Eveleigh Railway Workshops | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Eveleigh Railway Workshops

Item details

Name of item: Eveleigh Railway Workshops
Other name/s: Eveleigh Railway Yards, Eveleigh Precinct, Australian Technology Park; Carriageworks; North Eveleigh; Macdonaldtown Gasworks; Macdonaldtown Triangle
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Workshop
Location: Lat: -33.8945274473 Long: 151.1956660200
Primary address: Great Southern and Western Railway, Redfern, NSW 2016
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT52 DP1001467
LOT10 DP1136859
LOT12 DP1136859
LOT8 DP1136859
LOT9 DP1136859
LOT1 DP1175706
LOT2 DP1175706
LOT3 DP1175706
LOT4 DP1175706
LOT4001 DP1194309
LOT4002 DP1194309
LOT4003 DP1194309
LOT4004 DP1194309
LOT4005 DP1194309
LOT4006 DP1194309
LOT4007 DP1194309

Boundary:

The listing boundary is formed by Wilson St to the north west, Redfern Station to the north east, Cornwallis and Garden Sreets to the south east and the property boundary to the new development fronting Henderson Rd to the south.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Wilson StreetEveleighSydney   
Eveleigh WorkshopsEveleighSydney   
Great Southern and Western RailwayRedfernSydney  Primary Address
Cornwallis StreetRedfernSydney  Alternate Address
Burren StreetRedfernSydney  Alternate Address
Eveleigh StreetRedfernSydney  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government20 Jan 99

Statement of significance:

The Eveleigh Railway Yards are some of the finest historic railway engineering workshops in the world and Eveleigh contains one of the most complete late 19th century and early 20th century forge installations, collection of cranes and power systems, in particular the hydraulic system. The place is of international significance and is one of Australia's finest industrial heritage items. The value of the place is increased by the fact that it is comprised of assemblages, collections and operational systems rather than individual items. Conversely, the significance has been reduced by its closure, relocation of some machinery and its disassociation from the operating rail network. (State Projects 1995: 109)
Date significance updated: 12 Feb 99
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: George Cowdery
Builder/Maker: George Fishburn
Construction years: 1882-1897
Physical description: The Eveleigh Precinct is located approximately four kilometres south of the Sydney GPO and is bounded by the inner city suburbs of Darlington, Redfern, Alexandria Park, Erskinville and Newtown. The total area of the precinct, which runs from Redfern Station in the northeast to Erskinville and MacDonaldtown Stations in the southwest, is approximately 51 hectares. It is located across the main railway corridor to Sydney Central Station.

Most of the southern portion of the overall site has been declared surplus to railway needs and much of this area has been cleared and was used as a parking area for Paddy's Markets while they were occupying the Locomotive Workshop. Other portions of the southern precinct have been redeveloped for public housing. Several former railway buildings stand vacant. (Schwager Brooks 1994:1)

THE LOCOMOTIVE WORKSHOP
- The external walls are of sandstock brickwork laid in English bond with arched window and door openings picked out in white bricks. The pediments have circular vents filled with louvres. The brickwork is modulated into bays forming piers which strengthen the walls.

Externally, brick walls feature sandstone cornices, parapets, sills and base courses. The stone generally extends the full depth of the wall. The top face of the parapets (and cornices) are splayed to fall to the outside to discharge water and they are joined on the top face by cast iron toggles, about one inch thick. On the pedimented areas roof flashings are recessed in a trench in the stone.

The walls and internal columns are supported on massed brick footings. In bays 1-4 there are brick arches between piers and each pier is supported on a timber platform and timber piles, 12 in each corner and 6 at each column.

Inside the building is a grid of round, hollow cast iron columns moulded in a classical style supported on footings. The columns support the crane girders and the roof.

The corrugated iron clad roof is supported by fine wrought iron trusses with diagonal wind bracing which fixes through the walls at each end. The purlins are wrought iron 'Z's . Timber purlins have been added in some places for ease of fixing replacement roofing. Monitor roofs run the length of the bays with a curved roof supported on curved wrought iron rafters.

Along the south side of the building are a series of annexes of varying dates of construction.

Along the south of the building are two sets of tracks and several associated turntables. To the east in the space between the Loco Shop and the new Loco Shed a track lays parallel to the building, sections of which are now exposed. (State Projects 1995: 60-65)

CARRIAGE WORKSHOPS
- The construction of these workshops are essentially the same as the Locomotive Workshops.

