Ingleholme & Garage | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Ingleholme & Garage

Item details

Name of item: Ingleholme & Garage
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.7282423145 Long: 151.1366883130
Primary address: 17 Boomerang Street, Turramurra, NSW 2074
Parish: Gordon
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Ku-Ring-Gai
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP259871
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
17 Boomerang StreetTurramurraKu-Ring-GaiGordonCumberlandPrimary Address
17 Boomerang StreetTurramurraKu-Ring-GaiGordonCumberlandDuplicate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private19 Mar 99

Description

Designer/Maker: Sir John Sulman
Construction years: 1895-1896
Physical description: Site and House:
In 1895,seven acres on Ku-Ring-Gai Chase Road (now Bobbin Head Road).

Garden:
The grounds comprised two acres of garden, lawn and orchard and five acres of good paddocks with good views. The garden was laid out formally with spacious lawns, clipped hedges, topiary, a vine walk, a kitchen garden, drying ground, fowl yards, paddocks and a small lucerne patch (Edwards, 2009, 1-2).

A row of six Bhutan cypresses (Cupressus torulosa) provide privacy and wind protection from the street (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 8/5/2015).

Buildings:
House:
Soon after a cottage was built, named Ingleholme. It was in a continual state of flux from the time Sulman bought itf. He extended it several times, major phases coinciding with the birth of his children: 1894, 1896, 1899 and 1906. The building occupied a floor space of 650 square feet (208 sp.m.) and comprised a drawing room, dining room, large music room, nine bedrooms, a playroom, two bathrooms, kitchen pantry, storeroom, two box rooms, extensive stabling with asphalted and covered yards, two mens' rooms and outbuildings including workshop, cycle and gardener's shops, rubbish destructor and a 'good gymnasium'. It was replete with up-to-date home conveniences, water, gas and drainage by a perfectly acting septic tank.

The house is of dark brown brick trimmed with red brick. A series of pitched and hipped roofs are covered with Marseilles tiles from which emanate towers, corbelled chimneys and gables. Sulman used cavity walls in areas exposed to weather and sold walls everywhere else. The deep porch is configured in such a way as to provide more than adequate shelter to visitors from inclement weather. French doors, retractable awnings, louvers and flap shutters kept the rooms cool during summers.

The playroom extension was distinctive because of its size, designed to serve recreation needs of seven children. It was a 'fine large room' equipped with hung shutters. A glazed bay window above a dais let in natural light. Adjoining this was a large recessed hearth for a log fire with an iron canopy. According to Sulman the playroom was "...a source of wonder to the people of the district as there was nothing like it anywhere in the neighbourhood especially to the R.C.orchardists of the vicinity some of whom could hardly be persuaded it was not to be used as a Protestant Chapel, in which case it was intimated it would not last long and might be found in ashes any fine morning. In addition to the fireplace turret there was also a ventilator on the roof which could easily be mistaken for a bell cot. But when it began to be used for its legitimate purpose the fears of the R.C. died down and they even attended an election meeting for Charles Wade when he ran for Parliament." (Sulman, 'The Story of Ingleholme', 12/1927, Sulman Papers, ML MSS4480).

Red brick accented by white trimmed windows are in the Queen Anne style. Old English vernacular is represented in the use of half-timbered gables and in the oriel windows. The expansive roof extends down onto the verandah. French doors from the principal rooms open out onto the verandah and thence onto the garden. The influence of Kerr and Stevenson may be seen in the configuration of the main spaces and principal rooms. The drawing room features Adam detailing and an inglenook, a distinctive and ubiquitous feature of Sulman's domestic designs; it is the basis of the name 'Ingleholme'.

The dining room features cedar-panelled walls (Edwards, 2009, 1-2).
Date condition updated:31 Jul 15
Modifications and dates: Ingleholme was in a continual state of flux from the time John Sulman bought it (ostensibly for a home for his parents) and decided to move in himself. He extended it several times as his family grew, major phases of development coinciding with the birth of his children: Geoffrey in 1894, Joan in 1896, Thomas in 1899 and John in 1906.

