where the Glebe Estate is now. On the point the sea breezes attracted the wealthy who built villas. The Broadway end attracted slaughterhouses and boiling down works that used the creek draining to Blackwattle Swamp.

Up until the 1970s the Glebe Estate was in the possession of the Church.

On the point the sea breezes attracted the wealthy who built villas. The Broadway end attracted slaughterhouses and boiling down works that used the creek draining to Blackwattle Swamp. Smaller working-class houses were built around these industries. Abbattoirs were built there from the 1860s.

When Glebe was made a municipality in 1859 there were pro and anti-municipal clashes in the streets. From 1850 Glebe was dominated by wealthier interests.

Reclaiming the swamp, Wentworth Park opened in 1882 as a cricket ground and lawn bowls club. Rugby Union was played there in the late 19th century. The dog racing started in 1932. In the early 20th century modest villas were broken up into boarding houses as they were elsewhere in the inner city areas. The wealthier moved into the suburbs which were opening up through the railways. Up until the 1950s Sydney was the location for working class employment - it was a port and industrial city. By the 1960s central Sydney was becoming a corporate city with service-based industries - capital intensive not labour intensive. A shift in demographics occurred, with younger professionals and technical and administrative people servicing the corporate city wanting to live close by. Housing was coming under threat and the heritage conservation movement was starting. The Fish Markets moved in in the 1970s. A influx of students came to Glebe in the 1960s and 1970s. (Dr Lisa Murray, in Central Sydney, 5/8/2009).

Reussdale:
Ferdinand Reuss (1821-96) was the son of a Prussian Consul. He was born in London and studied at German and English universities (Collingwood et al, 2019).

Reuss trained as a civil engineer in the firm of Robert Stevenson, the great lighthouse engineer and grandfather of Robert Louis Stephenson. As a young man he spent some time with the New York-Erie Railway as Resident Engineer until the discovery of gold in Australia attracted him to Victoria in 1851.

He unsuccessfully prospected for gold at Ballarat (ibid, 2019). Reuss soon moved to Sydney and set up as an architect at 134 Pitt Street. He was active as an architect, builder and surveyor in Sydney in the 1870s and 80s.

Reuss speculated in land, subdividing the Cleveland Paddocks (now Prince Alfred Park), Waterloo and the Balmain Estate and published the largest-to-date map of Sydney and environs (ibid, 2019).

By 1863 he was living in Hereford Street, Glebe and in about 1865 he bought two parcels of land on either side of the Pyrmont Bridge Road in the vicinity of Woolley Street: 250 feet on the eastern and 132 feet on the western side.

On these he built cottages, most of which he rented. On the east side he built "The Hermitage" (154 Bridge Road), in which he lived from 1866 until his death in 1896; "Hamilton" (156 Bridge Road), now behind the Presbyterian Church hall and in a derelict state (1972), which he named after Sir William Hamilton, a distant relative; "Alma Villa" (158 Bridge Road), which was demolished by the Presbyterian Church when they re-erected their church here in 1927; and "Reussdale" (160 Bridge Road).

On the other side of Bridge Road Reuss appears to have built the house at no.177, and his family later built "Hamilton Lodge" (also named after Sir William Hamilton) in Woolley Street.

Reussdale was built by 1871 and probably dates to the later 1860s. There were/are no wells on the property, there being one on an adjacent property (De Carlo, E., pers.comm., 2004). Collingwood et al (2019) note it was completed by 1868 in Victorian Gothic (Revival) style. Reussdale was occupied by Ferdinand's daughter Adeline Burgess, newly married to Mr Edward Roland Halloran, later Reuss' business partner and designer of Glebe's Record Reign Hall. A daughter was stillborn at Reussdale while two sons survived. When the house was advertised for rental in 1877, it was stipulated that it not be let to people with small children (ibid, 2019).

Ferdinand Reuss died in a heat wave in 1896 at The Hermitage, his home of 30 years. His estate was administered by his namesake son until 1925 after which everything except The Hermitage was sold to the Presbyterian Church. 'Alma' was demolished, Hamilton became a church hall and Reussdale a manse (ibid, 2019).