PAINT SHOP - A large single storey building containing 8 roads in the brick section and 5 roads in the adjacent metal clad section. Each road is separated by a single row of cast iron columns which support the saw tooth south light roof.

TURNTABLE & TRACKWORK - This is located west of the Large Erecting Shop.

AIR RAID SHELTERS - These are scattered along the existing rail corridor, generally located along embankments or cuttings.

There are numerous collections of machinery within the buildings on the site, including equipment adjacent to the Locomotive Workshops and machinery inside the buildings. (Schwager Brooks 1994: 20-21)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Archaeological Potential - Medium-High
Physical Condition - Fair
Date condition updated:07 May 14
Modifications and dates: 1899 - Large Erecting Shop added to the site.
1901 - By this year the new foundry and laundry had been constructed.
1902 - Most overhead cranes in workshops converted to electric drives.
- A new copper and tinsmiths shop erected.
1907 - The New Locomotive Shop designed and constructed.
- A new compressor house constructed.
1914 - Electrification of machinery in the workshops.
- New Locomotive Shop extended to the south.
1917 - Resumption of adjacent houses to the south for the Alexandria Goods Yard.
- Several new buildings completed, leading to a rearrangement of the workshops.
1925 - Northmost bay of Running Shed demolished.
1965 - Southern and middle bay of Running Shed demolished.
1970s - Workshops rearranged internally to update the works and the Spring Shop was removed.
(State Projects 1995:28 - 34)
c1980s - concrete Taj Mahal structure on south side of Eveleigh Rail Yards travelling west - removed at unknown date.

2008 - AIA Architecture Award for the adaptive reuse of CarriageWorks at Eveleigh: Tonkin Zulaikha Greer
... an exciting addition to the cultural life of Sydney and its artists. It provides an environment of unique creativity and innovation; a new home for physical theatre, spoken word, music, dance, visual and hybrid arts. The site is close to the city but difficult to access and being below road level not easy to identify. This has been resolved by the simple gesture of creating a small plaza at street level and celebrating it with a new public marker made of recycled trusses from the building. The project is essentially an exercise in adaptive reuse: the design reveals and celebrates the industrial heritage of the site. The strength of the design comes from the directness of its response to the old buildings, respecting their structural grid as an ordering device and inserting simple strong new forms as a counterpoint to the intricacies of the old. The foyer delivers a remarkable new public space, animated and activated by the revealed heritage items. Located in the Redfern-Waterloo precinct, CarriageWorks sets a precedent for the remaining development of the site, for heritage values to be respected and to inform the design of new interventions.(AIA, www.architecture.com.au/i-cms?page=11388)

AIA (Heritage) Greenway Award goven to CarriageWorks at Eveleigh: Tonkin Zulaikha Greer
The Eveleigh Carriage Workshops are of national cultural significance as part of the largest intact, high quality workshop site from the steam era in Australia. It has now been opened to the public in a creative new way. This landmark site has been given new life without forsaking the old - its 1888 industrial heritage clearly evident through the retention of nearly all the significant fabric and equipment extant at the time of adaptation. The carriages have gone, but not the cranes, the rails and the ability to read its form and former function. Existing elements retain their patina of age. This project, realised on a strict budget and even stricter timetable, provides flexible theatre spaces, administration offices, workshop spaces and amenities in discrete concrete boxes clearly articulated from the heritage fabric.
The success of the project stems from its simplicity and the quality of design and detailing in the new work. The spaces created by the new theatre boxes has enriched the interior rather than detracted from it. The complexity of the frame, the structure and the industrial artefacts are powerful. This is a confident design approach that does not diminish that significance.
While sections of the building have been altered, these are minor in terms of the scale of the overall conservation exercise and accessibility this project brings. The desire to successfully adapt buildings is often not matched by the design. Here at Eveleigh the evidence is concrete. (AIA, www.architecture.com.au/i-cms?page=11388)
Current use: Public housing, Australian Technology Park and temporary uses.
Former use: Railway workshops and yards

History

Historical notes: Redfern's natural landscape was defined by sand hills and swamps. The Carrahdigang, more widely known as the Cadigal people, valued the area for its abundant supply of food.

