Mail Coach Inn (former) | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Mail Coach Inn (former)

Item details

Name of item: Mail Coach Inn (former)
Other name/s: (Former) (Royal) Mail Coach Inn; (current trading name (but historically inaccurate) is The Coach & Horses Inn(
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Inn/Tavern
Location: Lat: -34.4890603501 Long: 150.3328928520
Primary address: 24 Jellore Street, Berrima, NSW 2577
Parish: Berrima
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP780565
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
24 Jellore StreetBerrimaWingecarribeeBerrimaCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
David and Wendy PaleyPrivate 

Statement of significance:

The former (Royal) Mail Coach Inn is significant through associations with the local community of Berrima and as a somewhat architectually unusual component of the town's stock of early buildings. The building is also a component of the Jellore Street group, though it varies from the usual form of its neighbours with its asymmetrical front layout and other features such as half-gabled roof (LEP, 1990, modified viz correct historic name of the inn - Stuart Read, 15/1/2014).
Date significance updated: 15 Jan 14
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1833-1841
Physical description: Site:
The Coach & Horses Inn (former) and adjacent Berrima Inn (former) play a significant role in and contribute to the streetscape of the Jellore Street / Berrima Market Square precinct and make the aesthetic appreciation of the casual observer of the Berrima village (although a smaller role than the prominent White Horse Inn on a rise above the Old Hume Highway, opposite). The inns contribute to the predominantly Colonial/Victorian Georgian architecture of the Berrima village and the Jellore Street precinct (Webb, 2008, 35, paraphrased by Stuart Read, 23/1/9).

The site forms part of the Jellore Street group of early cottages. It lies generally in a north-south orientation on the northern side of Berrima Market Square on a gentle north-sloping site between Jellore Street and the Wingecarribee River. It comprises a cluster of buildings near the street behind a picket fence, with a gravel car parking area on the front western side, a brick paved courtyard behind the inn, a lawn area between the cottage outbuilding (former kitchen) and stone outbuilding to its rear, a garden area with trees sloping down to the north to a fence and gate and the Wingecarribee River at its north. The building group is connected by brick and stone paving, surrounded by small gardens (garden beds) and native trees, grouped in rolling lawns to the north.

There is a view to the Berrima Gaol from the rear of the property. Well maintained gardens and vegetation fall to the northern boundary, fence and gate leading down steeper grassed banks to the river. Situated also on the site are various trees, freestanding storage building (former outdoor privy) and vegetable gardens (Allman Johnston, 2007, 11).

The 1930 aerial photograph shows there are no mature trees or significant (sized) garden (elements) on the site. It is not until the 1969 aerial photograph that any trees (an apple and a poplar, both still on site)(Webb, 2008, 29) are evident on the site, indicating that almost all vegetation is less than 40 years old (Webb, 2008, 17).

A sketch of the site in 1979 includes a picket fence and an entrance timber pergola, the original stone boundary fence to the east, and a water tank and small tree to the rear of the house (both now removed).

The garden is predominantly a modern installation (post 1969/1988) with only few trees displaying maturity, including an apple (Malus domestica cv.) north of Dandarbong cottage and a Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra 'Italica') on the western boundary north of Daphne cottage. Other trees within the common area are young eucalypts, wattles, poplars and seedling Prunus sp. to the north of the building group, and three deciduous trees adjacent to the entrance to the car park (ibid, 51).

The gardens between the buildings and Jellore Street are typically cottage in style with use of lavender, apple blossom (Escallonia sp.) and Abelia grandiflora as hedges. Exotic trees and shrubs such as Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia), Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) and Iowa crabapple (Malus ioensis) provide seasonal interest and maintain the landscape character and connection to the Jellore Street-scape and the exotic Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) planting of the Market Square opposite.

There are no significant trees on site. The oldest trees are the apple and the poplar noted above. These appeared in aerial photographs between 1949 and 1969, making them between 40-60 years old. They are not considered significant due to age or rarity.

The original residence has limited connection to the river and views to the north, including Berrima Gaol, as it is heavily screened by maturing vegetation, including that of neighbouring properties. The additional buildings on site built in 1988 have almost completely obscured visibility to Wingecarribee River from the original building. The only window in the main residence with possible views to the river is the bathroom window. There are no windows to the north on the free-standing kitchen building.

