Kelvin | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Kelvin

Item details

Name of item: Kelvin
Other name/s: Kelvin Park Group, The Retreat, Thomas Laycock's Cottage Vale, Cottage-ville
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -33.9200067083 Long: 150.7385472520
Primary address: 30 The Retreat, Bringelly, NSW 2171
Parish: Bringelly
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Liverpool
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Gandangara
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT2711 DP1128906
LOT2712 DP1128906
LOT2713 DP1128906
LOT271 DP803167
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
30 The RetreatBringellyLiverpoolBringellyCumberlandPrimary Address
Bringelly RoadBringellyLiverpoolBringellyCumberlandAlternate Address
30 The RetreatBringellyLiverpoolBringellyCumberlandAlternate Address
30 The RetreatBringellyLiverpoolBringellyCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
FORM architects (aust) pty ltdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

Kelvin Park, formerly known as Cottage-ville or Retreat Farm, is able to demonstrate the pastoral development of Bringelly from 1818. Although there is only a remnant (9.784 ha) of the original 1200 acre site (486ha), the homestead and farm buildings in their current setting with extensive views over rural land, is still able to demonstrate the principles of 19th century farm estate architecture, planning and design.

Kelvin Park is significant for its association with a number of people and organisations of importance in NSW's cultural history, including Thomas Laycock Junior who established the farm at Bringelly, and later owners, John Thomas Campbell and Alfred Kennerley. The lease of the property by the Australian Agricultural Company, the country's oldest agricultural and pastoral development company established in 1824, is of particular significance.

The homestead at Kelvin Park retains its colonial Georgian single-storey form and planning and is representative of a gentleman's rural residence of the 1820s. Despite some modifications it retains the architectural elements and character that make it a good example of its type. The kitchen wing and servants' quarters are modest examples of early colonial Georgian style architecture but similarly retain their original form and planning. All of these buildings are evidence of the establishment of a home and farm by Thomas Laycock.

The brick coach house at Kelvin Park retains its picturesque, early Victorian form, planning and much of its original detailing. It is evidence of the development of the property in the 1850s by Alfred Kennerley, who later became Premier of Tasmania.

The two slab barns are evidence of Kelvin Park as a working farm from 1818 until, at least, the mid-20th century. The structures demonstrate 19th century building methods and farm practice.

The buildings at Kelvin Park belong to an important and rare group of colonial Georgian and early Victorian farm buildings that contribute to the historic rural landscape. They are evidence of continuity of land use for farming for 187 years (to 2005).

The form of, and elements within, the garden, courtyard areas and entry to the property are evidence of the planning of the homestead complex by Laycock and subsequent owners and express the status they hoped to convey.

The homestead of Kelvin Park retains important historic views to the east to Thompson's Creek and beyond to South Creek. The site also retains views of other historically related rural landscapes beyond the current boundaries such as the pasture and stands of trees to the north. Both views contribute to the site's significance and maintain the context of the homestead group.

Kelvin Park group, including the homestead complex and remnant of farmland is significant at local, regional, state and national levels. All areas of the site are considered equally significant. (FORM Architects, 12/2006, slightly modified, Read, S., 12/2006)
NB: neither the above nor below statements address the archaeological potential of the site).

The Kelvin Park site landscaping is a significant component of the Kelvin Park group. The early numerous tree plantings contribute to making the site a notable landmark in the area. The remaining details of driveways, fencing and entrances also contribute to the historic and social evidence provided by the site of its original patterns of occupation and use. The site is part of an intact early 19th century farm complex that is now rare within the wider urbanised environs of Liverpool. There is the potential to gain more information on the site from further archaeological and documentary research. (LEP listing/landscape).