The name Redfern originates from an early land grant to William Redfern in 1817. It was previously known as Roberts Farm and Boxley's Swamp. (Murray, 2009, 5). William Redfern (1774?-1833) was a surgeon's mate in the Royal Navy and was aboard HMS Standard when its crew took part in the revolt in 1797 known as the Mutiny of the Nore. Because he had advised the men to be more united, he was included among leaders who were court-martialled. Although sentenced to death, he was reprieved because of his youth and in 1801 arrived in Sydney as a convict. He served on Norfolk Island as an assistant surgeon. In 1803 he was pardoned, but remained on the island until 1808, when he returned to Sydney and was appointed assistant surgeon after being examined in medicine and surgery by Surgeons Jamison, Harris and Bohan. In 1816 he took charge of the new Sydney Hospital, but maintained a private practice. In 1814 he reported on conditions on convict transport ships and his recommendation that all have a surgeon on board whose duties were to superintend the health of convicts was put into practice.

He resigned from Government service in 1819 when not appointed to succeed D'Arcy Wentworth as principal surgeon. Despite his valuable service, many were contemptuous of him as he was an emancipist, although he had the friendship of Governor Macquarie. In 1818 Redfern received a grant of 1300 acres in Airds (in today's Campbelltown area) and later received more land in the area and by his death in 1823 he owned, by grant and purchase, over 23,000 acres in NSW. In 1817 he had been granted 100 acres in the area of the present suburb of Redfern. The boundaries were approximately the present-day Cleveland, Regent, Redfern and Elizabeth Streets. The commodious home Redfern built on his land was considered to be a country house, surrounded by flower and kitchen gardens. His neighbours were John Baptist (at the 40 acre Darling Nursery in today's Chippendale) and Captain Cleveland, an officer of the 73rd regiment, remembered by today's street of that name, and before its demolition, by Cleveland House, his home (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 219-220).

The passing of the Sydney Slaughterhouses Act in 1849 brought other businesses to the district. This act banned abattoirs and noxious trades from the city. Tanners, wool scourers and wool-washers, fellmongers, boiling down works and abattoirs had 10 years to move their businesses outside city boundaries. Many of the trades moved to Redfern and Waterloo - attracted by the water. The sand hills still existed but by the late 1850s Redfern was a flourishing suburb housing 6500 people.

The Municipalities Act of 1858 gave districts the option of municipal incorporation. Public meetings were held and after a flurry of petitions Redfern Municipality was proclaimed on August 11, 1859, the fourth in Sydney to be formed under the Act. Redfern Town Hall opened in 1870 and the Albert Cricket Ground in 1864. Redfern Post Office came in 1882.

The majority of houses in Redfern in the 1850s were of timber. From the 1850s market gardeners congregated in Alexandria south of McEvoy Street, around Shea's Creek and Bourke Road (Murray, 2009, 5).

When Sydney's original railway terminus was built in the Cleveland Paddocks, which extended from Devonshire and Cleveland Streets to Chippendale, the station's name was chosen to honour William Redfern. The station was built of iron and the first stationmaster was a Mr Fielding. In 1874 the station was replaced by a brick and stone structure, covering two platforms. At that time the present Redfern station was known as Eveleigh, after a lovely old home standing on the western side of the railway line.

When Central Station was built, on the site of the Devonshire Street cemetery, the name of Eveleigh Station was changed to Redfern. The name Eveleigh was retained for the huge railway workshops, just beyond the station, on the site of the original Hutchinson Estate.

All that remains of the Cleveland Paddocks is Prince Alfred Park, where the exhibition building was erected in 1870 for an inter-colonial exhibition opened by Governor Belmore, after whom Belmore Park was named, on 30/8/1870.

Redfern was the scene of the maiden trip of the first double-decker tram in 1879. It travelled between the old Redfern station to the corner of Hunter and Elizabeth Streets in the city (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 220).

In 1885 the Sands Sydney Directory listed 54 market gardens. While many were worked by European-Australians, by the 1870s Chinese market gardeners had acquired leases in the district and a decade later were dominating the trade.

The Eveleigh complex in 1886 became one of the largest employers in the state. Redfern was an industrial working class suburb by the end of the 19th century. Reschs brewery and other factories attracted migrants. The Syrian/Lebanese community began settling around Redfern and Surry Hills by the 1880s (Murray, 2009, 5).

