Horningsea Park | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Horningsea Park

Item details

Name of item: Horningsea Park
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.9485039172 Long: 150.8462215730
Primary address: Camden Valley Way, Horningsea Park, NSW 2171
Parish: Cabramatta
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Liverpool
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Gandangara
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT28 DP871600
LOT34 DP871600
LOT200 DP874806
LOT208 DP874806
LOT209 DP874806
LOT210 DP874806
LOT226 DP874806
LOT227 DP874806
LOT230 DP874806
LOT301 DP877452
LOT302 DP877452
LOT303 DP877452
LOT304 DP877452
LOT305 DP877452
LOT306 DP877452
LOT307 DP877452
LOT308 DP877452
LOT309 DP877452
LOT310 DP877452
LOT311 DP877452
LOT312 DP877452
LOT313 DP877452
LOT314 DP877452
LOT315 DP877452
LOT316 DP877452
LOT317 DP877452
LOT318 DP877452
LOT319 DP877452
LOT320 DP877452
LOT321 DP879012
LOT322 DP879012
LOT323 DP879012
LOT324 DP879012
LOT325 DP879012
LOT326 DP879012
LOT327 DP879012
LOT328 DP879012
LOT329 DP879012
LOT330 DP879012
LOT331 DP879012
LOT331 DP879971
LOT332 DP879971
LOT333 DP879971
LOT334 DP879971
LOT335 DP879971
LOT336 DP879971
LOT337 DP879971
LOT338 DP879971
LOT339 DP879971
LOT340 DP879971
LOT341 DP879971
LOT342 DP879971
LOT343 DP879971
LOT344 DP879971
LOT345 DP879971
LOT346 DP879971
LOT347 DP879971
LOT348 DP879971
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Twynam DriveHorningsea ParkLiverpool   
Horningsea Park DriveHorningsea ParkLiverpool   
Camden Valley WayHorningsea ParkLiverpoolCabramattaCumberlandPrimary Address
Camden Valley WayEdmondson ParkLiverpoolCabramattaCumberlandAlternate Address
Horningsea Park DriveHorningsea ParkLiverpool  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 
Liverpool City CouncilLocal Government 

Statement of significance:

The intact survival of Horningsea Park for so long as a large rural entity is significant testimony to its viability as a pastoral and dairying assemblage. In relation to its setting within the estate the house retains an ability to demonstrate socially and historically significant concepts about Australian colonial and post-colonial life. The place has strong links with early exploration beyond the Cumberland Plain, as well as with the early movement of the Australian economy from an agricultural to a pastoral base (Keating 1995). A fine early Georgian homestead, with visual evidence of its former estate and surrounded by trees some of which are from the original garden. (Heritage Office)
Date significance updated: 08 Apr 98
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Joshua John Moore
Construction years: 1830-1839
Physical description: Estate:
c9000 square meters of land (Colin Israel, 2012, 5).
The house is set in the modified remains of its former rural estate, still retaining the long entrance driveway from the Hume Highway (now renamed Camden Valley Way). Subdivision and encroachment by a new suburb of 'Horningsea Park' has much-changed the setting of the house and its garden and former home paddocks.

The house sits on a slightly elevated land with views to the local area, particularly to the south from its main entry, as views in other directions are restricted by recent housing development and existing vegetation. Its location dates back to the original colonial settlement of the district, the site chosen to give a good vantage point over surrounding land (Colin Israel, 2012, 5).

A direct axial approach and view from Camden Valley Way aligns with the house's front elevation and door.
This original access driveway has been zoned as public recreation space, retaining its open character and views, although the house is now accessed via Horningsea Park Drive.

Garden/grounds:
Beautifully landsacped 9089 square meter block. Salt water swimming pool behind the house's southern rear wing, with paved surrounds. Gas-heated spa pool (Eastblock Vendor Advocates, 9/2018).

Mature 'framing' trees are to the house's south and north sides. A paved forecourt/turning circle addresses the porte cochere protruding from the front elevation, bordered by hedging.

The (former service) courtyard behind house between its two rear wings is grassed with hedged shrubs bordering the verandahs to the buildings on three sides, a central feature bed and statue.