The setting of the house on a knoll above a creek, its remnant layout of early buildings and garden, and its fine, mature trees, particularly its variety of old pines, add greatly to the character and significance of the property. The garden and setting are considered to have regional significance (Perumal Murphy Wu, 1990)

Built by Thomas Laycock junior, 1820, having received the Bringelly grant in 1818. He returned to Australia in 1817 after fighting for England in the American War of 1812. An early house of quality and rich historical associations being one of the charming country houses of the 1820s. It is well sited above Thompson's Creek and is surrounded by a beautifully landscaped garden. (AHC, 1998)
Date significance updated: 11 Jan 05
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: Thomas Laycock
Construction years: 1820-1826
Physical description: Setting
The main building group of Kelvin Park is sited on a low hill with a good outlook to the west of and above Thompsons Creek, and is set in a well maintained but largely modern garden with a number of important early trees. A circular driveway in front of the house around the base of a large fig (Ficus sp.) tree is a remnant of the original/early carriage loop but appears to be no longer used for vehicular traffic. At the entrance to the homestead are remnants of an old/earlier garden and over the water tank stand is a old climbing rose. The major early trees around the house and outbuildings group include a hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii), 3 camphor laurels (Cinnamomum camphora)(2 flanking the front door), and the fig (Ficus sp.) that forms a centre-piece in the driveway loop.

Many of the original early plantings have been removed over time and there has been a major garden refurbishment since the 1970s. A modern swimming pool has been installed in the front garden.

The remnants of the early layout include part of an ironstone gravel drive, fine lawns, the gravelled forecourt to the stables behind (west) of the house and large old trees. The trees of most heritage value are considered to be the two pines which include hoop pines (Araucaria cunninghamii), brown pine (Podocarpus elatus), Canary Island? pine (Pinus canariensis), and Monterey pines (P.radiata). Two large camphor laurels (Cinnamomum camphora) flank the view from the front door, in the carriage loop.

Other notable elements of the garden include cypress, old olive trees (Olea sp.), Cape plumbago bushes (Plumbago capensis), a large lemon-scented gum (Corymbia citriodora), the fine hedge (Campsis sp.) between house and stable forecourt, and the creeping fig (Ficus pumila) covering the walls of the stables.

More recently (1990) planted trees (mostly appropriate) include English elm (Ulmus procera), Monterey pines, silky oak (Grevillea robusta), Chinese elm (U.parvifolia), pistachio (Pistacia chinensis), Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra 'Italica'), oleander (Nerium oleander) and jacaranda (J.mimosifolia).

A post and rail fence (plus wire netting) around the buildings and garden seems suitable and includes older gates and fence posts. There is a well sited tennis court with sympathetic timber posts and netting surround, though the concrete block hit-up is inappropriate (material).

The main homestead garden is enclosed with a timber and wire mesh fence. A wide and relatively old timber gate gives access to this enclosed area from the north. The present vehicular approach to the site terminates in the rear service courtyard and the entrance to this is marked by a pair of (early) half-round topped timber post with more modern timber rail fencing. (LEP listing/landscape, modified Read, S., 2006).

A remnant core of a farm complex including homestead, outbuildings, garden including plantings and paddocks. Its current entry drive orientation (from the south, south-west and south-east) dates from a c1990 subdivision which created a new road in from the south-east, called The Retreat. The original estate access up until then was from the east over Thompson's Creek, approaching the house from the north-east then north. (Read, S., 2005)

Kelvin Park Group consists of:
- the homestead, an early Colonial Georgian, single storey, stuccoed brick bungalow with hipped, iron roof;
- the kitchen (possible the former homestead), a detached, single storey Early Colonial Georgian style bungalow to the west of the main homestead;
- the Servants' or Maids' quarters, and dairy;
- the Coach House, a one and a half storey sandstock brick Early Victorian style building with a loft, also used as a stables and a lock up;
- two slab timber sheds;
- landscape features, including gardens, trees, driveways and fences;
- late 20th century farm buildings and structures, stabling, sheds and yards;
- various relics and other works including a cellar, cistern, early tank and tank stand and horse sweep;
- the site's potential archaeological resources
(Form, 2005, modified Read, S., 7/2005)

A stuccoed single storey Georgian farmhouse. Hipped iron roof, cranked in vernacular fashion over wide high verandah on three sides. This is paved with sandstone. The roof supported on heavily chamfered timber posts and with an exceptionally finely scalloped timber valance board. Shuttered windows. Front door has beautiful elliptical fanlight over it. Exceptional cedar joinery inside. At rear is sandstock brick kitchen, dairy, offices, small carriage house at rear. (AHC, 1998)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good, high archaeological potential (LEP listing/landscape).
Date condition updated:17 Mar 06
Modifications and dates: 1818 1200 acres (486 hectares) Laycock, and from 1824 Campbell)
1825 AA company extends the house and builds housing for their workers and families with convict labour
1833+ Kennerley adds numerous outbuildings
c1896 part of land resumed for development of urban infrastructure including roads, school and post office necessary for establishing the village of Bringelly (in Kelvin's south-west corner)
1896 land in southern boundary of farm resumed by Minister for Public Works to build Bringelly Road, and at farm's south-west corner, for the Northern Road and a school (which was operating by 1897). Residue of the farm was over 1187 acres (480ha).

