Queen Street Buildings Group | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Queen Street Buildings Group

Item details

Name of item: Queen Street Buildings Group
Other name/s: McGuanne House, Old Railway Hotel, William Bursill's Shop, Old Bursill's Building, The Coach House
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Retail and Wholesale
Category: Shop
Location: Lat: -34.0696997027 Long: 150.8120505330
Primary address: 284 - 298 Queen Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560
Parish: St Peter
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP827641
LOT2 DP827641
LOT3 DP827641
LOT4 DP827641
PART LOT5 DP827641
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
284 - 298 Queen StreetCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandPrimary Address
Allman StreetCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Minister For Administering The Environmental & Planning Act, 1979State Government 

Statement of significance:

The Queen Street Buildings are among the earliest buildings surviving in Campbelltown, which was one of the first centres of population to be established outside of Sydney. The buildings were owned and used by many families who played a leading role in the foundations and development of Campbelltown during the 19th Century (Phillips, 1995, Section 5.2).

The buildings retain a good deal of evidence about the way of life at the time they were constructed, the buildings were one of the first instances of the State Government buying privately owned property for the purpose of conservation. The Cumberland County Council purchased them in 1963, and was seen as a landmark movement in the history of the conservation movement in NSW. The Buildings were also among the first to be given an A classification by the National Trust (Phillips, 1995, Section 5.3).

Of the remaining Georgian design building left in Australia, even fewer are of the standard which is seen in the Queen Street terraces, they are examples of commercial and domestic buildings from the 19th Century (Phillips, 1995, Section 5.4).
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: John Doyle (hotel); William Bursill (Bursill's Shop)
Physical description: Description: Old Railway Hotel
Builder: John Doyle
Construction Years: 1844-1856

Physical Description:
The dimensions of the land are 61 perches commencing at a point in the High Street 77 feet 3 ins n-e from the n-e corner of Lot 23 purchased by William Bursill; bounded on the n-e by a line leading s-e 3 chains 45 links; on s-e by Lot 21 purchased by Ezekiel Wells a line bearing s-w 75 feet; on s-w by Lot 23 (Bursill) being a line bearing n-w to the High Street; on n-w by that street bearing n-e 77 feet and 3 ins to commencement. (Higginbotham, 1995, pg 9).

It is a Victorian Georgian style building made of stone and is 2 storeys high. It has Georgian style windows and doors, with fanlights above the exterior front doors. There are four Georgian fireplaces on the ground floor with two more on the first floor. The building has early boarded ceilings, but also some rooms have exposed ceilings with the joists showing. It has plaster and stud walls with Georgian skirting around the floors and windows (Phillips, 1995, Fig. 1 and 2).

The rear of the property contains early additions of slab and shingle sheds, and there are other later designed structures form weather board and timber (Phillips, 1995, Section 4.1).

Old Doyle's Railway Hotel was built as two buildings. The earlier building was a simple three bay cottage that was probably originally single storey in keeping with the single storey stone wall on the side elevation. This was then extended to two storeys high and the single storey rear addition may have been attached at the same time. Very soon after, the attached five bay two storey structure was added alongside. This was built with an elegant five bay verandah with turned Doric columns (paired at the entry). From other hotels and coach houses of the period, it is possible that the two attached buildings may have accommodated two classes of people (LEP, 2016).

The verandah was later removed and a new verandah introduced across the entire Queen Street face of the building with flat timber columns sometime between 1880-1900. Further additions were then added to the rear of the property in the later styles of late Victorian and Federation periods. The rear timber slab hut is likely to be an early element of the site.

The original buildings are built mainly in brick, with only the earliest single storey phase done in stone (LEP, 2016).
The building was acquired by the NSW Planning & Environment Commission and restoration of the building commenced in 1971 by Fisher, Jackson and Hudson (Phillips, 1995, pg.2).