Important views have been prioritised in the following list and identified in FIgure 10:
1. view of early colonial/Victorian colonial building from Market Square/Jellore Street;
2. view of the Coach and Horses Inn from Market Square in the context of the surrounding buildings of a similar period of development;
3. view of the building group from Market Square/ Jellore Street as a single unit;
4. views from the southern windows of the original residence across Market Square;
5. view to the river from the northern section of the garden and Dandarbong cottage;
6. view from the northern section of the garden to the Gaol;
7. view from across the river into the northern section of the garden (ibid, 29-30).

The outdoor privvy is evident in all the aerial photographs however during the 1988 building works it was rebuilt using recycled stone.

All other buildings on site were erected during the Timmis ownership from 1988-90. Paths, driveways, fences and paved areas were also added during this time. The new plantings on site, including the semi-mature trees, were added after the 1988 renovations (ibid, 20).

There are 6 buildings on site (2007)(ibid, 2008) being:
1) Inn:
1830s-80s A 6 room structure, built in three stages from the 1830s, 1850s and 1880s, comprising:
This has a strong connection to Berrima Market Place primarily due to its proximity to the street and high visibility from many locations in the Market Place. The setback of the original residence places the building behind the setback of the two neighbouring properties, Berrima Inn and Victoria Inn (Webb, 2008, 23).
Brick rendered marked out in stone joints; 12 pane single hung sash windows
Building Material: Brick rendered marked out in stone joints; 12 pane single hung sash windows (National Trust, 1974).
Single story cottage of painted, cement-rendered masonry (ruled to resemble ashlar stone).
Asymmetrical front elevation features a hipped roofed projecting wing to east and with unusual angled bay window (with small roof-hood over). The remainder of the front elevation has a skillion roofed verandah supported on square timber posts.
Windows to front are 2 x 6 pane single hung sashes. Main roof is half gabled and clad in corrugated steel (LEP, 1990).

Comprises 2 bedrooms, lounge, combined kitchen and dining, bathroom and store room. All are contained within the footprint of the original 1856 building which shows evidence of significant degree of footprint and internal fabric intactness that has received modification and intrusive elements and materials to the 3 rear rooms over years of ownership (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10).

Internally divided into 6 rooms, consisting of lounge room, two bedrooms, bathroom, dressing room and kitchen. The laundry is located externally and under an added skillion roof. All living areas have been renovated in the last 20 years, with new plaster ceilings, cove cornice, plastered and painted walls and painted skirting boards. Living and bed rooms have timber floors, with permanent or occasional carpets (Webb, 2008, 25 (more detail is available at same source, pp.25-6).

2) Inn cottage to rear of inn (on eastern boundary):
1856 cottage outbuilding (former kitchen block). Freestanding single storey simple room in brick with symmetrial hipped corrugated iron roof and close eaves. Brick is rendered. Exhibits significant fireplaces and together with its footprint still confirms the original intactness of the former kitchen which served the inn. These were traditionally detached. The western facade is punctured by two windows and a timber door arranged symmetrically. Currently linked by a more recent flat roof addition and laundry cupboard extension (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10).

3) Sandstone outbuilding to rear of Inn cottage (also on eastern boundary):
freestanding storage building (former outdoor privy). Reconstructed and renovated in 1988, using materials excess to building needs for the two cottages. Internal walls rendered and new toilet installed (Webb, 2008, 27).

4) 1988 double weatherboard garage (to rear (north) of Stone outbuilding, also on eastern boundary):
Double garage of treated pine pole supports timber framed and weatherboard gabling with a metal gabled roof. Shows evidence of a reconstruction from a previous dilapidated garage and is evidence of refurbishing in the last 15 years (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10). Built using recycled materials by Brian Timmis in 1988 (ibid, 27).

5) 1988 weatherboard cottage (south-west of Inn, in middle of block) 'Dandenong (Dandarbong (ibid, 2008)) Cottage';
Constructed in the style of an early timber weatherboard cottage in a rudimentary (simple, rectangular) form as it contains no internal wall or ceiling linings with all frame work exposed (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10). Gabled corrugated iron roof running east-west. Internal finishes include painted and stained exposed timber beams and studs, with a polished timber floor. Surrounded by a corrugated iron roofed verandah on the south-west and north, (Webb, 2008, 27)) which links it to 'Daphne' cottage (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10).