1911 Charles Tyson renamed the farm "Kelvin".
c1942-5 Commonwealth Government leased the farm for use as a "Dispersal Aerodrome" for the RAAF, stock were removed and areas fenced off. ALterations to buildings were made to accomodate RAAF requirements during the war. Substantial amounts of timber on the property were felled (some to clear flight approaches to the airstrip), some used for construction purposes. When deemed no longer necessary, negotiations ensued to remove redundant items. Gravel surfaces, hiedouts and many other items were left in situ. A few pieces of equipment were salvaged or disposed of.

1950-60 portions (to the west and north of the homestead group) were transferred to the Commonwealth and Overseas Telecommunications Commission (OTC). A strip of land was retained, maintaining access between Kelvin Park and Badgery's Creek Road to the west. (NB: traditional farm access was from the east across Thompson's Creek, slightly north of the homestead). Property reduced to approximately 970 acres.

1972 Medich family bought the property, by then of about 250 acres.

1985 Kelvin (360 hectares) was subdivided into 2 hectare (5 acre) lots, creating a new road (Kelvin Park Drive) connecting the homestead complex, between Thompson's Creek and South Creek, to Bringelly Road in the south. 25 smaller building allotments facing Bringelly Road were also formed.

In 1990 Kelvin Park was further subdivided into six allotments, isolating the homestead group on a substantially smaller allotment of less than 10 hectares, accessed by the (new) Retreat Road. Lot 26 to the east of Thompson's Creek was also subdivided into residential allotments. (Form Architects, CMP Addenda, 2005)

Its current entry drive orientation (from the south, south-west and south-east) dates from a c1990 subdivision which created a new road in from the south-east, called The Retreat. The original estate access up until then was from the east over Thompson's Creek, approaching the house from the north-east then north. (Read, S., 2005)

During field inspections for the Heritage Study Review undertaken in 2004 it was noted that the gardens and setting in the immediate environs of the group has undergone some changes since 1992. Photographic records indicate that some vegetation to the rear of the house has been removed. According to the present landowner general garden maintenance was conducted at the site over the last few years. In addition the wider setting of the site is being encroached upon by residential development. Nonetheless some of earlier mature trees remain, including the fig that forms a centre-piece in the driveway loop. The fencing and various entracne gates described in 1992 are still intact (LEP listing/landscape, 2004).
Further information: Kelvin Park Estate has historic connections with Collingwood Estate, Liverpool & Fernleigh, Sutherland.
Current use: domestic residence, horse agistment
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, pastoral grazing, agistment, horse stud, dispersal aerodrome

History

Historical notes: Traditional owners of this country (now part of Liverpool Local Government Area) were Cabrogal (Cahbrogal) clan (land around Liverpool), the Murigong (Muringong) clan (land at the Cowpastures), the Warmuli (land around Prospect) and the Gomerigal people (land around South Creek). Bringelly is an Aboriginal name, one of only two in the Liverpool district.

Kelvin Park estate's history is bound up with several grants of land including those of 600 acres to Thomas Laycock Jr. (soldier, explorer, businessman, farmer)(Portion 22, 600 acres, granted 26/11/1818), Penelope Lucas (Governess to John & Elizabeth Macarthur's family, Parramatta)(Portion 23, 500 acres, 26/11/1818), William Hutchinson (Portion 17, 700 acres, 30/6/1823), Edmund Wright (Portion 16, 350 acres, 5/4/1821), and Charles Reid (Portion 21, 600 acres, 26/11/1818).

Thomas Laycock Junior is believed by Sutherland historians to have, by 1821, had constructed the house 'Fernleigh', at Caringbah South on Burraneer Bay, while mostly resident at 'Kelvin'. He built Fernleigh for his second wife Margaret Connell and the six children of his first marriage to Isabella Bunker of 'Collingwood', Liverpool. Fernleigh is believed to be the first constructed in the Sutherland area and has been an envied point of interest for 100 years.