Current Use: Doctors Surgery
Former Use: Hotel


Description: Old William Bursill's Shop, Legacy House
Builder: William Bursill
Construction Years: 1840s

Physical Description:
The dimensions of the land were 1 road 24 perches part of Joseph Phelps 140acres bounded on the n-w at a point on the s-e side of high street 2 chains 65 links s-w from its junction with Allman Street; by the High Street bearing s-w 1 chain and 32 links on the s-w by a line bounding Lot 24 bearing s-e 3 chains and 10 links; on the s-e by a line bearing n-e 1 chain and 32 links ; on the n-w by the boundary of Lot 22 bearing n-w 3 chains and 20 links to point of commencement (Higginbotham, 1995, pg 12).

It is a Victorian Georgian style two storey building and is made from stone. It has typical Georgian doors and windows, a traditional Victorian shop front, with early stone thresholds. It also has early doors and linings around the doors and windows. The floor is early stone with some early and some modern skirtings. There is a lot of early glass still remaining in the windows on the first floor. There are also stud walls, and early glazed doors. The rear room contains shingle battens and the early floor and roof structure remains (Phillips, 1995, Fig. 3 & 4).

With the building being vacant for some time it has been vandalized, resulting in rear openings being boarded up. The stone at the rear of the building shows the mortar joints made form seashells, and there is evidence of limewash (Phillips, 1995, Section 6.6).

Restoration was undertaken by Architect Morton Herman and during the restoration part of William Bursill's old shop sign was uncovered (Phillips, 1995, pg.3).

Current Use: Leased to Legacy
Former Use: Shop and residence


Description: Coaching House:
Dating to the 1840s, a pair of two-storey townhouses, separated by a wide coach drive off Queen Street. The central opening on the ground floor boasts two large timber gates, which were opened to allow horse-drawn vehicles access to the stables that once stood at the rear of the building. Cast iron Ionic columns support the sturdy verandah. Architect Morton Herman restored the building in 1964 (CCC, undated 7).

A two storey Colonial Georgian Coaching Inn with central coachway extending through the building to the rear yard. The access is closed off with ornate timber gates. The Inn is constructed of sandstock bricks with the front elevation cement rendered and painted. The two storey colonnaded verandah to the street has two round timber columns with ionic capitals and two box timber columns on the ground level, with a timber balcony railing on the upper level. The verandah roof and eaves all have timber soffits. The roof is clad in corrugated iron, and it has an unusual form with a gable to one end and a gabled hip to the other end. There is a separate entrance to the building in each of the ground floor 'wings' either side of the coachway.

There are a variety of windows in the building, most with sandstone sills. The ground floor windows to the street are double hung, timber sashed of six panes to both upper and lower sashes. The upper level openings to the verandah are a central double hung, timber sashed window of six panes to both upper and lower sashes flanked by paired timber sashed, centre opening french windows giving access to the verandah. The north side and rear windows are double hung, timber sashed of six panes to both upper and lower sashes, with brick voussoirs above. The window to the south is a tall arched timber window, double hung, timber sashed and of six panes to both upper and lower sashes and with an arched fanlight above. The original window and door joinery appears intact.

Nothing is known of the integrity of the interiors and these should be assessed as soon as possible.
Current use: 288: currently vacant (11/2018).
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, hotel, shops

History

Historical notes: The original inhabitants of the Campbelltown area were mostly people of the Dharawal (sometimes referred to as Tharawal) language group, who ranged from the coast to the east, the Georges River in the west, north to Botany Bay and south to Nowra. However, Campbelltown was a meeting point with the Dharug language group (whose area extended across the Blue Mountains), and early history of the area includes references to both peoples. (Liston, Carol: Campbelltown: The Bicentennial History, 1988; www.abc.net.au/indigenous). Mount Annan, to the south-west of the Campbelltown City Centre, was known as Yandel'ora to its original owners, the Dharawal people and was an important meeting place for Aboriginal people from as far away as northern Queensland and southern Victoria. (http://www.daff.gov.au/natural-resources/landcare/publications/making_a_difference_a_celebration_ of_landcare/section_6_-_indigenous_landcare).

With the establishment of the convict colony in Sydney Harbour in 1788, the displacement of Aboriginal people began. A smallpox epidemic decimated many of the coastal clans, but was less destructive amongst the inland peoples.

