Glenlee, outbuildings, garden & gatelodge | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Glenlee, outbuildings, garden & gatelodge

Item details

Name of item: Glenlee, outbuildings, garden & gatelodge
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.0884052876 Long: 150.7579520810
Primary address: Glenlee Road, Menangle Park, NSW 2563
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP713646
LOT2 DP713646
LOT3 DP713646
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Glenlee RoadMenangle ParkCampbelltown   Primary Address
 Menangle ParkCampbelltown NarellanCumberlandDuplicate Address

Statement of significance:

The Glenlee estate is a rural cultural landscape of exceptional significance including elements of Aboriginal heritage significance, association with early influential European settlers and the exceptional composition of the architecture and landscape setting of the homestead group.

It is the core remnant including the accessway of the Glenlee estate, an important and rare surviving early 19th century pastoral holding in the Mount Annan/Menangle district of the Cow Pastures once considered as one of the best and earliest dairy farms in the colony. The estate was one of the first farms in Sydney's west to make the change from cereal cropping to dairying in the 19th century and the property continued to prosper throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

The landscape of the area of the estate is of exceptional aesthetic value as a rare reminder of the former pastoral industry which once characterised the area. It is still possible to appreciate the siting of the homestead in view of, and with frontage to, the Nepean River as part of the original land grant. The mid-19th century Southern Railway, though sited close to the homestead group, was constructed to maintain this visual relationship. The siting of the homestead group in a context of undulating landform, is an outstanding example of colonial landscape planning to form a picturesque composition with direct sightlines to the neighbouring Camden Park estate and the Great Dividing Range.

The Glenlee homestead group is a rare and significant complex of buildings and plantings, approached by a formal drive and sited with commanding views over the countryside to the west and south-west. It includes the remnant core of a rare early colonial farm estate focussed on the fine and sophisticated Regency design of the main house with its rare recessed portico. In addition, it includes its original servants' wing, outbuildings, farm buildings, a gatehouse and early plantings including a landmark bunya pine near the house.

The homestead dates from 1823 and is one of only a handful of early surviving colonial houses in the Sydney region, remarkable for its level of integrity and its original setting on the estate amongst 19th century farm buildings and plantings. It demonstrates exceptional architectural sophistication for the period of construction (c.1823) and a rare example of Old Colonial Regency style, of which both Henry Kitchen and Francis Greenway (both of whom the house's design has been attributed to) were key practitioners.

Glenlee is significant for its association with free settler William Howe and family. Howe established the estate, was instrumental in establishing the Bank of NSW in Camden, and an important early free colonist who did much to promote pastoral interests in Sydney's west, and was one of the first farmers in the district to successfully make the change from cereal cropping to dairying.

Glenlee is also significant for its association with emancipated convict James Fitzpatrick and his family, who were responsible for the continued expansion of the estate and for its operation as a successful dairy farm. The family were prominent local citizens and remained in residence at Glenlee for over a century, demonstrating a remarkable pattern of continued usage of the property.

Howe and Fitzpatrick families held Glenlee from c.1822 to 1859 and 1859 to 1968/9 respectively, and the history of these families on the estate is a microcosm of the development of colonial Australia in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Glenlee is also significant for its association with Colonial architect Henry Kitchen, and with Colonial Architect Francis Greenway, who may have played a role in its redesign.

The area close to the house has high archaeological potential associated with its occupation and use by the Dharawal Aboriginal people prior to and immediately after European settlement, and for its association with the former pastoral uses of the estate, its outbuildings and former outbuildings. The area presents some opportunities to study and interpret the lifestyle and culture of the Dharawal people, through interpretation of the landscape and the discovery of associated artefacts. It also presents opportunities to study and interpret the former pastoral and continuing agricultural uses of the estate and area.
Date significance updated: 22 Feb 12
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Henry Kitchen
Builder/Maker: Robert Gooch and Nathaniel Payton
Construction years: 1824-1859
Physical description: Farm:
Significant colonial rural cultural landscape, with deliberately sited curving entrance road to give dramatic view of homestead group and river and mountains beyond, past a gate lodge, a square stuccoed brick building with a hipped, originally shingled roof, later corrugated iron-clad.

The wider landscape is of grazed paddocks, with stands of remnant older indigenous trees, particularly on higher ground. An olive grove has been established southeast and northeast of the house in the c.1990s.

Homestead Group:
A careful composition of homestead and outbuildings and gardens, on a raised platform for wide views to the south, west and north. A fine composition of farm / estate outbuildings lie to the south / south-east of the homestead, uphill. Historic vineyards were also on this southern / south-eastern side of the homestead.

Remnant core estate including formal drive access way of a rare colonial farm estate, with important individual elements including:
- the 1820s homestead;
- outbuildings to the homestead's south and south-east, forming a courtyard;
- farm buildings further to the south-east;
- a gatehouse (now a ruin) and nearby relatively recently built olive processing building on the approach drive; and
- various lawns and garden plantings.