Redfern at the end of the 19th century was characterised by its many gardens, but at the turn of the century industry was taking over the area. At that time, many businessmen in the area were from Syria, such as George Dan, who established his business in 1890; Stanton and Aziz Melick, in 1888; and Anthony & Simon Coorey, in the 1890s. Like other inner-city suburbs, the area still has a high migrant population, including many now from Lebanon, as well as a large Aboriginal population. There is still industry in the area among the high density residential occupation (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 220).

In the 1940s 73 per cent of all industrial activity in Sydney was concentrated within a radius of 3.5 miles from Redfern Station.

Many of its services have disappeared or been substantially downgraded over the last couple of decades, even though Redfern is still a densely populated inner city suburb (Murray, 2009, 5).
Eveleigh Railway Workshops:

When John Whitton first conceived the idea of the Eveleigh Railway Workshops, they were to undertake the construction of the infrastructure of the railways including the safe working systems and some of the perway systems. However, their main tasks were the maintenance and repair of locomotives and railway stock and the manufacture of rolling stock such as wagons and passenger carriages. At the time there were no other facilities in NSW for the construction of locomotives.

The workshops were set up on both the north and the south sides of the main western and southern railway lines, which led to a duplication of some workshop functions, but the really heavy work such as forging and casting of ferrous and non-ferrous metal, was to be carried out on the locomotive side. When the workshops were established most of the rolling stock had a wooden chassis, so the separation of services was not a major impediment to production.

The site for the Eveleigh railway yards was chosen in 1875, resumed in 1878 and the compensation price settled in 1880. Approximately 100 000 pounds was paid for 64.5 acres of land. Clearance began two years later. Much work went into the design and construction of the buildings because of the sandy nature of the soil. In the meantime, Eveleigh Station had been opened in 1878. In 1906 it was renamed Redfern Station. The former Redfern Station was renamed Sydney Terminal (Central).

The Engine Running Shed, now demolished, was the first building completed. Cowdery was criticised for the extravagance of this building. It comprised three segmental arched bays, each covering seven 'roads' without intervening columns.

George Fishburn was awarded the contract for bays 1-4 of the Locomotive Workshops in 1884 and work was commenced soon after. They were officially opened in 1887. Workshops 5-15 were opened later in the year. This initial building phase also included the construction of bays 16-25 of the Carriage Sheds, the Paint Shop, a General Store and various smaller buildings and the associated turntables, traversers and rail lines. Development continued into the 1890s. The workshops were open every day of the week until 1892 when union negotiations led to the workshops being closed on Saturdays.

The residential development of the area proceeded in the 1870s and 1880s around the railway workshop and was stimulated by the need for housing generated by the workshops. The names of many early settlers are continued in the street names in the area, including Eveleigh, and many of the property boundaries and former watercourses are reflected in street patterns. At the time of the development of the railway workshops, Darlington School was also built, as were other municiple buildings since demolished for the university.

For some time Eveleigh had its own gas works which were located near MacDonaldtown Station. However, in 1901 with the establishment of Ultimo Power Station which belonged to the Rail and Tramway Department, electric power was made available to the workshops. Shortly after work commenced on the conversion of the rope-driven cranes to electric motor drives. Work also commenced on the replacement of the steam engines at the south end of the workshops by powerful electric motors. This, however, was not completed until 1914.

In 1907 the Commissioners for Railways decided to begin the manufacture of new locomotives at Eveleigh and the New Locomotive Shop was designed and constructed for this purpose.

A Public Works Annual Report in 1915 concluded that the Eveleigh Works were too congested and recommended the establishment of a new locomotive and repairing works. Adding to this situation, strained conditions led to eight strikes at Eveleigh between July 1915 and July 1917. In 1916 James Fraser, Acting Chief Commissioner, addressed workers at Eveleigh on the introduction of the Taylor card system. The introduction of this system on 2 August 1917 led to an 82 day general strike. It began when 1100 men struck at Randwick Tramway Depot and 3000 at Eveleigh. Volunteers kept trains running including boys from Newington and S.C.E.G.S. (Shaw) private schools at Eveleigh.

This all took place during the First World War which brought worse conditions and declining wages.