Kelvin is thus associated with historic property Collingwood in Liverpool and that of Fernleigh in Sutherland, through owner Laycock Junior's estates and two wives.

1824: Laycock's 1200 acre "Retreat Farm" was sold to Edward Riley, and resold within a month to Provost Marshall John Thomas Campbell (Governor Macquarie's secretary prior to 1819), who tried again to sell it (Form Architects, 2005).

Historian Dr Carol Liston (2010) notes that Laycock Junior's South Creek estate was known as "Cottage Vale", later called "The Retreat", and "Kelvin". She adds that Campbell was a successful farmer and pastoralist, breeding cattle and horses and in 1826 was a member of the NSW Land Board, responsible for assessing the resources of prospective settlers who applied for land grants. Campbell died in 1830 (Liston, 2010, 6).

A lease was given to the Board of Directors of the newly formed Australian Agricultural (AA) Company in early 1825 to accomodate its newly appointed Director, Robert Dawson and the large party of workers and flock of merino sheep who'd accompanied him to the colony (Campbell was a shareholder in the AA Company). The Company was formed in 1824 to 'extend and improve the flocks of merino sheep' in NSW (Form Architects, 2005).

In 1824, London was in the midst of an enormous stock market boom. With Australian wool becoming increasingly important, two companies - the Australian Agricultural Company (AACo.) and the Van Diemen's Land Company - were floated on the London Stock Exchange to promote raising fine-wooled sheep in the Australian colonies. The AACo. became a major force in the Australian coal and pastoral industries and in the settlement and development of the Hunter River and Port Stephens regions. Today, listed on the Australian Stock Exchange, it is the oldest Australian company operating under its original name.

Founded by a special Act of Parliament and under Royal Charter, it acquired the right to hold and sell land in New South Wales. Its founding members were a group of British bankers, merchants and politicians who saw the potential for big profits to be made in the colony.

The terms of the charter were that most labour would be provided by convicts under supervision of superintendents, overseers and skilled mechanics sent from England. If, at the end of 15 years, the company had expended 10,000 pounds on improvements and employed 1400 convicts, it would gain freehold title to its land. The size of the grant was not specified in the charter, but discussions between company directors and the Colonial Office settled on one million acres.

The company appointed a chief agent, Robert Dawson and a Colonial Committee to assist him. This eventually included just three people - James Macarthur (fourth son of John Macarthur), his cousin Hannibal and brother-in-law, Principal Surgeon, James Bowman. The committee took a four year lease of 'The Retreat' (later 'Kelvin') at Bringelly near Camden for the immediate accommodation of imported stock, and sought advice on the best location for the land grant.

In June 1825 Dawson sailed from the Isle of Wight with 27 employees, wives and families, 800 French and Anglo merino sheep, 8 cattle and 6 horses. They were followed a few weeks later by an overseer, 6 shepherds and further 79 French merinos.

In January 1826, when people and stock were settled, Dawson sailed to Newcastle with a small party on the "Liverpool Packet" and from there, travelled across country to inspect Port Stephens, an area which, of all those suggested, had the great advantage of access by water (Pemberton, 2009, 57-58).

Temporary huts were added to the house on the farm to accomodate the worker families. Within two months he moved most of the party to Carrington, near Port Stephens, but the Company continued to use the Retreat Farm for stock agistment. Imported thoroghbred and Cleveland stallions were stood at stud at Retreat Farm in 1826. Sheep were sent to it in 1827 with German shepherds. The farm continued to be leased to the AA Company from 1826-c1828-30.

In 1831 Campbell's brother Reverend C.Campbell, heir to the estate on John's death, let the farm for a year, and in 1832 approved its auction. In 1833 The Hon. Alfred Kennerley (Premier, landholder, philanthropist) bought it, using it as a base for stock agistment and operating his other properties at Parramatta and Mudgee. He returned to England in 1842 and in 1845 sold his stock and leased his land holdings. Liston (2010) notes that Kennerley sold blood stock, such as 'Young Admiral'.