Garden:
Plantings include a signature Bunya Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) south-east of the house, a huge forest red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) and silky oak (Grevillea robusta) north-west of the house. Impressive garden around homestead with many older remnant plantings, including pines and angophoras. Other mature trees north-west of the house include Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), European olive (Olea africana var.europeana cv.). Other mature plantings include a huge old kurrajong (Brachychiton populneus) near the stables block east of the house, a Brazilian pepper(corn) tree (Schinus molle var.areira) east of the house, a privet hedge (Ligustrum spp.) north-east of the house. Younger contributory plantings include brush box trees (Lophostemon confertus) and jacaranda (J.mimosifolia) south-west of the house (Stuart Read pers.comm., 7/11/2016).

Views and framing plantings:
The homestead enjoys a broad panoramic view (southwest to northwest) across the Great Southern Railway line to and an important visual connection between the Great Dividing Range, Nepean River and Camden Park estate ridgeline.
Low Cape honeysuckle (Tecomaria capensis) hedges underline the panoramic views out to Mount Annan in the north-west, and frame views west and south-west towards Camden Park, the Razorback and the Great Dividing Ranges. Lower again hedges of sweet box (Murraya paniculata) and Cape leadwort (Plumbago capensis) define inner areas of garden such as a rear 'courtyard' east of the house. Beds of hardy perennials and ground covers such as Nile / African lilies (Agapanthus praecox), bird-of-paradise flower (Strelitzia reginae)(Stuart Read pers.comm., 7/11/2016).

There is a dramatic and impressive view of Glenlee homestead and its broad landscape opening up suddenly near the crest of the access road (Glenlee Road) from off Menangle Road.

Homestead:
Regency Colonial homestead, two storeys, of brick and sandstone. Very formal Palladian composition inspired more by Palladio's work and writing rather than by English Whig country architecture's usual interpretation of it.

Single range building, with a substantial central stair hall projecting into the rear verandahs, one room to either side and box rooms at the corners in enclosed bays. Unusual recessed verandah on main facade. By recessing the ground floor verandah into the body of the house in the form of a portico or loggia (southwest face) the main rooms on the upper floor became disproportionally larger - by half as much again, than those on the ground floor. Also unusual is the cantilevered stone staircase at the rear (east) of the house, reputedly the oldest such staircase in Australia.

Continuous sill or string course to the first floor windows. Projecting externally expressed stairwell in square form.

Gabled or pedimented detached single storey offices on south side, was kitchen and offices and housing for domestic staff, while the convicts were locked up in the cellar below. The dairy operation was inside the servants' quarters, or rather, these grew up around it (Kemp 2001)

The work resembles that of Francis Greenway, Colonial Architect, based on Kitchen's death in 1822 and similarities in design with Greenway's Liverpool hospital and other works (Broadbent & Hughes 1997)

Outbuildings:
- outbuildings to the homestead's south and south-east, forming a courtyard.

Farm Buildings:
- farm buildings further to the south-east; including a slab stables (rebuilt after damage by a fire); and further outbuildings now functioning as an outdoor entertaining area for events.

Gate House and Olive-Processing Shed:
- a gatehouse (now a ruin) and nearby relatively-recently built olive processing building on the approach drive.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Much of the land with the exception of close to the homestead group, has been ploughed to plant olive trees.

Condition of house and main outbuildings is good, post 1980s restoration works.
Modifications and dates: 1818 3000 acre grant
1823 New barn burnt down
1827 Sale of 420 acres
1828 3500 acres in consolidated estate
1839 Howe bought back 420 acres sold in 1827 and several other adjoining lots.
c1840s Converted from wheat cropping to dairy farm.

1850s Mainly focused on sheep production
1857 Main Southern Railway line surveyed
1866 Railway constructed through estate in a cutting west of the house.
1870s Part of estate leased to small tenant farmers for fruit and vegetable production
1879 First major house alteration - stairwall redecorated in imitation of Siena marble by Campbelltown painter Robert Campion

1883 Colonnade rebuilt on the main facade.
1890s House underwent considerable remodelling. It was rendered in stucco, resashed, the front door replaced, the chair boads and other original jointery detailes removed inside.
c1900 The roof, originally shingled, was replaced by corrugated iron. The interior walls were wallpapered (and remained so until the 1970s).
1911 Part of estate sold to miner, Mr Clinton, coal dumping began.
1914 Menangle Park Racetrack created on part of the estate.
1930s The original chimney pieces were replaced and new bathrooms installed.

1950s Coal washery and transhipment facility and rail siding/spur constructed to west of estate, between Mt. Annan & river.
1959 Coal dumping on Clinton's siding commenced again.