Escaped cattle from the settlement moved south and bred in the Campbelltown/Camden area and after their discovery in 1795, the area became known as The Cow Pastures (or Cowpasture). In 1805, John Macarthur obtained a grant of 5,000 acres (later expanded to 10,000 acres) in the area, some of the best grazing land then known in the colony.

By 1809, 34 settlers had received grants in the newly named Minto district (named after Lord Minto, the Governor-General of India) in the northern portion of Campbelltown. Many of these early settlers were Irish, including surveyor James Meehan, who allocated himself a generous portion (now Macquarie Fields). Prominent settlers included surgeon Charles Throsby, who was allocated 600 acres (now Glenfield), Dr William Redfern (Campbellfield), Dr Robert Townson (Varroville) and Richard Brooks (Denham Court).

Though peaceful, the Dharawal bore the brunt of a punitive expedition led by Captain James Wallis in 1816. At least 14 Dharawal people were massacred at Appin, to the distress of sympathetic settlers such as Charles Throsby of Glenfield. The Appin massacre of 1816 was a devastating and tragic event for the Dharawal people and other local clans, and was a difficult period in terms of the relationship between Indigenous people and European settlers. Corroborees and other ceremonies continued under the protection of the Macarthurs of Camden, though numbers steadily declined, with diseases introduced by the Europeans also having a devastating effect on the Dharawal population.

As the district became more closely settled, a town was needed further south than Liverpool. Campbelltown was formally established in 1820 and named 'Campbelltown', in honour of Mrs Elizabeth Macquarie's maiden name of Campbell. In 1826, the town plan was formalised.

Between 1835 and 1845, the number of Aboriginal people in the Campbelltown Police District had decreased from twenty to none. However, limited tribal life continued and corroborees were still held at Camden Park and Denham Court until at least the 1850s. During 1858, approximately 200 Aboriginal people attended the celebrations at Campbelltown that were held to mark the opening of the railway line (LEP, 2016).

Campbelltown:
Permanent European settlement in the Campbelltown area had begun in 1809 as an alternative to the flood-prone Hawkesbury district. Work on a road from Sydney to Liverpool was started in 1811. It was opened in August 1814 and was soon extended further south to Appin. This road, variously known as Campbelltown Road, Appin Road or the Sydney Road, passed through Campbelltown. The section through the town was called the High Street until the last decade of the 19th century when it was renamed Queen Street (Orwell & Peter Phillips, 1995, vol.2, 1-2).

The land on which the Queen Street cottages stand was part of a grant of 140 acres to Joseph Phelps in 1816. He had been working the land for some years before receiving formal title to it. Phelps was one of the farmers of Airds and Appin who subscribed funds for a Sydney courthouse in July 1813. His grant was seized, possibly as soon as it was formally issued, by the Provost Marshal, William Gore in lieu of payment by Phelps of debts totalling 170 pounds. THe land was auctioned in January 1817 to William Bradbury for 100 pounds plus twelve cattle and the grain produced from the crop growing on the land (ibid, 1995).

Immediately north of Phelps' grant, Assistant Surveyor James Meehan had informally reserved 175 acres for a village (AMCG, 1994 say 'in 1815'.) In 1816 most of the land in the area was granted, leaving a portion of 175 acres unalienated, and surrounded by several grants (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The reserved land was formally declared a town by Governor Macquarie in December 1820 and named Campbelltown in honour of his wife (Elizabeth)'s family (ibid, 1995).

William Bradbury (1774-1836) a native of Birmingham, was transported to NSW aboard the 'Guildford' in 1812. His wife Elizabeth remained in England but his daughter, Mary (1797-1852) followed her father to Australia in 1815. Bradbury had no other children in NSW, though he established a relationship with a woman named Alice and in April 1836 married a Campbelltown widow, Catherine Patrick, nee Acres (c.1801-1883). Bradbury died two months later (ibid, 1995, 2).