House / buildings:
Two-storey brick/rubble and stucco Georgian style house from c.1830-39. The house has been restored and reconstructed from a semi-ruinous condition.

It has ducted air-conditioning, six king-sized bedrooms, four bathrooms and two garage spaces (Eastblock Vendor Advocates, 9/2018).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
House conserved and restored 1980s
Date condition updated:08 Apr 98
Modifications and dates: 1930s: cellars filled, verandah removed, porch added, eastern part of house reconstructed, outbuildings demolished
1976: roof reconstructed
c 7/1980: Demolition had already started when a preservation order was placed over the property, but not before vandals stripped its internal fittings including cedar doors, windows and shutters, a cedar staircase and all the marble mantlepieces. Although the interior is a mass of fallen masonry and splintered timber, the exterior is sound and the owners recently erected a new roof and boarded the windows and doors up in an effort to prevent further vandalism. The property is now for sale (Dawson, 1980).
Current use: Office, residence
Former use: Aboriginal land, colonial farm and rural dwelling/estate

History

Historical notes: Horningsea Park was one of Governor Lachlan Macquarie's large pastoral grants made following the establishment of Liverpool in the 1810s. The 500 acre property was granted to Lieutenant Joshua John Moore in 1819 (Keating, 1995). The grant was conditional on 50 acres being cultivated within five years (Israel, 2012, 17). Moore was one of the few early settlers allowed to pass through the Cowpastures with cattle in 1821 to his land at Baw Baw. He was the first pastoralist to occupy land on the present site of Canberra and his is the first written mention of that name.

In the 1840s Polish explorer and discoverer of Mt Kosciusko, Pavel (Paul) Edmund Strzelecki, lived at Horningsea Park. The place thus has strong links with early exploration beyond the Cumberland Plain, as well as with the early movement of the Australian economy from an agricultural to a pastoral base.

Moore was a Lieutenant in the 14th Regiment of Foot and a Waterloo veteran. He arrived in NSW in 1816 and was appointed Clerk to the Judge Advocate. Horningsea Park was part of an integrated area of large pastoral grants (mainly to military or civil officers or wealthy free settlers) which stretched from Liverpool to the Nepean River. Horningsea Park escaped the subdivision of the area which took place in the 1880s boom.

Moore's first residence on Horningsea Park was Cumberland Cottage built in the 1820s (Keating, 1995). There were five employees listed as working on the property in the 1828 census: a woman servant, a boot maker, a gardener and two labourers. As well as indicating the presence of accommodation on the property at the time, a woman servant would imply a homestead (Israel, 2012, 17).

The present Horningsea House was built in the 1830s, by 1839 (Keating, 1995) using convict labour. An unreferenced map (1882) described by Keating shows the house, grand driveway, and an assemblage of outbuildings around the house (Israel, 2012, 17). The Moore family sold Horningsea in 1855 to clear debts from the 1840s depression. (Keating 1995).

The property was later leased by Sir Paul Strzelecki, famous for his involvement in the discovery of Mount Kosciuszko. (Dawson, 1980).

Subdivision of the original 500 acre grant took place in the 1880s (Israel, 2012, 5).

The house was described in 1907 has having 13 rooms and a detached kitchen and wash house at the rear. There was a large stable and buildigns associated with dairying and grazing (Keating, 1995, in Israel, 2012, 18).

The house underwent extensive renovations in the 1930s - the cellars were filled in and the (front) verandah was replaced with the present porch (Keating, 1995).

In 1947 the house and a sixty acre block were separated from the remaining (612 acres of) land, which was subdivided in 1949. The 60 acre house block was later expanded to 90 acres and was bought by Lucile and Michael Polya, dairy farmers (Israel, 2012, 17). Following the loss of its pastoral context in the 1950s (Dawson, 1980), by 1960 the holding was reduced to 22 acres (9 hectares), the size and shape it remains today (Israel, 2012, 17). It was used as a residence until c.1974 when the Polyas sold the property (Israel, 2012, 17). It had reached a derelict state by the 1970s (Dawson, 1980).