1977/8 Received National Estate Funding of $33,000 which funded restoration of house (Clive Lucas for SPA) focusing on waterproofing works. A new kitchen was added. Restoration of interiors substantially to their 1820s appearance, except for the drawing room which was maintained in its 1890s style. Many original features e.g. painting scheme, were uncovered with removal of wallpapers.
1980s Winding down of coal dumping.
1983 Damaged sections of stair wall restored by William Whitlam and much Georgian cedar joinery renewed.
1984 Old cobblestones gradually uncovered, bathroom altered from 1930s to a simple, modern style, landscaping under Michael Lehany and James Broadbent to restore earlier geometry and reinstate main western front as the main focus, and screen the coal wash to the west. Restoration of slab building stables (predating 1842).
1985 Onward property is 45 acres.

c1999 Some planted with 7000 olive trees in the higher land east and south of the homestead (producing olio nuovo and milder late-harvest oil (Schwartzkoff in SMH Good Living 19/1/2010, 7).

2002 New olive processing shed constructed near original gatehouse, and gatehouse conserved and stablised and reused as a display/sale room for visitors to the property.

Mid-2014 Olive plantations removed.
Further information: Currently zoned non urban (minimum 40 ha lots), and open space under IDO 15. Setting particularly to the south and east is under threat from urban development (Menangle Park local expansion, with Landcom, APP & Campbelltown City Council involved (Stuart Read, 19/1/10).
Current use: private country home, grazing
Former use: Aborginal land, farm, sheep farm, vine-growing, mixed dairy farm, hay production, olive production

History

Historical notes: The Dharawal Aboriginal people were the occupants of the area until Europeans arrived and they recorded, in a sandstone shelter nearby, the cattle which had escaped from the first British settlement at Sydney Cove in 1788 and established themselves on the good grazing ground in the Menangle-Camden district (which came to be called 'the Cow Pastures'). When the first squatters arrived in the district after 1800 there was no initial conflict, but the acceleration of the process of land grants produced increasing tension between the settlers and the Aboriginal people, culminating in the Appin massacre in 1816. Gradually after that the number of Aboriginal people diminished through disease and alienation of their traditional hunting grounds.

Following the lead of the wild cattle, the earliest use of the Mount Annan district by farmers was for cattle grazing (Campbelltown News 1949).

Land in the area was rapidly parcelled out by Governor Macquarie. By 1817, all of the available land in the Minto and upper Minto districts had been granted, while in the Airds district, 4000 acres had been granted. Within the overall Menangle Park area, it seems that many of the grantees did at least attempt to farm their land. In this area, initial grants awarded were two large grants of 200 acres each to two notable individuals, James Harrex and Henry Kable, in December 1809. The bulk of grants in the area were laid out in relatively small areas of 30 or 40 acres in August 1812, with some larger ones to more prominent individuals, such as Robert Campbell and Mary Reiby (Tropman & Tropman 2017:7-8).

The road to Campbelltown was named the Airds Road, and ran south to Menangle. This name was originally applied to this area, north of the (Nepean) River. The road then crossed the ford at Birds Eye Corner and went south to Stonequarry Creek (later Picton). The ford was steep and difficult to cross. A bridge was approved for Birds Eye Corner after landholder lobbying, but its location was shifted to Camden. On 2 March 1825, surveyor William Harper was instructed to lay out a road to the Nepean via Campbelltown. A gang commenced clearing the route in July 1825, and William Howe offered advice. Work commenced on a bridge at Menangle in November 1855. The initial surge of grants in the area occurred in the 1810s and the last were given out in the 1830s. Many original grantees did not hold onto their lands but transferred them to land engrossers. Poor fertility appears to have been a factor. The main engrossers of land were William Howe of Glenlee and James Harrex of Parramatta, both of whom had acquired most of their estates by 1825. Other engrossers were the Taber family, related to Harrex by marriage and John Vardy, who added to land he acquired through his wife after their marriage in 1840 (Tropman & Tropman 2017:7-9).

By 1810, John Macarthur held 7000 acres at Camden Park on the west side of the Nepean River (Campbelltown News 1949).

Glenlee:
In January 1818 Governor Macquarie granted 3000 acres on the eastern side of the river (at Minto, to be known as 'Eskdale')(Tropman & Tropman 2017:15) to William Howe, a Scottish free settler who had arrived in 1816. Howe's estate was called Glenlee after his birthplace in Scotland. Howe was an agricultural entrepreneur, Magistrate and later a Superintendant of Police. He was first magistrate of the county of Airds (Campbelltown News 1949).

Howe had already purchased Michael Hayes' 120-acre grant to the south of this, where he built Glenlee House. Nevertheless, this 3000 acre grant was to form the bulk of his Glenlee estate, along with other land he purchased adjacent (Tropman & Tropman 2017:15).

By 1820, Howe had expanded his property to over 7000 acres and was shipping wool to London (Britton & Morris 2000). Between 1821 and 1823 Glenlee produced wheat and meat for the government stores. He also produced dairy products for the Sydney market in the 1820s (Kemp 2001).