The playroom extension was distinctive because of its size, designed by Sulman to serve the recreation needs of his seven children.
Current use: residence
Former use: residence

History

Historical notes: Turramurra:
Turramurra is 170 metres above sea level, 30 metres above Pymble and 17 kilometres from Sydney. It has an average of 1,400 mm of rain per annum, one of the highest for the Sydney metro area. It has a population of close to 11,000 and an area of 6.13 sq km or approx 2 sq miles. It is bordered on one end by the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park and on the other by Lane Cove National Park.

Originally a timber-getting area, European settlement begun in 1822 until after 1850 when orchardists came to occupy extensive landholdings producing a variety of citrus and other fruits including persimmons, custard apples and Chinese pears.

The Turramurra Railway station was opened on 1 January 1890. The suburb was then known as Eastern Road and it was nearly a year later on 14 December 1890 that Turramurra was named after the Aboriginal word meaning 'high hill'.

The railway brought immediate progress. In 1881 the population was only 142, by 1891 it was 788 and in 1901 1,306.

There was no electricity until 1927, water was piped from Wahroonga Reservoir and the outside loos were regularly emptied by the nightwatchman. The gaslights were lit each evening by the gaslighter. Those with very large properties kept cows for instant milk supply. Many dairies were established and the milkman delivered twice a day. By 1920 fruit fly put an end to all commercial growing of fruit on the North Shore and the land were converted into Chinese gardens (Edwards, 2009, 1-2).

Bobbin Head Road:
Bobbin Head Road (formerly Ku-Ring-Gai Chase Road) is said to be an Aboriginal word for 'a smoky place', or, named after a rock resembling a head bobbing in water when the tide comes in, or, said to be the name of a farm owned by one 'Hutchinson'. 'Ku-Ring-Gai' is the modified version of the name of the Aboriginal tribe (Guringai) that dwelt in the region. The word was first used by Europeans in the naming of Ku-Ring-Gai Chase National Park. Boomerang Street is from an Aboriginal word for 'weapon for throwing when hunting'.

Ku-Ring-Gai Avenue:
The most expensive subdivision, with lots of 10 acres or more available, is the portion around Ku-ring-gai Avenue and Boomerang Street and a number of houses listed in the Sands Directory of 1903 are found here. Chinese gardens in the area disappeared after WWII. Ku-ring-gai Avenue was owned by a few prominent people, including:

2 - Ellerslie 1899 - John Shedden Adam
8 - Mildura 1899 - Slatyer and Cosh
12 - Ballydown 1897 - Charles Slatyer - Martin McIlrath (second owner of Ingleholme)
17 - Glensloy, Wychwood 1901 - Robertson and Marks - G. E. McFarlane (tobacco merchant) Originally on a 9-acre site
25 - Yacaba 1897 - Walter Vindin (solicitor)
31 - Creighton, Cainga, Tanvally 1899 - Thomas Cosh
34 - Newstead, Yprina 1903 (Lichtner, chemist and importer)
37 Ilanscourt 1897 - Nixon and Allen - W. J. Baker (Cutler and Instrument maker)
43 Sylvan Fels, Cossington 1899 - Nixon and Allen - Grace Cossington Smith gave drawing and painting lessons.
44 - Waiwera 1900 - additions by Spain and Cosh (Sir Joseph Palmer Abbott)
Woodstock 1905 - Spain and Cosh - W. C. Penfold
51 - Highfield 1917
54 - Erahor, Cairns 1900 - Spain and Cosh (Thomas Cosh) - Dr Cosh and later J. P Dowling
55 - Hampton 1900 - Alex Joske
56 - Strathendrick 1899 - Spain and Cosh - Mr Ward rented from Cosh
60 - The Terricks 1908 - Spain and Cosh, (Thomas Cosh)
62 - Egelabra 1908 - Spain and Cosh (Thomas Cosh)
77 - Talagon 1897 - Arthur Stanton Cook

Boomerang Avenue
2 - Sunny Law 1912 - Spain Cosh and Dodds, W. Dougall
6 - Clavally 1895-1900 - E. J. McCulloch (solicitor)
17 - Ingleholme 1896 - John Sulman (Edwards, 2009).