He (Kennerley) is thought to have actively farmed "Retreat Farm". In 1853 he sold the farm to David Bell. In 1857 and again in 1862 it was mortgaged to Rowland Hassall. Bell was insolvent in 1864 and 1325 acres (including part of Lucas' grant to the north) were sold to Frederick Borton. About this time a store and dwelling known as the Bringelly Post Office and a public pound and blacksmith's shop had been built on the extreme (southwestern) boundary of the estate, and the junction of Bringelly, Penrith, Camden and Greendale Roads. In 1869 William Pearce of Seven Hills bought the farm, and 1872 records show he lived there, as well as farmer Frank Horsey.

In 1896 land on "The Retreat"s southern boundary was resumed to build Bringelly Road and at its southwest corner for the Northern Road and a school, which was operating in 1897. Bringelly village grew up around the school and post office. The Retreat, post resumption, was c.1187 acres (480ha). In 1901 the property title was transferred to Pearce's wife Elizabeth Charlotte, and it was subsequently sold. The Pearce family owned The Retreat more than 30 years, the longest period of tenure in its history to that date.

In May 1901 George Albert Church, grazier of Campelltown bought The Retreat, and, heavily mortgaged, it was sold in 1911 to Arthur Owen Ryder, gentleman of North Sydney, who sold it within months to Charles Tyson of Aberdeen, grazier, who renamed it "Kelvin". The farm may have been attractive due to its proximity to abbattoirs, four of which were in Liverpool in 1912, and for agistment of cattle prior to sale or slaughter.

In March 1914 Philip Staughton, grazier of Dalappol, Narrandera bought Kelvin. In October added to the land by buying lots 12-17 of Section 4, part of the subdivision of Hutchinson's former grant. This gave Kelvin access to Clyde Road to the east, later known as Badgery's Creek Road.

In 1918 Hugh Peter MacDonald, grazier of Yandra, Nimmitabel, bought Kelvin, transferring title to Lorna Jessie MacDonald, spinster, in 1921. Later records indicate that sheep were grazed on the property.

Willoughby Dowling (c1881-1941), a grazier from Mudgee, leased Kelvin in 1939 while he was building a new home at Bringelly nearby (which he named 'Loowee' after his father's farm, 'Lue', near Mudgee (Casey & Lowe, 2018, 10).

From 19 March 1942 to 28 February 1945 370 acres of the 1320 acre property was leased by Lorna MacDonald to the Commonwealth Government, converted for use as a 'Dispersal Aerodrome', for National Security Regulations by the RAAF. During this time it was owner-operated as a holding area for sheep marketing, wool growing and fattening, having a well improved grazing area with all necessary buildings. The Commonwealth's interest in Kelvin was influenced by a flat area along South Creek suitable as an airstrip. Similar defence positions at Penrith were a response to war in the Pacific and Australia's preparations for conflict.

The Dispersal area was never used and in 1944 the owner was able to resume use of part of the land for grazing, however lease of the airstrip and buildings was maintained. When it was deemed that the site was no longer of use to the war effort negotiations began to remove redundant items. Gravel surfaces, hideouts and many other items were left in situ. A few pieces of equipment were salvaged and disposed of. Compensation was made for fence repairs and estimates made for work to restore the buildings.

In 1954 the National Trust (NSW) led by Ward & Olive Havard visited Kelvin. Between 1950 and September 1960 portions of Kelvin were transferred to the Commonwealth of Australia (Lots 13 & 14 DP 2650 & part Portions 21 & 22 FP 90328) and the Oveseas Telecommunications Commission (Lots 15-17 Sec 4 DP2650). A strip of land (part of Lot 12) was retained, maintaining access between the residue of Kelvin and Badgery's Creek Road to the west. (NB: traditional access was from the east across Thompson's Creek, slightly north of the homestead). By 1960 Kelvin was approximately 970 acres.

When bought by the Medich family in 1982, Kelvin was of the order of 250 acres.

Kelvin was again subdivided in 1985, creating a new road (Kelvin Park Drive) connecting the homestead complex (Lot 27) and Lot 26, between Thompson's Creek and South Creek, to Bringelly Road (to the south). 25 smaller building allotments facing Bringelly Road were also formed (Lots 1-25 (LPI DP 712840)).