Howe lived at nearby Molles Main, the property of Col. George Molle while Glenlee was built, and began his farming pursuits, purchasing 700 sheep and 400 lambs from Alexander Riley in January 1817, in addition to receiving cattle from the Government herds (Britton & Morris 2000:85).

The homestead was designed in 1823 by Henry Kitchen, the first non-convict architect and built for William and Mary Howe in 1823-4, partly on land Howe had purchased in 1816 from Michael Hayes. Convict labour was used to establish the farm and build the outbuildings, with Howe declaring that he had nine acres of garden or orchard in the 1822 muster (in a total of 7200 acres which he held through grant, lease or purchase) (Britton & Morris 2000). Robert Gooch and Nathaniel Payton were contracted to build the homestead in April 1823 to a plan by Henry Kitchen. By 1824 Howe had occupied Glenlee House which he had built to a design by architect Henry Kitchen (Britton & Morris 2000:85).

A comparison of details for the land grantees of small parcels handed out in the 1810 and 1822 Muster and in the 1828 census shows how quickly small grants were sold up. William Howe held his land but was a large holder who would accumlulate numerous small grants. The men who accumulated the small grants used them to establish large pastoral or mixed farming properties, the best example of which was Glenlee, held by William Howe. Others used these properties as home farms for their expansion onto pastoral acreages beyond the Limits of Location (40 counties). In 1849, William and Edward Howe held 11,500 acres at Wedgagallong in the Lachlan district, as well as William Howe junior and Edward Howe holding 3500 acres at Long Point in the Murrumbidgee district (Tropan & Tropamn 2017:9).

By the 1828 census Howe's land transactions had stabilised to a holding of 3500 acres (1400ha) - 1000 acres cleared and 500 cultivated. In 1832 the "New South Wales Calendar and General Post Office Directory" described the gardens as "extensive, the vinery being in a forward state" (Britton & Morris 2000:85).

Howe developed his Glenlee estate into a model property. By the 1830s, Glenlee was one of the best dairy farms in NSW. It was sowed with improved pastures and Howe was able to sell the hay. Hedges of quince (Cydonia oblonga) and lemon (Citrus x limon) trees divided the fields. Howe was also a paternalistic landowner, looking after his 60 employees (Tropan & Tropman 2017:17).

In 1833 Mrs Felton Mathew described the farm "a nearer spot is 'Glenlee', the proprietor of which is also an old settler is distinguished by his attention to the cultivation of English grasses: the best, if not the only hay in the country, is grown here: and Mr Howe has, it is said, laid out his grounds with true good taste in the best English style, dividing the meadows with hedges instead of the rough wooden fences everywhere use: many other large tracts of cleared land we could distinguish from our elevated situation". Mrs Mathew also continued, noting that the principal crop in the district was wheat, and "peas are grown in fields about here, the only part of the country in which I have seen them so cultivated" (Britton & Morris 2000:85).

By 1834 the property was regarded as the one of the finest in the colony with ...an established vinery. Glenlee's famous butter, Sun and Thistle, was the first ever exported to England from New South Wales. By the 1830s Glenlee was sowed with improved pastures and Howe was able to sell the hay. He was a paternalistic landowner looking after his 60 employees (Casey & Lowe 2017:19).

In 1837 the Reverend John Dunmore Lang visited Glenlee and described it: "About three miles beyond Campbelltown to the right is the dairy farm or estate of Glenlee - there is a large extent of cleared land on the Glenlee estate, the greater part of which has been laid down with English grasses, the paddocks being separated from each other by hedges of quince or lemon tree - the usual but seldom used Colonial substitutes for the hawthorn. The country is of an undulating character, and the scenery from Glenlee House - a handsome two storey house built partly of brick and partly of a drab-coloured sandstone - is rich and most agreeably diversified" (Prescott 2003).

By 1839 Howe was leasing Portion 25, Parish of Narellan, John Love's 45 acre grant of 1812, south of Howe's 3000 acre Glenlee/Eskdale grant and north of the 120 acre lot Howe had bought from Michael Hayes and built Glenlee House on. Howe also leased adjacent Portion 26, Parish of Narellan, John Hoare's 45 acre grant of 1812, which, along with Love's adjacent grant, were both, by 1839, held by Daniel Cooper, merchant (Tropman & Tropman 2017:16). Both these portions remained in the ownership of Daniel Cooper, and after his 1853 death, his nephew Daniel Cooper Jr. (later, Sir Daniel Cooper). These two lots remained separately owned and occupied (in 1899 by Edward Bergan, farmer) with separate right of way across Glenlee estate. In 1911 Bergin was conveyed these two grants (Tropamn & Tropman 2017:17).