6) 1988 2 storey brick barn (south-west of inn on western boundary) 'Daphne Cottage':
Although the setback for Daphne cottage is behind the line of the early buildings, the height of the cottage gives it a dominant presence when viewed from the street. The north-south orientation and tall two storey gabled roof that addresses the street is in contrast to all other buildings that can be viewed from Jellore Street (Webb, 2008, 23).
Brick two-storey simple rectangular structure with a gable roof running north-south. The southern facade is of dressed stone work and through its construction materials and finishes indicates its construction during the 1988-90 period. Comprises a large single ground floor room timber framed boxed corner bathroom with timber stairs leading to a large attic bedroom (Allman Johnston, 2007, 10). The ground floor with finishes of exposed brick and timber floors accomodates a living area and kitchen. The timber staircase leads to a carpeted single bedroom, leading out to a northern timber deck overlooking the Wingecarribee River. The southern facade was built with recycled stone from the Sydney Museum (ibid, 26-7).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Site internal and external inspection did not include underfloor or closed roof space. This examination identified no clear evidence of remnants or archaeological artefacts belonging to earlier structures that may have existed on site (Allman Johnston, 2007,10,12)
Date condition updated:24 Aug 07
Modifications and dates: 1833-41 original section built (eastern bedroom).
1850s extension to include current lounge room east of original section and a fireplace.

1880s Victorian bay window and extension added to eastern side, now used as second bedroom (Webb, 2008, 5, 20). A new extension at the residence's rear forms the house's kitchen and bathroom (ibid, 20, 22)..

1930s-1969: no new buildings built on site. The 1930 aerial photograph shows no mature trees or significant (sized) garden (elements) on site. It is not until the 1969 aerial photograph that any trees (an apple and a poplar, both still on site)(Webb, 2008, 29) are evident on the site, indicating that almost all vegetation is less than 40 years old (ibid, 17).

1979 A sketch of the site includes a picket fence and an entrance timber pergola, the original stone boundary fence to the east, and a water tank and small tree to the rear of the house (both now removed)(ibid, 20).

Pre-1988: eastern rubble brick wall patched (Webb, 2008, 17). The stone boundary wall between the house and Jellore Street is the only remnant of the early built elements in the landscape. This wall was reconstructed in 1988 using material from the original wall located along this fence line. To allow this wall to be read as a reconstructed element, it was constructed as a coarsed stone wall in contrast to the original random rubble wall that matched the house (ibid, 29).

1988-90 (Timmis ownership): Additions to the rear as outbuildings; modern picket fence to front elevation (LEP, 1990).
Early aerial photographs show a cluster of buildings on the site, including the original privvy, a garden shed and chook house. All these buildings were removed or reconstructed during the building works of 1988. The garden was also extensively renovated, with the northern garden sculpted into rolling mounds and planted to fast-growing native trees, including gums and wattles. New stone and brick paths were installed to link each of the new buildings, and fences erected to provide privacy between buildings (Webb, 2008, 29).

Refurbished original residence, re-roofed eastern section. NB: during refurbishment, the arrangement of the roof timbers indicated the original portion of the house was the western bedroom. The loungeroom and fireplace had been added later, followed by the eastern bedroom that had the inscripton '1888' engraved in one of the roof beams.

Two cottages/garage ('Dandenong' (Dandarbong' (ibid, 5), replacing an earlier garage* (ibid, 17) and 'Daphne' are the cottages) built on western side of the property to service the tourism industry. Daphne's materials included front facade stone sourced from the Sydney Museum.
*The original driveway swept in from Jellore Street to the garage, located to the north-west of the freestanding kitchen building. By the 2001 aerial photograph the driveway and car park had been realigned to occupy the area west of the house, with no driveway access to the rear of the property (ibid, 17).

Installation of recycled stone paving linking the two cottages, sourced from the Sydney Museum when it was undergoing renovations and reconstruction.
Various other paths and edging were added to the vegetable patch, the stone from the Sydney Museum source again. Construction of the timber shed directly behind the house from recycled materials. [New timber garage and reconstructed outdoor privvy (ibid, 5)].
Installation of the new driveway in its current form, and surfacing with crushed granite. A chook house has been removed, as well as the garage (removed to build Dandarbong (ibid, 17).

The outdoor privvy is evident in all the aerial photographs however during the 1988 building works it was rebuilt using recycled stone.

All other buildings on site were erected during the Timmis ownership from 1988-90. Paths, driveways, fences and paved areas were also added during this time. The new plantings on site, including the semi-mature trees, were added after the 1988 renovations (ibid, 20).