Governor Macquarie visited Campbelltown in January 1822. He and his party ate a 'hearty' breakfast at 'Bradbury's', indicating that Bradbury had built an inn. This was probably the inn later known as the Royal Oak, on the western side of the High Street. Macquarie noted in his journal that 'Bradbury is building a very good two storey brick house on his own farm and on a very pretty eminence immediately adjoining Campbell-Town as an inn for the accommodation fo the public, and having asked me to give his farm a name, I have called it Bradbury Park. In 1826 Bradbury Park House was considered by William Dumaresq, inspector of roads and bridges, as the best building in Campbelltown when he reported on buildings suitable for military use (ibid, 1995, 2).

As the main street of Campbelltown, High Street or Sydney Road and later Queen Street, was at the edge of town, one side of the street was not within the town boundary while the other was. Canny traders soon realised that either side of the main road was as good as the other and leased or bought land from the grantees bordering the town proper. By the 1840s more than a few shops and hotels occupied the western side of the High Street (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The coming of the railway in 1858 aided in securing the commercial focus of the town on Queen Street (ibid, 1994, 9).

Queen Street Group:
The Queen Street Group was originally Lot s 22-24 of the subdivision of the Bradbury Park Estate, and was owned by Mary and George Cannon. In October 1844, the land was sold to four different land owners, who each built on their sites from 1844. The group was largely in place and completed by 1855. Some verandahs were added in the 1870s, and some small additions occurred in the 1890s (LEP, 2016).

For the second half of the 19th century the group became the commercial centre of town. This can be seen in the fact that the original heart of town moved up the hill in the 1880s, from its location at the Sydney end of High Street (Queen Street) around the Court House, St Peter's Church and the railway station, up to the hill where the Queen Street Group and Alpha House stood. In the early 1880s the Post Office was moved in this direction, the banks were built here and shortly afterwards the Town Hall was built nearby (ibid, 2016).

The financial success of the area in the 1840s and 1850s faded during the 1860s and 1870s as the wheat crops were devastated by rust. The town remained healthy enough but did not expand greatly from the end of the nineteenth century until the middle of the twentieth (ibid, 2016).

In the post war period Campbelltown was selected as a major sub-regional centre to accommodate Sydney's fast growing population. As the population rose, so did the development pressure on the town, and a great many of the town's heritage buildings were bulldozed from the 1960s -1980s. The outstanding quality and significance of the Group was recognised and active steps taken to protect it and its setting from the immense development pressure in Campbelltown during the period (ibid, 2016).

The Queen Street Group has been preserved through the extraordinary policies that prevailed in the 1960s NSW Government of purchasing endangered buildings of significance and undertaking conservation works to ensure their long term survival (ibid, 2016).

Old McGuanne House (286 Queen Street):
This house sits on a site that was originally the north eastern half of Lot 22 of the subdivision of the Bradbury Park Estate, and was owned by Mary and George Cannon. In October 1844 the land was sold to George Fullerton, a Doctor of Medicine. Fullerton held the property until 1853, and so it is most likely that he built the building on the site. The structure today is fully rendered and lined, but there is no evidence that this finish was chosen to disguise that the house was built in stages, and was more likely a matter of choice. Early (1870s) photos show that the original finish was plain brick (LEP, 2016).

In 1853 Fullerton sold the site to Henry Bradley, a solicitor. It then passed through the hands of Thomas Chippendale and James Turner until, in 1860, it was purchased by Martin McGuanne, a shoemaker. From this point the building was owned by the McGuanne family for nearly a century. The 1872 Greville's List of Businesses has Martin McGuanne, bootmaker, listed in Queen Street.

In 1875 the first branch of the CBC Bank opened in the building until their own building almost opposite in Queen Street was completed in 1881 (ibid, 2016).

In 1955 the site was sold to J Tyler and T Leach. The building suffered from vandalism and neglect until it was bought by the Cumberland County Council in 1963 as part of the group of Georgian buildings in Queen Street recognised for their rarity and heritage significance (ibid, 2016).