The rail yards continued to develop. Additional land was resumed to the south-west and 230 houses were demolished to allow for the construction of the Alexandria Goods Yard sometime around 1917.

During 1925 the manufacture of new locomotives ceased.

As a result of World War 2 (1939-45), bays 5-6 were cleared of machinery in 1940 and plans drawn up for the installation of equipment supplied by the Department of Defence for the manufacture of 25lb field gun-shells. A mezzanine floor was added to Bay 5 in 1941 and the machinery for shell manufacture installed by February. Bay 8 was altered for an ammunitions annex. By 1943 Bay 8 had been abandoned by the Department of Defence as it had organised its own factories. Production of the shells ceased in 1945 and the construction of new locomotives was reintroduced. This post-war locomotive manufacturing lasted until 1952 when Eveleigh once again became a repair and maintenance facility. The decision to abandon steam locomotives in 1963 meant that Eveleigh, which was dedicated to steam locomotive maintenance and repair, entered its final phase.

The yards continued to grow and expand, and functions were continually changing. In later years workshops at Chullora in 1937 and later Clyde took over aspects of work formerly performed at Eveleigh and functions were rearranged accordingly.

Re-organisation and attempts at modernisation in the 1970s came too late. Too much of the machinery was suited only to the steam locomotive era. Buildings containing old equipment, machinery which had become progressively inappropriate to a modern transport era, and a changing work culture, has seen the yards decline gradually in the late 20th century until its closure in 1988. After closure, bays 5-15 were used by Paddy's Markets while other buildings on the site were demolished over an extended period. These included the Pattern Shed, Foundry, Smith's Shops and the Wheelpress Shop. In 1991 the NSW Government announced the creation of a technology park at Eveleigh in association with the University of NSW, the University of Sydney and the University of Technology. Decontamination works were carried out to cleared areas of the site progressively.

In 1994 Paddy's Markets returned to Haymarket. City West Development Corporation took ownership of the Locomotive Workshops, bays 1-15, in addition to the New Locomotive Shed and the Manager's Office.

In 1995 philanthropist and conservationist Caroline Simpson (nee Fairfax) OAM funded publication of an account of Sydney's Eveleigh Railway Workshops (McGuiness, 2003).

Today the functions fomerly carried out at Eveleigh are no longer carried out by government enterprises or no longer carried out in Australia (State Projects 1995:19-22, 27-33, 43-51).

In 2017 the volunteer group 3801 Limited, which takes its name from the 3801 locomotive steam train, who have for a 30 year period used the Limited Large Erecting Shed at Eveleigh to restore and maintain heritage diesel carriages and locomotives that take tourists and enthusiasts on rail adventures, was locked out of its workshop. Transport for NSW took over the shed after a review determined the 3801 group must clear out to share the space with other heritage operators. A Transport for NSW spokesman said the department had offered assistance to find an alternative site for 3801 Limited (Graham, 2017, 5).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Engineering the public railway system-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour (none)-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Involvement with the Second World War-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and administering rail networks-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Whitton, Chief Engineer, NSW Government Railways-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Caroline Simpson (nee Fairfax) OAM, philanthropist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with George Cowdery, railways architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with George Fishburn, builder-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
*The workshops were an important part of the NSW rail network which was instrumental in the development of the state during the 19th and 20th century.
*The construction of the workshops influenced the development of the local area (which was developed for worker's housing) both by providing employment and by its bulk and presence, starting bells and sirens.
*The yards were associated with developments in working conditions now crucial to the Australian cultural identity, eg) the weekend. The yards had an important association with the labour movement. The place was seen initially as a positive instrument of state socialism and in later periods as the site of important labour actions and of restrictive work practices.
*They were conceived by Whitton, the 'father' of the NSW railways, and were an integral part of his NSW rail system, and were executed in detail by Cowdery
(State Projects 1995:109)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
*The entire complex has a strong industrial character generated by the rail network itself, by the large horizontal scale of the buildings, the consistent use of brick and corrugated iron, the repetitive shapes of roof elements and of details such as doors and windows and because of the uniform grey colours.
*The simple, strong functional forms of the buildings have landmark quality, not only as important townscape elements in the Redfern/Eveleigh area, but as part of the visual train journey of thousands of commuters, marking arrival in the city centre.
*The major buildings from the original 19th century development of the site are well designed, detailed and built exhibiting a high degree of unity of design, detailing and materials.
(State Projects 1995:109)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
*The Workshops were one of the largest employers in Sydney at the turn of the century, declining only in the latter half of the 20th century. It was and is an important source of pride and in demonstrating the capacity of Australian industry and workers and a high level of craft skills.
*The place is significant to railway workers, former railway workers and railway unions and is associated with the stories of many, including workers and locals, which are important to cultural identity.
*Although no longer operating as a workshop, the place maintains symbolic value for the community as a former workplace and a place that provided economic input into the local area.
*It has strong symbolic ties with existing trade unions. (State Projects 1995: 106-111)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
*The Eveleigh railway workshops have considerable research potential for understanding the operation of railway workshops. This potential is enhanced by the extent of archival material available and because the relatively recent closure means that there are many former workshop workers who are still alive and who know how the place operated.
*They have unique educational value enhanced by the highly valuable location and the relationship with the ATP and the three universities. They contain the potential to achieve an understanding of the work practices of today through an understanding of the cultural continuity between 19th century technology and 21st century technology.
*There is potential for further research to yield information about the labour movement, labour relations and the nature of work practices in the 19th and 20th centuries.
*Archaeological remains have the potential to reveal further information about the operation of the Yards. (State projects 1995: 109)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The size and quality of the site is rare. (State Projects 1995: 107)
Integrity/Intactness: *The Eveleigh Locomotive Workshops are the largest surviving, intact railway workshops dating from the steam era in Australia, and possibly the world. (State Projects 1995: 110)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Conservation management should be pursued as an active, day-to-day responsibility. (State Projects 1995: 133)