Elements in the garden installed since 1988 include:
- reconstruction of the picket fence along Jellore Street, entrance pergola and pedestrian gate;
- concrete path to front verandah and concrete paving under clothesline;
- the driveway and car park area surfaced with decomposed granite;
- a treated timber (pine) lattice fence installed separating the car park from the new buildings, a timber picket fence enclosing the clothes line to the north of the original kitchen and a post-and-rail fence to the north along the Wingecarribee River;
- stone retaining edge around the compost and vegetable garden using recycled blocks of sandstone;
- stone paths between the cottages using recycled blocks of sandstone sourced during building works at the Museum of Sydney;
- recycled clay bricks and paving creating the paths and paved areas between buildings;
- the wood shed (ibid, 29).

The garden and vegetation falls into two categories - exotic shrubs and small trees to the south and surrounding buildings, with northern rolling lawns planted with scattered native trees and shrubs. The lawns have been sculpted into several rolling mounds running north-south.

The garden is predominantly a modern installation (post 1969/1988) with only few trees displaying maturity, including an apple (Malus domestica cv.) north of Dandarbong cottage and a Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra 'Italica') on the western boundary north of Daphne cottage.

The gardens between the buildings and Jellore Street are typically cottage in style with use of lavender, apple blossom (Escallonia sp.) and Abelia grandiflora as hedges. Exotic trees and shrubs such as Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia), Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) and Iowa crabapple (Malus ioensis) provide seasonal interest and maintain the landscape character and connection to the Jellore Street-scape and the exotic Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) planting of the Market Square opposite.

There are no significant trees on site. The oldest trees are the apple and the poplar noted above. These appeared in aerial photographs between 1949 and 1969, making them between 40-60 years old. They are not considered significant due to age or rarity.

The original residence has limited connection to the river and views to the north, including Berrima Gaol, as it is heavily screened by maturing vegetation, including that of neighbouring properties. The additional buildings on site built in 1988 have almost completely obscured visibility to Wingecarribee River from the original building. The only window in the main residence with possible views to the river is the bathroom window. There are no windows to the north on the free-standing kitchen building.

Important views have been prioritised in the following list and identified in FIgure 10:
1. view of early colonial/Victorian colonial building from Market Square/Jellore Street;
2. view of the Coach and Horses Inn from Market Square in the context of the surrounding buildings of a similar period of development;
3. view of the building group from Market Square/ Jellore Street as a single unit;
4. views from the southern windows of the original residence across Market Square;
5. view to the river from the northern section of the garden and Dandarbong cottage;
6. view from the northern section of the garden to the Gaol;
7. view from across the river into the northern section of the garden (ibid, 29-30).
Current use: Tourist accommodation (bed and breakfast); residence
Former use: Inn and accomodation, residence

History

Historical notes: Berrima:
Berrima is the second oldest (European) settlement in tne Wingecarribee Shire and the oldest continuing settlement in the shire. The first town settlement in the district was in 1821 at Bong Bong, 8km south-east of Berrima on the Wingecarribee River (Webb, 2008, 9).

The site of Berrima was selected by Surveyor General Sir Thomas Mitchell in 1829 on a visit planning the route for a new road alignment from Sydney to replace the old Argyle Road, which had proven unsatisfactory due to a steep hill climb over the Mittagong Range and river crossing at Bong Bong. In 1830 Mitchell instructed Robert Hoddle to mark out the town based on a plan Mitchell's office prepared, along the lines of a traditional English village (with a central market place and as many blocks as possible facing onto the Wingecarribee River), and using the local Aboriginal name. The new line of road came through the town (Allman Johnston, 2007). Berrima was to be established as the commercial and administrative centre for the County of Camden.

Following the approval of Governor Bourke in 1831, the period 1824 to 1841 saw significant flourishing development as mail coaches changed their route to this new line of road.

Early town lots were sold in 1833, predominantly to inn keepers and around Market Square, including the first town lot sales to Bryan McMahon (Webb, 2008, 9).

(Royal) Mail Coach Inn (now trading as the 'Coach & Horses Inn'), 24 Jellore Street:
The (subject, i.e. 24 Jellore St.) property forms part of this first town land sale.

The property (Lot 1 Section 2) was originally sold to Bryan McMahon (occasionally recorded as MacMahon) in 3/1833,
in conjunction with the neighbouring property (Lot 2 Section 2)[which is the subject property - 24 Jellore Street - which is now trading as the 'Coach & Horses Inn'] containing the Berrima Inn, also known as McMahon's Inn.
Both lots are at the eastern corner of Bryan and Jellore Streets (Webb, 2008, 5, 10).

Bryan McMahon was an innkeeper of Sutton Forest (Allman Johnston, 2007). The neighbouring property, Lot 3 Section 2, was sold in 12/1834 to Michael Doyle, a condition of sale requiring a 'dwelling house, store or other permanent structure to be built on the land to a value of (pounds) 20 or more within 2 years of purchase' (Webb, 2008, 10).