The building was then restored in 1964 by Morton Herman. An 1871 photo (003604 in Campbelltown City Library collection) shows that the building was originally a face brick building with exposed sandstone sills and lintels, and had timber shingles on the roof. At this time there was no verandah, and the shopfront was a multi-paned timber Georgian shopfront and likely to have been original. The surrounds to this shopfront have survived, but the details have been inserted using the Old Bursill's Building as a template. A photograph dated c1950s (000590 in Campbelltown City Library collection) appears to show today's modified shopfront, so this change predates Herman's restoration works (ibid, 2016).

A photograph dated 1875 (003352 in Campbelltown City Library collection) shows that the verandah had now been added. This also coincides with the use of the building by the CBC Bank (ibid, 2016).

A third photograph (003455 in Campbelltown City Library collection) shows that the verandah had become unstable, and it is understood that it blew off the building in a storm during the 1980s and was then fully reconstructed (ibid, 2016).

The property was listed on the Register of the National Estate in 1978. A Permanent Conservation Order was made in 1979 and was listed on the State Heritage Register in 1999 (ibid, 2016).

The building is now used by professional offices (ibid, 2016).
OLD RAILWAY HOTEL (288-290 Queen Street)
Old Doyle's Railway Hotel sits on a site that was originally the south western half of Lot 22 of the subdivision of the Bradbury Park Estate, and was owned by Mary and George Cannon. In October 1844, the land was sold to John Hilt, a coachman from Sydney for (Pounds)30. In August 1845 John Hilt sold his land to John Doyle, a blacksmith and wheelwright, of Campbelltown and at this time there was no evidence of buildings. Doyle and his family owned the land until 1908 (LEP, 2016).

Shortly after 1845 Doyle built a two storey building on the site. Close examination of the building shows that it was built as two separate buildings at a very similar time. From Queen Street, the left part of the building was a five bay two storey building, and on the right was a three bay two storey building. The two have very similar details but the brickwork does not align, indicating one side was built first. The way the bricks have been cut in shows that the smaller three bay section was the first built (ibid, 2016).

In 1856 Sylvester Byrne transferred his inn license from The Sportsman's Arms in Campbelltown and rented the building owned by Doyle. However, Byrne soon became bankrupt and had to give up his license. Doyle took over the license from Byrne and ran the inn as Doyle's Railway Hotel. The railway arrived in Campbelltown in 1858, and Campbelltown was the terminus of the line until the further extension of the southern line was completed to Goulburn in 1869 (ibid, 2016).

At this stage the building contained a bar, two parlours, a dining room, three bedrooms, smaller room with bed and a well-equipped kitchen. A photo dated 1871 (003604 Campbelltown Library) shows that the building was still treated as two separate buildings. The left five bay building had a Georgian verandah with turned Doric columns, paired at the central entry door. The attached three bay building had no verandah. The roof appears to have been shingles at this time. There was a sign hung outside the three bay section reading "Doyle's Railway Hotel", and a painted sign on the side of the five bay section in the same name (ibid, 2016).

The hotel was later run by Thomas James who during his management converted the wooden slab hut coach house into a music and dance hall. After John Doyle died he passed the estate on to his children, and in 1896 it was still known as Doyle's Railway Hotel. In 1896 an extensive collection of outbuildings were constructed and coach builder operated from the premises. It is entirely possible that the Doyle brothers operated from the property as they operated as both blacksmiths and undertakers during the 1890s (ibid, 2016).

A photo from 1900 (002070 Campbelltown Library) shows that the verandah had by this time been extended across both buildings and the posts changed to their present type and setout. A sign at fascia level then read "Railway Hotel". This sign appears to have been removed by 1910 (ibid, 2016).

John's son, Nicholas Doyle, died in 1907 and his sister Annie Doyle sold the property and others to Edwin and William Fieldhouse, storekeepers in 1908. They had various mortgages over Doyle's property since 1904, and had not been repaid. Between 1908 and 1921 the hotel was possibly let to various occupants (ibid, 2016).

In 1921 the property was sold to Cecilia and Henry Meredith. It changed hands again in 1943 when they sold the building to Mr. J L Froggatt who renamed the building "Bonito", at which time the building then became "Bonito Flats" and was subdivided for residential accommodation (ibid, 1995, 9-11).