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementConsolidated CMP for endorsement - Eveleigh Railway Workshops/ North Eveleigh West  
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementEveleigh Carriageworks CMP CMP conditionally endorsed by Heritage Council 27 June 2003. Jun 27 2003
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCMP submitted by Australian Technology Park. CMP prepared by Godden Mackay Logan, March 2012. Oct 17 2012
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementAustralian Technology Park. Revised draft CMP submitted for endorsement. Jan 14 2014
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementAustralian Technology Park. Final CPM submitted for endorsement. Mar 20 2014
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977
ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) TO GRANT SITE-SPECIFIC EXEMPTIONS FROM APPROVAL
Eveleigh Railway Workshops
SHR No. 01140

I, the Minister for Heritage, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, do, by this my order, revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 13 March 2015; and grant an exemption from section 57(1) of that Act in respect of the engaging in or carrying out of any activities described in Schedule C by the owner described in Schedule B on the item described in Schedule A.

The Hon Mark Speakman SC MP
Minister for Heritage
Sydney, 2nd Day of December 2016

SCHEDULE A
The item known as Eveleigh Railway Workshops, situated on the land described in Schedule B.

SCHEDULE B
All those pieces or parcels of land known as Lot 52 DP 1001467, Lot 8 DP 1136859, Lot 9 DP 1136859, Lot 10 DP 1136859, Lot 12 DP 1136859, Lot 1 DP 1175706, Lot 2 DP 1175706, Lot 3 DP 1175706, Lot 4 DP 1175706, Lot 4001 DP 1194309, Lot 4002 DP 1194309, Lot 4003 DP 1194309, Lot 4004 DP 1194309, Lot 4005 DP 1194309, Lot 4006 DP 1194309 and Lot 4007 DP 1194309 in Parish of Petersham, County of Cumberland shown on the plan catalogued HC 2347 in the office of the Heritage Council of New South Wales.