The earliest building on the property (Lot 2 Section 2) operated under the sign of the (Royal) Mail Coach Inn, from 1837-9, as a licensed public house and staging post for travel and delivery of mail. This was one of the first inns to operate in Berrima, along with the Surveyor-General Inn and the Berrima Inn (next door on Lot 1 Section 2). The licencee, Michael Doyle, transferred the (Royal) Mail Coach Inn's liquor licence to the opposite side of Market Square in 1839 to operate from the property he and his wife had purchased, which is now known as the White Horse Inn.

The current name of this property is misleading. Research has revealed that the Coach & Horses Inn never operated from this site. The original (Coach & Horses Inn) licence, granted to Lewis Levy in 1856, was located on the corner of Oxley Street and Argyle Street (the Old Hume Highway), a building now known as Bramber Cottage (Webb, 2008, 5).

The land was sold to John Ireland in 7/1837. The same month Doyle was granted a liquor licence for the Mail Coach Inn (on Lot 2 Section 2) in Jellore Street. The first inn to be licensed in Berrima was granted in 7/1834 to Bryan McMahon for the Berrima Inn, on Lot 1 Section 2. The last liquor licence for Berrima Inn was issued in 1848, two years before McMahon died. The 1841 Census included an entry by McMahon (no.37) listing a brick and stone building that was completed and unoccupied. The return provides no identification for the property's location, however the only other town allotment owned by McMahon (apart from the Berrima Inn lot) at this time appears to be Lot 2 Section 2, currently known as the Coach & Horses Inn (Webb, 2008, 10-11). It is understood that the Coach & Horses Inn was constructed by a Mr Matthews, builder, during MacMahon's ownership. The building operated as a coaching inn and accommodation house during its early years (Allman Johnston, 2007).

Since 1839 when the (Royal) Mail Coach Inn liquor licence was transferred, the Coach & Horses Inn property has been maintained as a private residence (Webb, 2008, 15).

Governor Bourke designated Berrima as a place for a courthouse and gaol to serve the southern part of the state (Webb, 2008, 9). With construction of the Berrima Jail from 1835-9 and its Court House in 1838 to serve the southern part of the state the town flourished into the 1840s as mail coaches called, public buildings including churches in 1849 and 1851, establishment of many hotels and coaching houses to service local resident needs and passing trades, persons and commercial travellers. Its 1841 population was 249 with 37 houses completed and 7 more in construction (Allman Johnston, 2007).

By the 1840s there were four licensed premises including the Berrima Inn, Surveyor General Inn, Mail Coach Inn and Crown Inn. Prior to the coming of the railway to the Moss Vale area, there were 13 hotels in Berrima. The first licensed inn for Berrima was the Berrima Inn, operated by Bryan McMahon, in 1834. Seven of the early hotel buildings remain today with the oldest (surviving) being the Surveyor General Inn, its first licence granted to James Harper on 29/6/1835. The Breen family, who later bought McMahon's Inn and the Coach & Horses Inn (unlicensed), were involved with two other hotels, the Taylor's Crown Inn (1834) and the Commercial Hotel. Other inns of historic note include the White Horse Inn and the Queen Victoria Inn (Webb, 2008, 9).
Research has indicated there were some 13 hotels or grog houses in Berrima at the one time in the early days (Allman Johnston, 2007).

Bryan & his wife Winifred McMahon mortgaged Lot 2 Section 2 to William Morrice of Comfort Hill in 4/1850, two days before Bryan died. In 1841 Morrice had taken up the half share of this brother John's grant from Reverend Doctor J.D.Lang, where he built Comfort Hill (farm homestead). This house was regarded as a twin house to 'Eling Forest' opposite on the Great South Road (now the Hume Highway)(Webb, 2008, 11).

The 1851 census showed the number of buildings remained the same but the population had dropped to 192. During the 1850s Berrima experienced another boom period after the discovery of gold. When the Great Southern Railway bypassed Berrima in 1867 the town again began to decline as Mittagong, Moss Vale and Bowral developed. Berrima remained virtually unchanged for the next 100 years, preserving the town as an almost intact colonial village (Webb, 2008, 10).