The State Planning Authority purchased the building in 1971 and restoration of the building was undertaken by Fisher, Jackson and Hudson (Orwell and Peter Phillips, 1995, p 2). The property was listed on the Register of the National Estate in 1978. A Permanent Conservation Order was made in 1979 and it was listed on the State Heritage Register in 1999.

Formerly occupied as a doctors surgery, it is now occupied by the Benevolent Society of NSW who run programs for the Macarthur Region (2009). The building has been used for the Campbelltown Centre for Women's Health since 1992. The sign at the front now refers to the building as Mary Windeyer House, after an early suffragette and campaigner for women and children's health and welfare (ibid, 2016).

The land was originally under the subdivision for Bradbury Park estate owned by Mary and George Cannon, it was the southern half of Lot 22. In October 1844, Mary and George Cannon sold the land to John Hilt a coachman from Sydney for (Pounds)30. In August 1845 John Hilt sold his land to John Doyle, blacksmith and wheelwright of Campbelltown and at this time there was no evidence of buildings. Doyle and his family owned the land until 1908 (ibid, 1995, 9-11).

Between 1844 and 1856 the Doyle family built a two storey building and in 1856 it was first licensed by licensee Sylvester Byrne who had transferred the license from The Sportsman's Arms in Campbelltown (ibid, 1995, 9-11).

Old Bursill's Building / Bursill's Store (now Legacy House), 292 Queen Street:
The Old Bursill's Building sits on a site that originally occupied the majority of Lot 23 of the subdivision of the Bradbury Park Estate, and was owned by Mary and George Cannon. In October 1844, the land consisting of 1 rood 24 perches (1,620m2) was sold to William Bursill, an auctioneer from Campbelltown for (Pounds)45 (LEP, 2016)

The Bursill family are significant property owners in Campbelltown's history, but this building should not be confused with Samuel Bursill's Store, which stood in Queen St beside the old Bank of NSW, which was built in 1892 by William's son, who also owned Glenalvon, and would be Mayor for five years. In fact William Bursill only owned Lot 23 of the Bradbury Estate for five years until he left Campbelltown to join the goldfields at Summerhill Creek in 1851 (ibid, 2016).

At some point between 1844-1850 William Bursill built a substantial stone building on the site. How much of it was built by Bursill, and how much was built later is unclear. The fabric evidence clearly shows that the building was built in stages and although stylistically consistent, whether they all occurred within those five years is unknown (ibid, 2016).

Bursill showed his business acumen by moving into the tanning business after the collapse of the wool industry in the early 1840s. Tanning and the making of tallow was the only way sheep farmers could make a return during the late 1840s. Given the stench associated with tanning, it is likely that the rear of the site was the tanning works, and the front building the shop and residence. Bursill ran a boot shop in conjunction with the tanning works, which is further evidence that the shopfronts are original (ibid, 2016).

Bursill sold the site with buildings to the Campbelltown postmaster William Fowler in October 1850 for (Pounds)375, a substantial increase in six years. There are notes in some histories that William Fowler ran the Post Office from this building up to 1880. This is unlikely to be the case as there was a Post Office in Queen Street between Lithgow and Cordeaux Streets that operated from the 1860s until the new Post Office was built in 1883. It is more likely that Fowler leased the building as shops. It appears Fowler retired from his role as Postmaster in 1879, with his sons taking his place. At the same time he offered the Old Bursill's Building up for sale. It was described as a building with 18' (460mm) stone walls, the ground floor consisting of a four room shop, with six rooms upstairs. It had a separate kitchen, storeroom and pantry in brick and stone, and outside there was a stable and coach house. The asking price was (Pounds)1,450 (ibid, 2016).

It wasn't until 1881 that the store was sold to Joseph Atkinson, an innkeeper, for (Pounds)1,050 with a (Pounds)550 mortgage. Part of the building was leased to S Fisher for (Pounds)50 p.a. and another part to W Price also for (Pounds)50 p.a. Atkinson was one of the first aldermen elected to Campbelltown Council in 1882 (ibid, 2016).