The house was classified by the National Trust of Australia in 1976, when it was also saved from demolition after intervention from the Minister for Planning and Liverpool Council (Israel, 2012, 17). After many changes in ownership the house and 22 acres came into possession of a British-based company who proposed development of the site for a caravan park. Demolition had already started when a preservation order was placed over the property, but not before vandals stripped its internal fittings including cedar doors, windows and shutters, a cedar staircase and all the marble mantelpieces. The owners recently erected a new roof and boarded up windows and doors. The property was put up for sale in 1980 (Dawson, 1980).

The house was stabilised, progressively reconstructed (from 1982) and what was the gutted shell was extensively renovated following its recognition as a heritage item and making of a permanent conservation order in 1983. It is presently the office of a land company managing an adjacent residential subdivision.

At that time some of the outbuildings were still standing and the work included demolition of a single-storey service wing on the northern side of the house (Keating, 1995). These were visiable in photographs taken prior to the reconstruction in the early 1980s (Israel, 2012, 18). In 1991 the Liverpool Heritage Study referred to sandstone and pressed-brick footings associated with former outbuildings (ibid). Footings of outbuildings were visible in 1991. As these footings were described as being of 'machine-made bricks', the structures were most likely built during the twentieth century (ibid, 18).

The house today is a product of the extensive reconstruction it underwent in the early 1980s, c1982. The floors and joinery are new, photographs of that time showing a shell. Usual areas of archaeological potential such as underfloor spaces were removed or disturbed at this time. For intents and purposes the house, except for its southern, eastern and western walls and the internal load-bearing walls, was built c1982. The cellars date to the house's original construction. Of the original property the curtilage is now quite small. The sites of most of the property's work buildings are likely to be under the neighbouring housing subdivision. The outbuildings nearest to the house, of which the detached kitchen and wash house are specifically referred to, are likely to have been disturbed by the reconstruction works and subsequent landscaping. A cistern stands close to the house's north-west corner. It has been converted into a wine cellar (ibid, 18).

An aging late-1990s pear tree was removed in 2012 as part of approval of a new swimming pool, cabana and filter room to the rear of the house's southern wing, with the condition of replacement by another fruiting pear tree cultivar (Heritage Council, 2012).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. (none)-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. (none)-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Daruk nation - sites of first contact or early interaction with colonisers-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Turf farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Mushroom farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Exploration-Activities associated with making places previously unknown to a cultural group known to them. (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Dairying-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Selecting land for pastoral or agricultural purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Villa-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Georgian revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 2000-2050-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Convict housing near workplaces-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living on the urban fringe-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Aaron Muron Bolot, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Sir Paul Strzelecki, explorer esp. Mt.Kosciuszko-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Lt. Joshua John Moore, veteran soldier, asst.to Judge Advocate, pastoralist-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The intact survival of Horningsea Park for so long as a large rural entity is significant testimony to its viability as a pastoral and dairying assemblage. In relation to its setting within the estate the house retains an ability to demonstrate socially and historically significant concepts about Australian colonial and post-colonial life. The place has strong links with early exploration beyond the Cumberland Plain, as well as with the early movement of the Australian economy from an agricultural to a pastoral base (Keating 1995).
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
A fine early Georgian homestead, with visual evidence of its former estate and surrounded by trees some of which are from the original garden. (Heritage Office)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
One of a limited number of early large homesteads surviving on the Cumberland Plain.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Characteristic of the large pastoral estate houses which developed with the growth of the early Australian economy from an agricultural to a pastoral base.
Integrity/Intactness: Severely damaged in the 1970s by part-demolition. Since restored.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementCarry out an Archaeological Assessment 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0025502 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0025520 May 83   
Local Environmental Plan  16 Feb 96   
Register of the National Estate 0025521 Mar 78 0742249

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Liverpool Heritage Study1990 (not stated)  No
Liverpool Heritage Study Review2004 FORM Architects Australia P/L  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCasey & Lowe Associates1999Archaeological assessment: Horningsea House, Horningsea Park Estate Date:
WrittenChristopher Keating1995A Thematic History of Horningsea Park, Liverpool NSW
WrittenColin Israel Heritage Advice2012• Statement of Heritage Impact- Horningsea Park House, 18 Horningsea Park Drive, Horningsea Park 2171
WrittenDawson, John1980Woollahra loses a landmark - the battle to save our heritage - a victory and a defeat

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045199
File number: 12/12345; S90/03753 & HC 32167


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