In 1839, William Howe and his son bought many cattle and horses from the estate of William Redfern (of Glenfield Farm) and Howe mortgaged Glenlee in order to pay for them. Howe did not manage to repay the loan and the land passed to the mortgagees in 1850. However the Howes remained as lessees until William Howe Jr. died in 1858 (Tropman & Tropman 2017:17). That 1839 mortgate security included 3000 acres granted to Howe; 200 acres granted to Mary Reiby; 120 acres granted to Hayes; 88 acres granted to Campbell; 40 acres granted to Tyson; and 50 acres granted to Howson (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

Glenlee estate as one of the best dairy farms in the colony was unusual and half a century before dairying was generally practised in the district it was adopted here (i.e., in the 1820s) (Liston 1988).

During the 1840s and '50s Glenlee, famous for its "Sun and Thistle" butter, was largely farmed by tenants. Some dairy products were exported to England. Speculation and the 1840s depression led to Glenlee being mortgaged but the family remained lessees (Britton & Morris 2000:86).

Howe died in 1855 and his wife sold the property to James Fitzpatrick and it remained in the Fitzpatrick family (with various subdivisions to family members) until 1968 when it was purchased by the State Planning Authority, which gazetted it as a place of historic interest in 1973 (Prescott 2003).

In the 1850s the dairy operation appears to have dwindled and sheep production increased (Kemp 2001).

The railway penetrated the area soon after railway communication began in the colony (Tropman & Tropman 2017:9). The route for the new Southern Railway line was surveyed in 1857 (Britton & Morris 2000:86). In 1858 the Great Southern Railway was completed to Campbelltown. By August 1862, a platform had opened on the northern bank of the Nepean and operated while a bridge was built across the river for the railway (Tropman & Tropman 2017:9). When constructed in 1866, the line was sited in a cutting in close proximity to Glenlee house, maintaining views from the house over the property. James Fitzpatrick by the 1860s owned most of the farms west from Campbelltown toward Narellan and many south toward Menangle (Britton & Morris 2000:86). He commenced a longstanding ownership of this property, having made his fortune in squatting and acquired Glenlee as his County of Cumberland base station (Tropman & Tropman 2017:9).

Fitzpatrick had come to Australia as a convict in 1822 and worked as a servant of Hamilton Hume, the explorer and farmer. Fitzpatrick's crime was described as 'insurrection' but it is not clear just what was the cause or details...When Captain William Hovell (who had been granted 700 acres of adjoining land to the north at 'Naralling Grange' in 1816) and his colleague Hamilton Hume organised their famous 1824 expedition to find the land route to the southern coast of Victoria, they chose Fitzpatrick to be in the party as an assigned convict. Hovell, in his diary in 1825, described James Fitzpatrick as 'a gentleman who in an unfortunate moment committed an offence for which he is enduring a punishment far too severe" (Wrigley c.2003).

After the expedition and through various opportunities, Fitzpatrick became prosperous in the colony as a farmer and land owner. He bought the large 'Glenlee' estate in the late 1850s and extended his property all the way through (north) to Narellan, including the land first owned by Hovell (Wrigley c.2003). Fitzpatrick of 'The Grange' near Narellan, landholder, bought various district estates (Mowatt's Magellan estate (formerly W.H.Hovell's); the Grimes grant in 1851; Throsby's 'Smeaton'. By the 1860s Fitzpatrick held most of the grants southwest of Campelltown towards Menangle. The family added other adjacent land when they could acquire them (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

A post office had operated for a short time in the area and in June 1865 its name was changed from Riversford to Menangle. From the 1870s onward, horse races were held at Menangle Park next to the railway. This encouraged J.J. Smith, H. Pateson and Dr. L.J. Lamrock to acqure 80 acres and lay down a new track. Two sidings were built to bring spectators, horses and others to the track (Tropman & Tropman 2017:10).

In 1875, M. R. Campion, painter and decorator, had altered Glenlee House, painting the stair hall to resemble marble. Various families such as Cummins, Michael J. Vardy, the Tabers, Conroy and Doyle also leased Glenlee (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

In 1876 (3/3/1876) Porton 24, Parish of Narellan, 40 acres of land directly south of Howe's 3000 acre Glenlee grant (and north of the 120 acre lot Howe had purchsed from Michael Hayes and built Glenlee House on) was conveyed to James Fitzpatrick, becoming part of Fitzpatrick's Glenlee estate (Tropman & Tropman 2017:15-16).

In the 1870s a large part of the estate was leased to small tenant farmers who produced fruit and vegetables. These included a Chinese migrant, "Old Shoo" who maintained a flourishing market garden adjacent to the railway tracks. The estate at this time was probably dotted with as many as two dozen cottages within walking distance of the main homestead (Kemp 2001).

Before Appin was so well catered for by the shop keepers, horses and carts would pay weekly visits almost from the turn of the 20th century, coming from Campbelltown, Menangle and other places, loaded with groceries, fruit and vegetables, drapery, etc. (Percival 1992:53).