In 1895 John Sulman purchased seven acres on Ku-Ring-Gai Chase Road (now Bobbin Head Road) on which to build a house for his parents. He mapped out the road that was to be built to gain access to the site. When the cottage was nearing completion, however, his parents had a change of heart, deciding that the location was too secluded for them and 'very dull'. In view of this Sulman bought another property nearby, right on Lane Cove Road (now the Pacific Highway) just across the road from Womerah Avenue. It was there that he built his parents' home. They moved to their new house in 1896 and named it Addiscombe after the village in Croydon on the outskirts of London where they had lived before emigrating to Australia.

Sulman decided to move in to the first home and convert it to his family home and named it Ingleholme. The house was in a continual state of flux from the time Sulman decided to move in. He extended it several times as his family grew, major phases of development coinciding with the birth of his children: Geoffrey in 1894, Joan in 1896, Thomas in 1899 and John in 1906. The building he designed occupied a floor space of 650 square feet (208 sp.m.) and comprised a drawing room, dining room, large music room, nine bedrooms, a playroom, two bathrooms, kitchen pantry, storeroom, two box rooms, extensive stabling with asphalted and covered yards, two mens' rooms and outbuildings including workshop, cycle and gardener's shops, rubbish destructor and a 'good gymnasium'. It was replete with up-to-date home conveniences, water, gas and drainage by a perfectly acting septic tank. The grounds comprised two acres of garden, lawn and orchard and five acres of good paddocks with good views. The garden was laid out formally with spacious lawns, clipped hedges, topiary, a vine walk, a kitchen garden, drying ground, fowl yards, paddocks and a small lucerne patch.

The house is built of dark brown brick trimmed with red brick. A series of pitched and hipped roofs are covered with Marseilles tiles from which emanate towers, corbelled chimneys and gables. Sulman used cavity walls in areas exposed to weather and sold walls everywhere else. The deep porch is configured in such a way as to provide more than adequate shelter to visitors from inclement weather. French doors, retractable awnings, louvers and flap shutters kept the rooms cool during summers.

The playroom extension was distinctive because of its size, designed by Sulman to serve the recreation needs of his seven children. It was a 'fine large room' equipped with hung shutters. A glazed bay window above a dais let in natural light. Adjoining this was a large recessed hearth for a log fire with an iron canopy. According to Sulman the playroom was "...a source of wonder to the people of the district as there was nothing like it anywhere in the neighbourhood especially to the R.C.orchardists of the vicinity some of whom could hardly be persuaded it was not to be used as a Protestant Chapel, in which case it was intimated it would not last long and might be found in ashes any fine morning. In addition to the fireplace turret there was also a ventilator on the roof which could easily be mistaken for a bell cot. But when it began to be used for its legitimate purpose the fears of the R.C. died down and they even attended an election meeting for Charles Wade when he ran for Parliament." (Sulman, 'The Story of Ingleholme', 12/1927, Sulman Papers, ML MSS4480).

Red brick accented by white trimmed windows are in the Queen Anne style. Old English vernacular is represented in the use of half-timbered gables and in the oriel windows. The expansive roof extends down onto the verandah. French doors from the principal rooms open out onto the verandah and thence onto the garden. The influence of Kerr and Stevenson may be seen in the configuration of the main spaces and principal rooms. The drawing room features Adam detailing and an inglenook, a distinctive and ubiquitous feature of Sulman's domestic designs; it is the basis of the name 'Ingleholme'.

The dining room features cedar-panelled walls (Edwards, 2009, 1-2).

The Sulmans lived at Ingleholme until October 1910 when it became 'necessary to find a cooler climate' and alleviate Geoffrey's predisposition to digestive problems during the summer months and Annie's 'rheumatism in the hands owing to living on clay soil and shale subsoil'. They rented lodgings at Katoomba, Wentworth Falls and Medlow Bath in the Blue Mountains before moving to Kihilla at Lawson. Kihilla remained in the ownership of the Sulman family until it was sold in 1953. The Sulman home in Sydney was at Burrangong in Warung (Warrung) Street, McMahons Point (Edwards, 11/2009 pers.comm.).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Sir John Sulman, architect and town planner-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act See File For Schedule. Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1): (1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material.
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning and tree surgery, weed control (but not extensive lopping), and the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls.
Jan 11 2002
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0007102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0007123 Jan 81 190477
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenEdwards, Dr.Zeny2009Grand Homes of the North Shore - a tour conducted by Zeny Edwards for the NSW Historic Houses Trust

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045077
File number: S90/06269 & HC 32004


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