By October 1886, Joseph Atkinson had become a publican at Windsor, and the premises were sold to James Wilson, a butcher, for (Pounds)675. There had been no changes to the block. James Wilson was a partner of Daniel Fowler, who had married William Bursill's daughter and worked in his family business, although his first wife had died in 1859 and he remarried in 1866 . Wilson also owned other land in Campbelltown. Thomas Gamble, later a Mayor of Campbelltown, lived in the Old Bursill's Building in 1891 (ibid, 2016).

Wilson died in 1912, and his estate passed to his wife Helen. Extraordinarily she gave the entire premises to George Chinnocks, a storekeeper, for a total of ten shillings. Like Wilson, Chinnocks had been a butcher in Campbelltown in the 1890s and expanded to become a general storekeeper by 1912. The building was called Stanwell House at the time, and also became known as Chinnocks' Newsagency. Chinnocks owned the property until his death in 1938 (ibid, 2016).

Given the odd circumstances of Chinnocks' ownership, while the property was inherited by Georgina Highfield and her son Norman Campbell, an electrician, in 1938, it wasn't until after the war in 1946 that the title was confirmed. The building was eventually purchased by the Cumberland County Council in 1963 for (Pounds)12,000. Like some other Queen Street buildings, the Old Bursill Building suffered from vandalism and neglect in the 1950s. The building was restored by Morton Herman in 1964 (ibid, 2016).

The building had left Government ownership before the 1998 DUAP Section 170 Register was prepared. The property appears to have been leased to Legacy for some time, leading to it being called "Legacy House" in some documents. It is now leased to a number of small businesses (ibid, 2016).

The Old Coach House (298 Queen Street):
The Old Coach House sits on a site that was originally the south western half of Lot 24 of the subdivision of the Bradbury Park Estate, and was owned by Mary and George Cannon. In October 1844, the land was sold to Samuel Lovely, a yeoman (freehold farmer). In 1853 the building was acquired by Patrick McMahon, a wheelwright, and in 1858 it was sold to John Cobb and James Bocking, builders. Bocking and Cobb constructed a coach house on the site, most likely shortly after they purchased the property (LEP, 2016).

The front of the building shows no evidence of staged construction as noted in the other Queen St buildings, although all rear openings have segmental arched heads, indicating that the rear sections were probably built late in the nineteenth century. The front and southwest walls have been rendered and lined, concealing any changes (ibid, 2016).

James Bocking (b.1830) is a significant local figure. He was born in Norfolk, England and was a foreman of public works for the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace in 1851. This shows he was a man with connections, and he arrived in Australia in 1853. He gained government employment as a bridge builder, constructing numerous bridges in the south west of the colony. Impressed by the area Bocking settled in Campbelltown in 1857 (ibid, 2016).

The Cowper Government appointed him a magistrate. Cobb and Bocking's arrival in Campbelltown had immediate consequences for the Wesleyan Church. Having joined the church, the two men were critical of the Rev Fillingham, and lead a break-away movement to form an independent Congregational Church in 1857. Cobb and Bocking were the architects and builders for the new Congregational Church in 1859. The break-away movement was so significant that the Wesleyan Church closed in 1864 for about twenty years. The Congregational Church (demolished 1981) also used Ionic columns and had a open area in the roof, just as originally found in their other construction project of the time, the Old Coach House (c1858)(ibid, 2016).

Bocking also established the 'Sons of Temperance' movement and in 1862 built the Temperance Hall almost opposite the Coach House. In 1884 this building would be purchased by the newly formed Council as its Town Hall. Bocking, as Mayor through 1890-91, has his name inscribed in the horse trough and pilaster that commemorate the Incorporation of the Municipality in 1882. He was one of the founding aldermen in 1882 and remained on Council thirty years later. In 1878 Bocking bought Kendall's Mill in Queen Street and gained the rights to Larkin's windmill in 1870, but had to close the mill down in 1884 due to the collapse of local wheat production due to rust. Bocking was also instrumental in providing a Manse for the Congregational Church in 1882. Bocking remained a successful local businessman and property owner, with a local store in Commerce House through the 1890s. Bocking was a senior dignitary at the 1920 Centenary celebrations in the town, and at his death in 1926 was the oldest resident of Campbelltown, aged 96 (ibid, 2016).