James Fitzpatrick died on 27/7/1882 (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18). His three children inherited the land and daughter Elizabeth married Edward Sedgwick and built the present 'Narellan Grange' house in 1894. The name of Sedgwick was then associated with the property (Narellan Grange) until well into the 20th century. Edward Sedgwick was mayor of Campbelltown in 1899. His son Frederick Joseph 'Mate' Sedgwick, was a prominent dairy industry leader and the producers' representative director on the NSW Milk Board for many years (Wrigley c.2003).

In 1883 the colonnade was rebuilt on Glenlee house's main facade. In the 1890s the house underwent considerable remodelling. It was rendered in stucco, resashed, the front door replaced, the chair boards and other original joinery details removed inside. In c.1900 the roof, originally shingled, was replaced by corrugated iron. The interior walls were wallpapered (and remained so until the 1970s) (Kemp 2001).

In August 1885 a new platform opened, renamed North Menangle in 1889 (it is now Menangle Park). Rural land was still used for livestock after the shift of grain cropping west of the mountains after the outbreak of rust in wheat crops on the coast. As well as being farmed by owners, the estates were often let in whole or in part to tenant farmers. The stock return of 1884 showed that the emphasis of the district had become cattle, though E.J. Dedrop still had 275 sheep against his 65 cattle (Tropman & Tropman 2017:10).

In 1900 landholders almost all concentrated on dairying, which had taken over the farms in major fashion. They also grazed other livestock, and grew some crops. Since these comprised maize, oats and barley, it is likely that some at least was grown as supplementary feed for their livestock (Tropman & Tropman 2017:10).

The Glenlee estate continued to maintain its high reputation. In 1902, James Hassall remembered that Glenlee butter had been famous on the Sydney market for many years (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

In 1905 Glenlee (3500 acres) remained the largest farm in the district, and was leased to Conroy and Doyle, who planned converting it into a sheep farm (this was overturned by a public meeting at the time). Three dairies were still active on the estate, and 60 acres were given over to market gardens, employing 32 (Kemp 2001). The Old Minto Road (some of which was mostly privately used by Glenlee for access) did not follow its earlier line, so that some land needed to be purchased to make up the discrepancy. On 29/12/1905 surveyor RJA Roberts reported that this land was known as 'the Minto Road' in Howe's grant description, and was not used much by the public but mainly by people getting access to Glenlee homestead and to Glenlee (railway) platform (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

In 1910 John Glenlee Fitzpatrick took up residence at Glenlee, neighbouring Smeaton Grange was occupied by James Fitzpatrick's daughter Elizabeth Sedgwick and the other daughter lived at nearby Kilbride overlooking Mount Gilead. The family operated their own dairy at Glenlee and employed herdsmen (Kemp 2001).

In 1911 a NSW Minister of Health decided on Glenlee as a possible location for a mental institution. When the Fitzpatricks refused to sell, he threatened to take 500 acres of the property over. As a delaying tactic, part of the land at issue was sold to a miner, Mr Clinton, as a place to store his coal. With a change of government these plans were dropped. Clinton later began dumping coal at Glenlee again in 1959 (Kemp 2001).

The Menangle Park racecourse was a major attraction to outsiders. In 1914, local architect Alfred Rose Payten designed three grandstands for James Glenlee Fitzpatric (Kemp 2001), which were built by EC Lusted of Campbelltown. The racecourse was renamed as Menangle Park that year, 1914 and a new track built on an 80 acre site, with railway siding for the track. JJ Smith, H Pateson and Dr JL Lamrock were directors of the company. The racecourse had grandstands, official stands, luncheon rooms and amenities. During World War I, there was an internment camp for enemy aliens at the racecourse. Two small subdivisions of land near the trotting track were made in 1920. These became the nucleus of a small village, which emerged around the railway platform and racetrack (Tropman & Tropman 2017:10).

By the 1920s the Fitzpatrick family of Glenlee employed dairymen to run the dairies on their property (Tropman & Tropman 2017:18).

In the 1930s the original chimney pieces were replaced and new bathrooms installed (Kemp 2001). Coal mining became an increasingly important industry from the 1930s onwards (Britton & Morris 2000:86).

During World War II, Menangle Park racecourse became a military camp for the 45th battalion of the militia and then for the Air Force. In 1945 it was used to film the Australian feature film, 'Smithy' (Tropman & Tropman 2017:10).

When the State Government's 1946 proposal to resume Glenlee for a new mental hospital met strong local opposition, especially since it was an historic property and as a working dairy farm, employed a number of local people (Tropman & Tropman 2017:19) and was debated from 1946-50, the local member Jeff Bate argued vigorously against the move as Glenlee was still a working dairy farm and market garden (likely the area of intensive cultivation) with 32 employees and of historical importance (Britton & Morris 2000:86). It produced 10,800 gallons of milk per month, from two dairies. The proposal did not proceed (Tropman & Tropman 2017:19).