SCHEDULE C
Site-specific exemptions (not requiring notification to the Heritage Council of NSW or its Delegate)
Note: Any assessment of significant fabric and heritage impact will be made by a suitably qualified and experienced heritage professional.
1. All works and activities in accordance with a valid development consent in force at the date of gazettal for revised listing the Eveleigh Railway Workshops (SHR No. 01140) on the State Heritage Register under the Heritage Act 1977 (NSW).
2. Works and activities associated with the maintenance and upkeep of non-heritage fabric associated with the gardens and grounds, including mowing, tree surgery, removal or pruning of trees where works will have no adverse impact on heritage significance.
3. Maintenance and repairs to the interior fabric and finishes, including partition walls, internal glazing, lighting (non-original) and signage for buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
4. Maintenance and renewal of floor finishes inside buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
5. Internal changes to office spaces, retail, residential and other tenancy spaces and recreational facilities inside buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
6. Replacement, including upgrades to internal security devices, such as electronic door locks and keys, security cameras and motion sensors inside buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
7. Installation of temporary and reversible structures for the operation of special events and activities lasting less than one (1) month duration (e.g. for trade fairs, exhibitions etc.) for buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
8. Electrical, mechanical and hydraulic services maintenance and essential upgrades located within the building envelope and on the roof top within the envelope of the existing plant, including roof exhaust fans and associated support duct work for buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops, where there is little or no adverse visual impact on heritage significance, but excluding mobile telecommunications equipment and antennae.
9. Upgrade of mechanical equipment relating to lifts constructed since 1995 within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
10. Refurbishment of bathrooms, kitchens, kitchenettes and other service areas within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
11. Changes to and development of internal layouts, fittings and furnishings for internal retail, commercial and residential tenancies within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops, which do not increase the net-lettable area.
12. Removal or replacement of internal and inter-tenancy walls within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
13. Combination or division of tenancies requiring the alteration of internal walls within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops where there is no change in overall net-lettable area.
14. Work or changes to interior fittings and furnishings within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
15. Removal and replacement of temporary (three months duration) internal signs and decorations, such as flags, rigging, banners, merchandising, holiday livery and associated decorations within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
16. Maintenance of internal paint finishes within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
17. Changes to or development of existing roof access ladders, stairs and platforms required for safe access to these areas for buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
18. Changes to internal lighting within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
19. Replacement of carpet finishes within tenancies within buildings constructed post 1995 following closure of the Railway Workshops.
20. Maintenance and repair to existing interpretation infrastructure and signage.
Site-specific exemptions (requiring notification to the Heritage Council of NSW or its Delegate)
Note: Any assessment of significant fabric and heritage impact will be made by a suitably qualified and experienced heritage professional.
21. Minor modifications to a valid development consent in force at the date of gazettal for revised listing the Eveleigh Railway Workshops (SHR No. 01140) on the State Heritage Register under the Heritage Act 1977 (NSW), where the Heritage Council of NSW or its Delegate is satisfied that:
* The proposed works are substantially the same as the development for which consent was original
granted, before any modifications to that consent, for the purpose of this exemption only; and
* The Heritage Council of NSW has been notified in writing of the works proposed to be undertaken under this exemption prior to commencement of works, and the Heritage Council of NSW or its Delegate has provided written confirmation that the works are exempt.
22. Changes to operating hours.
23. Maintenance and repair of existing external hard paving, including roads, paths, fences, garden edges, retaining walls and gates, where works match existing materials and do not have adverse impact on heritage significance.
24. All works to the exterior and interiors of buildings erected on the site since 1995, not including works which would significantly alter the exterior architectural appearance of the new buildings.
25. External maintenance and minor repairs necessary to preserve and maintain the functioning of the buildings and landscape for their current uses and where works will have no adverse impact on heritage significance; including maintenance and minor repairs to:
* Roofing sheeting and drainage;
* Utilities including electrical, water and sewerage and stormwater drainage;
* Road and footpath pavement resurfacing;
* Road and pedestrian traffic management facilities, including gates and fencing;
* Planter boxes and public seating;
* Navigational signage and infrastructure;
* Security infrastructure and gates;
* Exterior lighting.
For works to qualify as maintenance and minor repair, any new fabric must represent like-for-like replacement of the existing fabric or reinstatement to a known earlier/ original fabric configuration and must not require any new impacts upon significant fabric.
26. Removal and replacement of non-illuminated external signs and decorations, such as flags, rigging, banners, merchandising, holiday livery and associated decorations where the size, scale and impact of the new items is the same or does not exceed that being replaced and providing that the signs and decoration are not elements remaining from the significant periods of Eveleigh's history.