In 1990 Kelvin Park was further subdivided into 6 allotments, isolating the homestead and farm buildings on a substantially smaller allotment of less than 10 hectares (Lot 271), accessed by The Retreat Road. Lot 26 east of Thompson's Creek was also subdivided into residential allotments (Form Architects, 2005).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. German migrants-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming with convict labour-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Marking the transition from pastoralism to agriculture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming wheat and other grains-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Orcharding-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Associations with the Australian Agricultural Company, estd.1824-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Horse breeding and raising-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for lamb and mutton-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use cattle-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Livestock structures-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating workers in workers' housing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Providing telecommunications facilities-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working independently on the land-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Involvement with the Second World War-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Air force or defence aviation uses-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating telecommunications-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - colonial period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Riley, sheep breeder and grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Bowman, principal colonial surgeon-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Thomas Campbell, politician, vice regal secretary, land owner-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Alfred Kennerley, Premier, landholder, philanthropist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Penelope Lucas, governess, companion to the Macarthur family-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Laycock Jr., soldier, explorer, businessman, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Robert Dawson, Director Australian Agricultural Company, pioneer pastoral and agricultural company-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Hannibal Macarthur, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Macarthur, pastoralist and entrepreneur-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Rev. C. Campbell, priest, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with David Bell, farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Frederick Borton, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William and Elizabeth Pearce, graziers-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Frank Horsey, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with G.A.Church, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Arthur Ryder, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Charles Tyson, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Phillip Staughton, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Hugh McDonald, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Lorna McDonald, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Willoughby Downing, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Ron Medich, entrepreneur and family-

Recommended management:

A Conservation Management Plan should be prepared to guide the ongoing management and maintenance Kelvin Park. If any changes, alteration, subdivision or redevelopment of the site, including any of the structures located within the Kelvin Park Homestead Group or the landscape are proposed, then a Statement of Heritage Impact should be prepared to assess the impact of such proposal on the significance of the site as a whole. If an updated CMP has not been prepared when such alterations or changes are proposed a CMP should be prepared prior to the preparation of the Statement of Heritage Impact. An archaeological assessment should be undertaken and included in the CMP and the Statement of Heritage Impact should also consider the impact of the proposal on the archaeological record (LEP listing/landscape).

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act general and garden maintenance.
Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site, where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material.
(2) Garden maintenance, including cultivation, pruning, tree surgery, weed control and the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls.
Nov 7 1986
39Minister makes heritage agreementHeritage Agreement signed by Minister. Heritage Act over subdivision approval Nov 1 2006
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCompliance with conditions: amended CMP submitted for Heritage Office approval Approved final CMP as Appendix D to a final Heritage Agreement which was signed by the Minister and conveyed to the applicant in a letter dated 21/12/06 Dec 21 2006
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0004602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0004619 Jul 85 1053661
Local Environmental PlanKelvin Park Group off Kelvin Park Drive25203 Feb 95 11 
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67Kelvin Park    
National Trust of Australia register Kelvin etc/The Retreat8643   
Register of the National EstateKelvin, Outbuildings & Curtilage329821 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCasey & Lowe Archaeology & Heritage2018'Birling', The Northern Road, Bringelly - Historical Research post-1935
Management PlanForm architects2005Kelvin Park The Retreat, Bringelly : Proposed subdivision proposed restoration and addition, concept subdivision plan, conservation management plan, heritage impact assessment.
WrittenForm Architects2005Addenda to Conservation Management Plan Kelvin Park, The Retreat, Bringelly
WrittenForm Architects P/L2006Kelvin Park The Retreat Bringelly: Proposed Subdivision, Proposed Restoration & Addition, Concept Subdivision Plan, Conservation Management Plan, Heritage Impact Assessment, Heritage Agreement, Revision D
WrittenFORM Architects P/L2006Conservation Management Plan - Kelvin Park, The Retreat, Bringelly
WrittenKingston, Daphne1990Early Colonial Homes of the Sydney Region 1788-1838
WrittenListon, Carol2010Bellfield and Rossmore: forgotten associations from Thomas Shepherd to Hardy Wilson"
WrittenPemberton, Pennie, Dr.2009The Australian Agricultural Company: Pioneers of Wealth
WrittenPerumal Murphy Wu1990South Creek Valley Heritage Study, Kelvin setting & garden entry L2
WrittenRoxburgh, Rachel & Baglin, Douglass1974Early Colonial Houses of New South Wales (Kelvin section)

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045191
File number: 13/7264; S90/06212 & HC 32054


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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