In 1949 the property had three working dairies and part of a fourth on it, supplying 1,200,000 pints of milk to the city through the Campbelltown Depot of Dairy Farmers Cooperative Company Ltd. The Fitzpatricks at that time were pure (stock) breeders. The Campbelltown-Camden-Picton area at that time was the centre for the breeding of Ayrshire cattle for the Commonwealth and the Fitzpatricks had stud stock on the property which had won prizes against such famous breeders of Ayrshires as the McIntosh brothers (of Denbigh) and Camden Park Estate Ltd, at the Camden, Campbelltown and Royal Sydney Shows. Objections to the proposed mental hospital came from the Cumberland County Council, Milk Board, Metropolitan Water Sewerage and Drainage Board and Campbelltown Municipal Council (Campbelltown News 1949).

Until the 1950s the Glenlee and Camden Park estates comprised an uninterrupted rural landscape spanning the Nepean River. However increasing production of coal from the Burragorang/ Nattai River mines to the southwest, and the need to transport it to the export loading plant at Balmain in Sydney, led to construction by the Joint Coal Board of a new rail siding, washery and transhipment facility at Glenlee, between Mount Annan and the river, in the 1950s. Coal mining had become an increasingly important industry since the 1930s. A two kilometre rail spur to this facility, named Clinton's siding, was constructed from the Main Southern Railway in December 1958 (for loading coal, from nearby mines). That commenced at Glenlee siding on 14/1/1959 (Tropman & Tropman 2017:19). The railway spur line was electrified as part of the extension of metropolitan railway electrification to Campbelltown in 1968. The use of the coal facility peaked in the 1960s and 1970s (Britton & Morris 2000:86).

Glenlee was acquired by the State Planning Authority/ Macarthur Development Board in 1968/9. In 1969 architect John Fisher (member of the Institute of Architects, the Cumberland County Council Historic Buildings Committee and on the first Council of the National Trust of Australia (NSW) after its reformation in 1960) was commissioned by the State Planning Authority to restore the first five houses in Campbelltown, which had been resumed under the Cumberland County Planning Scheme. These houses included Glenalvon (Lucas & McGinness 2012).

In 1978 Glenlee house was listed on the Register of the National Estate and in 1977/8 received National Estate Funding of $33,000 which funded waterproofing works. 1977/8 it received National Estate Funding of $33,000 funding restoration of the house (Clive Lucas of Fisher Lucas for SPA; Morris & Britton 2000 say this work was done in 1974) focusing on waterproofing works. A new kitchen was added. The interiors were restored substantially to their 1820s appearance, except for the drawing room which was maintained in its 1890s style. Many original features e.g.: painting scheme, were uncovered with removal of wallpapers.

In 1982 the house and part of its estate (bounded by the Main Southern Railway on the west) was made subject of a Permanent Conservation Order under the NSW Heritage Act 1977. Meanwhile the larger estate was designated a Scenic Protection zone in 1975 and part of it set aside for development of a new botanic garden in 1984.

Glenlee house and its surrounding land have since been sold back into private ownership on 45 acres. In 1983 damaged sections of stair wall were restored by William Whitlam and much Georgian cedar joinery was renewed.

In 1984 old cobblestones were gradually uncovered, a bathroom altered from its 1930s style to a simple, modern style, landscaping under Michael Lehany and James Broadbent was undertaken to restore its earlier geometry and reinstate the main western front as the main focus and screen the coal wash to the west. Restoration of the slab building stables (predating 1842) also occurred. An olive grove (7000 trees) has been established by the current owners (growing olives and making extra virgin olive oil) on higher land to the southeast and north-eastern sides of the homestead in the c.1990s (Everett 2002).

Although the coal transhipment facility near Glenlee was phased out from the late 1980s due to its potential environmental impact on the Nepean River, its visual impact ont he landscape surrounding Glenlee is still substantial, though, owing to its low elevation distrubances, it is not as disruptive from the homestead group (Britton & Morris 2000:86).

In 1988 Mount Annan Botanic Garden north-west of Glenlee over the railway line was opened, administered by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney, as Australia's largest botanic garden devoted entirely to native flora. It has since been renamed the Australian Botanic Garden (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 12/2/2018).