27. Erection of temporary (three months duration) hoardings and scaffolding associated with maintenance or conservation of facades, windows and roof sheeting and drainage where no physical impact to heritage fabric occurs.
28. Changes to aluminium-framing and glass panels (non-heritage fabric) associated with doorways, entrances and airlocks, where such works do not materially affect the configuration of the opening.
29. Maintenance and repairs to the interior non-heritage fabric and finishes, including partition walls, internal glazing, lighting (non-original) and signage for buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
30. Maintenance and renewal of floor finishes inside buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
31. Internal changes to office spaces, retail, and other tenancy spaces and recreational facilities inside buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops, which do not involve any new works affecting original building fabric.
32. Replacement, including upgrades to internal security devices, such as electronic door locks and keys, security cameras and motion sensors inside buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops, which do not involve any new works affecting original building fabric.
33. Installation of temporary and reversible structures for the operation of special events and activities lasting less than one (1) month duration (e.g. for trade fairs, exhibitions etc.) for buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
34. Electrical, mechanical and hydraulic services maintenance and essential upgrades located within the building envelope and on the roof top within the envelope of the existing plant, including roof exhaust fans and associated support duct work for buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops, where there is little or no adverse visual impact on heritage significance, but excluding mobile telecommunications equipment and antennae.
35. Upgrade of mechanical equipment relating to lifts constructed since 1990 within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
36. Refurbishment of non-significant bathrooms, kitchens, kitchenettes and other service areas within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops with no effect on original heritage fabric.
37. Changes to and development of internal layouts, fittings and furnishings for internal retail and commercial tenancies within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops, which do not involve any new works affecting or concealing original building fabric, expression of the original internal volumes or increase to the net-lettable area.
38. Removal or replacement of non-significant inter-tenancy walls within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
39. Combination or division of tenancies requiring the alteration of non-significant internal walls within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops where there is no impact on original building fabric or significance or change in overall net-lettable area.
40. Work or changes to interior non-significant fittings and furnishings within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops with no effect on remnant heritage fabric.
41. Removal and replacement of temporary (three months duration) internal signs and decorations, such as flags, rigging, banners, merchandising, holiday livery and associated decorations within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops where works will have no adverse impact on heritage significance.
42. Maintenance of internal non-significant paint finishes within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
43. Changes to or development of existing roof access ladders, stairs and platforms required for safe access to these areas for buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops where works will have no adverse impact on heritage significance.
44. Changes to internal lighting within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
45. Material conservation of historic fabric undertaken with appropriate heritage advice and supervision from a suitably qualified and experienced heritage advisor and in accordance with the objectives of the following
as relevant:
* Eveleigh Carriageworks Conservation Management Plan, Volume 1, prepared by Otto Cserhalmi and
Partners, 2002.
* North Eveleigh West Conservation Management Plan, prepared by OCP Architects, March 2016.
* Australian Technology Park Conservation Management Plan, Volume 1, prepared by Godden Mackay
Logan, December 2013.
* South Eveleigh Precinct Heritage Assessment, Volume 1, prepared by Futurepast Heritage Consulting, July 2015.
46. Replacement of non-significant carpet finishes within tenancies within buildings constructed pre 1995 prior to closure of the Railway Workshops.
47. Relocation of Moveable Heritage items within the site precinct where such items will be kept undercover on site. Appropriate recording of the relocation activity must be undertaken and retained on site.
48. Works to maintain items of historic machinery.
Jan 27 2017

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0114002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental Plan  17 Nov 95   
National Trust of Australia register      
Register of the National Estate  26 Apr 88 1150002

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenClaire O'Rourke2003Rail workshop to become platform for inner city hub (SMH 26/7/03)
WrittenGeraldine O'Brien2003Sparks still fly over rail's long-silent workshops (SMH 2/12/03)
WrittenGraham, Ben2017'Out of Puff: Heritage tours on old trains put on hold as volunteers' workshop taken over'
WrittenHeritage Division, OEH1990Paper file: Eveleigh Railway Workshops - S90/3367
Management PlanHeritage Group, State Projects.1995Eveleigh Rail Yards Locomotive Workshops Conservation Management Plan
WrittenMcGuiness, Mark2003'Simpson, Caroline (1930–2003)' View detail
WrittenMurray, Dr.Lisa2009Redfern: a hive of industry
WrittenSchwager Brooks and Partners Pty Ltd1994Eveleigh Precinct Sydney Conservation Policy

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045103
File number: EF14/5406; EF10/20752; H05/176


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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