Bryan Patrick McMahon (son of Bryan) had inherited Lots 1 & 2 Section 2 and in 1862 sold both lots containing the original Berrima Inn and the stone and brick building to Francis Breen (Webb, 2008, 11). Governor Bourke executed the inn's land grant in 1862, transferring it to Francis Breen, innkeeper. Breen was already a previous innkeeper having owned Breen's Commercial Hotel in Berrima in 1840 (Allman Johnston, 2007, 13)(since renamed the Colonial Inn, the Old Breen's restaurant and currently named 'Eschalots' restaurant)(Webb, 2008, 11).

In 1863 a map of Berrima noted the property was in the possession of B. MacMahon (Allman Johnston, 2007). The will of Francis Breen, executed by the Supreme Court in 1870, bequeathed 'the house and premises known as McMahon's house situated in Market Square' to his brother Edward Breen.

In 1885 Edward sold it to Sutton Forest farmer John Sewell Sr. and in 1887 he sold it to Percy Hiram Matthews, a clerk of Berrima. In October 1947 Matthews, described as a retired bank officer, sold it to Mrs Nellie Clinton, wife of Joseph Erin Clinton, Berrima State Works secretary. Three months later Joseph Clinton died in Moss Vale and was buried in Berrima cemetery.

In 1888 an eastern extension was added to the Coach & Horses inn residence, with a Victorian bay window facing Jellore Street. A new extension at the residence's rear forms the house's kitchen and bathroom (Webb, 2008, 20, 22).

In 1948 the Berrima Training Centre, a minimum security correctional centre opened at the Berrima Gaol. In the 1960s the National Trust of Australia (NSW) started to classify and seek to protect heritage properties (Webb, 2008, 22).

Nelly Clinton continued to live in the house until shortly before her death in 1970, with her son Joseph Basil Clinton and family living next door at the old Berrima Inn. In 1969 Nellie Clinton sold the property to Robert Glenn, a truck driver of Colo Vale. It was sold to Brian Thomas Timmis, a builder from Loftus, in 1988. During the ownership of Timmis, three new buildings were built on the site. Photographs of the property in a 'For Sale' advertisement show all buildings now on site were there in 1989. The advertisement notes the property had been recently restored and was operating as a commercial venture for accommodation (Allman Johnston, 2007; corrected by Webb, 2008, 12-13).

Since the classification of a number of buildings in Berrima by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) in the 1960s, the popularity of Berrima has increased, particularly as a tourist destination. Recent developments in the town have seen the emergence of bed and breakfast accommodation facilities, reflecting the early years of the town's development that provided accommodation for travellers through the construction and operation of various inns (Webb, 2008, 10). The Coach & Horses Inn property developed into use as a commercial residential business as a bed and breakfast operation in the late 1980s during the ownership of Brian Timmis (Webb, 2008, 15).

In June 1988 its title was converted by the then Land Titles Office to the now Lot 1 DP 780565.

The property was renamed 'Coach & Horses Inn' in the 1980s by the developer who was restoring it. This name has no history on this site - the original Coach & Horses Inn, licensed to Lewis Levy, was on Argyle Street (the former Hume Highway), not on Jellore Street (Charlotte Webb, pers.comm., 14/1/2014).

In 1990 the property was transferred to Lesley Bensley, a receptionist of Burradoo. In 1992 the Sydney to Canberra Freeway (F5) bypassed Berrima (Webb, 2008, 22).

In 7/2002 it was sold to the present owners David and Wendy Paley (Allman Johnston, 2007, 36).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Innkeeping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining public roads-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Coaching Inns along roads-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating travellers and tourists-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Vernacular towns serving a specific industry-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing civic infrastructure and amenity-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the pub-

Recommended management:

Berrima Conservation Study,1979: Recommend continued contribution to Jellore Street group of historic buildings.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0010202 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0010216 Jan 81 0080326
Local Environmental Plan  06 Jan 88   
Local Environmental Plan  12 Jan 90 7291
National Trust of Australia register Coach & Horses Inn Former144511 Feb 74   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Wingecarribee Heritage Survey1991WI0133JRC Planning ServicesJocelyn Colleran No
National Trust Country Register 1445National Trust of Austalia (NSW)  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAllman Johnston Architects2007Statement of Heritage Impact - Coach & Horses Inn (strata title subdivision)
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Coach & Horses Inn View detail
WrittenChris and Charlotte Webb P/L2009Conservation Management Plan: Coach & Horses Inn, 24 Jellore Street, Berrima
WrittenOwner2008Attraction Website www.coachandhorses.com.au View detail
TourismTourism NSW2007Coach And Horses Inn View detail

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The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045166
File number: H07/00117/1 S90/03604 HC 32521


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