In 1993 the Glenlee Composting Facility commenced operation on the site, producing soil mixes, mulches and topdressing material for rehabilitation of the coal facility and for the horticultural and landscaping industries (Prescott 2003).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Environment/Contact: What do we know of the Contact Environment?-Environment (Natural) Control
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. All nations - place of first contact between Aboriginal and European peoples-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Farming by emancipated convicts on land grants-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. Chinese agricultural practises-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Market gardening-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Market gardening-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Sharefarming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Orcharding-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Growing vines and maintaining vineyards-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Marking the transition from pastoralism to agriculture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming wheat and other grains-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Dairy farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Mining-Activities associated with the identification, extraction, processing and distribution of mineral ores, precious stones and other such inorganic substances. coal transport and handling-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for wool-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Rail transport-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Bridging rivers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. early settlement or worker's cottage-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Pastoral Homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Living on the land-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating convicts-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing working animals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Fencing boundaries - wooden post and rail-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Railways to inland settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Roadways to Inland Settlements-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Physical evidence of creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses, through domestic artefacts scatters, ar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living on the urban fringe-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Hamilton Hume, explorer and grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Howe, settler, grazier, magistrate-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Captain William Hovell, sailor, explorer, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Fitzpatrick, emancipated convict farmer-

Recommended management:

Prepare CMP, assess curtilage and extend SHR boundary, to include at least critical viewpoint from the entrance road/ridge to the north/east of homestead group (Prescott 2003). Ensure rural character is maintained within the viewshed of Glenlee. Ensure rural character is maintained from the point along Glenlee Road, approaching the homestead, where the first views of the group and the distant landscape setting are possible by use of the LEP zone 7 Environment Protection category. Also ensure these views are respected and maintained from along the accessway. Ensure the important direct viewline between Glenlee and the Camden Park estate ridgeline is maintained unimpeded. Ensure future uses of the nearby industrial land (including the coal mine surface facility) are of a low elevation - no higher than the existing coal loader related development - and do not intrude into the viewlines from Glenlee (Britton & Morris 2000). 1. An application for an excavation permit under S60 of the NSW Heritage Act 1977 will need to be approved by the Heritage Council or its delegate prior to undertaking works that disturb the site, or below the ground floor of Glenlee House. Discussions should be held with the Heritage Division regarding approvals for this project and their requirements, such as the possible need for in situ conservation of State-significant archaeology. 2. An Archaeological Research Design will need to be written to attach to the S60 application. This will identify the archaeological approach and methodology to be used on the site. A program of archaeological testing may be required in areas of proposed subsurface impact. 3. Depending on the results of this testing, a program of archaeological investigation and recording may be required to document the archaeological remains prior to the works. 4. Opportunities to conserve archaeological remains in situ within the SHR area should be explored. If preservation of remains in situ is not possible, a program of archaeological recording will be required. 5. An excavation report presenting the results of any archaeological program should be prepared at the end of the archaeological program. The final report needs to comply with the S60 conditions of consent (Casey & Lowe 2017:54).

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementProduce an Archaeological Management Plan (AMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP for site submitted for endorsement - relates to a Plannng Proposal seeking rezoning for urban development Mar 2 2018

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0000902 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0000905 Nov 82   
Local Environmental Plan  27 Apr 87 732
National Trust of Australia register  7769   
Register of the National Estate 327721 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCampbelltown News, The1949Glenlee - Proposed Resumption
WrittenCasey & Lowe2017Historical Archaeology Assessment: Glenlee, Menangle Park
WrittenCasey & Lowe2009Non-Indigenous Heritage Study, Menangle Park, NSW
WrittenEllsmore, Donald2010Statement of Heritage Impact - reinstatement of fire-destroyed woolshed
WrittenEverett, David2002Olives at Glenlee', in Winter in Macarthur, Issue 3(1) View detail
WrittenHigginbotham, Edward1985Glenlee House, Menangle Road, Campbelltown, NSW: site survey of archaeological remains
WrittenJohn Oultram Heritage & Design2018Glenlee Estate, Menangle Park, NSW - Conservation Management Plan Review
WrittenKass, Dr Terry2009'History of Menangle Park'
WrittenKemp, Cherry2001Glenlee, Statement of heritage impact relating to conservation of gate lodge and construction of olive processing shed
WrittenListon, Carol1988Campbelltown - the bicentennial history
WrittenLucas, Clive & McGinness, Mark2012'John Fisher - 1924-2012 - champion of the state's structures'
WrittenMusecape P/L (Chris Betteridge)2014Proposed Glenlee Precinct Rezoning: Non-Indigenous Heritage Assessment
WrittenPercival, Syd1992Chronicles of Appin, NSW
WrittenReymond, M.1978History of Glenlee, Menangle Road, Campbelltown
WrittenTropman & Tropman Architects2017Glenlee Estate, Lots 1, 2 & 3 DP713646, Glenlee Rd., Menangle Park, NSW: Conservation Management Plan
WrittenTropman & Tropman Architects2014Glenlee - European Heritage Assessment for Rezoning - Lots 1, 2 & 3 DP713646, Glenlee Road, Menangle Park
WrittenTropman & Tropman Architects; in association with Casey & Lowe, Archaeologists (Archaeological Assessment 8/2017)2017Glenlee Estate: Lots1, 2 & 3 DP713646, Glenlee Road, Menangle Park, NSW: Conservation Management Plan
WrittenWrigley, John2003Smeaton Grange and the Hume & Hovell Connection, in 'Back Then'

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045216
File number: EF14/4526; S90/6169/3


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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