1927 Presbyterian Church demolished 158 Bridge Road (Alma Villa) and moved their (dismantled) church here, which had been formerly located on the corner of Glebe Point Road and Parramatta Road.

In the 1960s there were fires in the Abbey building, causing damage to its roof and ceilings.

By the 1960s Reussdale was in disrepair and remained so for decades despite a 1982 permanent conservation order and its 1999 listing on the NSW State Heritage Register (ibid, 2019). It was long allegedly vacant since the 1960s.

In 1977 the De Carlo Brothers purchased the property (in a derelict condition). In 1977/8 building works were undertaken, creating a lowered ceiling, restaurant and function centre, kitchen area in the Abbey (where a restaurant was run until c.2003). Also a bitumen car parking area rear (south) of the Abbey was created, over the former clay tennis court in the south-east corner of the rear of Hamilton/the Abbey.

In 1989 and 1990 restoration and adaptation works were approved and undertaken, along with later addition works.
In 1997 and 2000 a change of use was proposed for function centre use of Reussdale and the adjacent Bridge Road site.

From 2004 to 2008 approvals were granted for restoration and conservation, alterations and additions to the Abbey, demolition of the adjacent house Hamilton and to erect town houses on its site and behind (south of) the Abbey. In 2014 a change of use for the Abbey to be a childcare facility was proposed.

From 2014 to 2015 approvals were given to replace Reussdale's leaky corrugated iron roof with Welsh slate tiles (as it originally had), repair its water-damaged kitchen and hallway floors, two bathrooms' faulty membrane, new kitchen floorboards, faulty garage door installation, hallway ceiling. From that time it has been a residential home again.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Worker's Dwellings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Architectural design-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian picturesque Gothic-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Presbyterianism-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Ferdinand Reuss, builder and speculator-

Recommended management:

The original building should be reconstructed retaining as much as possible of the original fabric. The rear sections have some interest as such abut their retention is not essential. A photographic record should be sufficient. If possible care should be taken not to disturb the stone foundations below. If the additions are demolished it would be worth having an historical archaeologist inspect the foundations. Any major extensions to the building should be to the rear and visually separate. There would be no need for such additions to imitate the form or detailing of the building. This would be provided the building was low in scale (no more than one storey). A large flat roof would probably be preferable to an imitative, steep pitched form. Such a roof would threaten to dominate the original. Similarly excessive decoration could also conflict. A simple rendered wall along the Hewit Avenue boundary would be preferable, painted a sympathetic colour. It is important that the front garden area remain unbuilt upon. Some attempt should be made to recreate a period front garden retaining existing mature trees where appropriate. It is recommended that a qualified landscape designer be appointed. Attention should also be given to the front fence and signage. There is no objection to driveways and unroofed parking spaces in the front, provided they are carefully screened and properly treated. (Perumal Murphy 1989)

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage RegisterSHR Listing0029202 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0029218 Jan 85 190265
Local Environmental Plan  15 Jun 84   
Local Environmental PlanLocal Environmental Plan 2000B45 G22 Dec 00 168 
Register of the National Estate 166021 Oct 80   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Leichhardt Heritage Study B45G(not stated)  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAMAC2008156-160 Bridge Road, Glebe : Archaeological assessment,research design, methodology, and excavation permit application [Variant title:Reussdale, The Abbey and Hamilton]
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Preservation Heritage Walk View detail
WrittenCollingwood, Lyn; Crawshaw, Peter and Hannan, Robert2019Villas - Glebe & Forest Lodge, pre-1870 View detail
WrittenGarry Stanley and Dickson Rothschild2008Photographic archival recording Reussdale 160 Bridge Road, Glebe
WrittenGarry Stanley Heritage Architect; Dickson Rothschild2008Addendum to the Conservation Management Plan 'The Abbey Site', 154-160 Bridge Rd., Glebe
WrittenGodden Mackay Logan2005Conservation Management Plan - Reussdale
WrittenPerumal Murphy P/L Environmental Planners1989Reussdale a conservation plan
WrittenSmith, K. & B.1989The architectural character of Glebe, Sydney
TourismSydney City Council2007Preservation Heritage Walk View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045056
File number: EF14/5533; S90/3984; HC 32727


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