A later Mayor of Campbelltown (in 1896-97), Thomas Gamble, lived in the Coach House in 1880. In 1912, after 54 years of ownership, Bocking and Cobb sold the building to Mary Harvey Brown, who then sold it in 1920 to Charles Hannaford, who also became Mayor of Campbelltown. In 1953 it was sold to Helen Roope, and it was sold again in 1957 to Joseph Dimarco. The building was reportedly neglected and vandalised for many years during this period. In 1963 the building was purchased by the Cumberland County Council and employed Morton Herman to restore the building. New joinery was replaced with a splayed detail instead of a matching profile, and from this we can tell that a number of doors and windows were replaced. In some instances it was Herman's practice to introduce Georgian detailing were none originally existed, and so the rear twelve pane double hung reconstructed windows may have originally been late Victorian windows. The arched Georgian window on the side elevation also appears to be a reconstruction with textured glass (ibid, 2016).

There is a local story that the Coach House was once used by Cobb and Co as a staging post, which is not an unreasonable claim, but may be a misunderstanding derived from the coincidence of name with owner John Cobb in the 1850s (ibid, 2016).

Early photos show that the right hand window on the ground floor looking from Queen Street was a much larger opening with three casements, possibly for some form of shop. Herman converted this back to a Georgian twelve pane double hung window (ibid, 2016).

The building was owned by the (then) Department of Urban Affairs and Planning and was listed on the DUAP Section 170 register, but was removed when sold to a private owner in 2007. It remains on the State Heritage Register (ibid, 2016).

In late 2018 Campbelltown City Council bought 288 (the Coach House) and 298 (Old Railway Hotel) Queen Street. Council plans to undertake restoration work on both buildings and is currently considering a range of options for their long-term use (Zautsen, 2018).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Shopkeeping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Innkeeping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services butcher-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Hotel accommodation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Hotel accommodation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Demonstrating Governor Macquarie's town and landscape planning-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Suburban Centres-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Commercial strip development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Queen Street terraces 288-294 are significant because together they constitute one of the very few relatively intact Georgian Style townscapes in NSW.

The buildings were occupied by several families who were intimately connected with the development of Campbelltown during the 19th Century.

They occupy a section of Queen Street which became the focus of commercial town life following the subdivision of the Bradbury Estate in the 1840's.

These buildings are believed to be among the first to be acquired and restored by the NSW Government for the purpose of conserving the states environmental heritage, and therefore represent an impact landmark in the history of conservation (Phillips, 1995, pg 7).
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The buildings retain much of the fabric of the major phases of development since their construction in the mid 19th Century including several outbuildings and archaeological relics.

The buildings and site are physical reminders of the history of the town of Campbelltown.

The Queen Street historic precinct makes an important contribution to the quality of the streetscape of Campbelltown.

The site is a valuable archaeological resource with potential to add to existing knowledge about early life in Campbelltown (Phillips, 1995, pg. 7).
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act See File For Schedule. Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities:
(1)The engaging in or carrying out by any person for or on behalf of the Director of Environment and Planning of any activity requiring pursuant to section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.
Jan 9 1987
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0000702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0000712 Apr 79 521758
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67     
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCampbelltown City Council, undated Macarthur Heritage Directory
WrittenCarroll, Brian1983The Hume - Australia’s Highway of History – a Heritage Field Guide
WrittenLayt, Jess2018'Three iconic buildings up for auction'
WrittenLucas, Clive & McGinness, Mark2012'John Fisher - 1924-2012 - champion of state's structures'
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips Architects 19901990Conservation Management Plan for The Queen St Historic Precinct Campbelltown
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips Architects 1995 (inlcudes site history by Higginbotham 1995)1995Conservation Management Plan - 288-294 Queen St Campbelltown Vol. 1&2
WrittenZautsen,2018'Buyers revealed for historic Queen St. Buildings'

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045135
File number: S90/06108 & HC32175


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