Site of Ficus superba var. henneana tree | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Site of Ficus superba var. henneana tree

Item details

Name of item: Site of Ficus superba var. henneana tree
Other name/s: Cedar fig, superb fig, deciduous fig, Port Hacking fig; formerly part of Fernleigh Castle / The Ferns grounds
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Parks, Gardens and Trees
Category: Tree
Location: Lat: -33.8676663261 Long: 151.2727491730
Primary address: 3-4 Fernleigh Gardens, Rose Bay, NSW 2029
Local govt. area: Woollahra
Local Aboriginal Land Council: La Perouse
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP208880
LOT2 DP208880
LOTC DP392425
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
3-4 Fernleigh GardensRose BayWoollahra  Primary Address
20 Rawson RoadRose BayWoollahra  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 
 Private 
 Private 

Statement of significance:

This rare and magnificent specimen of Port Hacking fig (Ficus superba var. henneana) is of natural, scientific (botanical) and aesthetic heritage significance, and is one of the most important trees and notable in the Woollahra Municipality. Estimated by the National Herbarium to be as old as the late 1820s, it is considered by fig expert Dr Wee Lek Choo to be quite rare, and likely to be a natural remnant of the original vegetation of the Eastern Suburbs area, given its location, age and size, and the species' dispersed distribution. It has attained an enormous spread, and its fruit provides fodder for many of Sydney's (now endangered) grey headed flying foxes (bats). It is highly unlikely to have been planted as this species is also very rare in cultivation.

The tree is part of a remnant of the grounds of "The Ferns", later "Fernleigh Castle", an 1870s cottage, modified into a substantial 1880s sandstone mansion with originally 60 acres of land, later subdivided to 6 acres in the 1950s, and one acre lots in the 1960s. The castle with its substantial landscaped grounds was built by newspaper propietor Frank Bennett, and had been host to a number of notable guests and visitors in his ownership, tenanted later by Dame Nellie Melba, and other notable guests in later periods when used as a private hotel and banking executive training school.
Date significance updated: 16 Jan 04
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1827-1827
Physical description: Port Hacking or cedar fig (Ficus superba var. henneanan)
Magnificent and very old specimen, part of the original 'Fernleigh Gardens' estate, the only known example of this species in the municipality. (Landarc, for Woollahra Municipal Council, Register of Significant Trees).

Located in a position of great prominence on a sandstone outcrop on the western side of the ridge, overlooking Rose Bay. This is a position of visual significance, particularly from the harbour and the approach through Rose Bay along New South Head Road. This fig's stature and canopy is not large by the standard of other figs in the Municipality. However this is most likely the result of limiting factors such as shallow soils in this location and exposure to southerly winds (ibid, for WMC).

Height: c16m
Spread: c36m east to west; 28m north-south
Multi-stemmed specimen with stems straddling the site and adjacent properties.
Combined trunk diameter exceeds two metres.
Young and healthy tree, considered against the maximum potential life expectancy for this genus.
Based on the synconium being in pairs, the relatively-small size of fruit and presence of a drip tip (to the leaf) there is a reasonable likelihood that the earlier identification (of Ficus superba var.henneana) is now incorrect. Based on the features observed at the two inspections, it would appear that the tree is a white fig, Ficus virens...probably planted after the first (colonial) settlement in Queensland had established and more than likely some time in the latter half of the 1800s or very early 1900s (The Arborist Network, 2016, 3).

This rare and magnificent specimen of Port Hacking fig (Ficus superba var. henneana). Estimated by the National Herbarium to be as old as the late 1820s, it is considered by fig expert Dr Wee Lek Choo (who is revising the genus "Ficus" for the "Flora of Australia") to be quite rare, and likely to be a natural remnant of the original vegetation of this area, given its location, age and size, and the species' dispersed distribution. It has attained an enormous spread, and its fruit provides fodder for many of Sydney's (now endangered) grey headed flying foxes (bats).

It is highly unlikely to have been planted as this species is also very rare in cultivation. It certainly predates subdivision of the Fernleigh Gardens estate and the nearby houses.

The tree's root zone and canopy spread cover at least parts of the sections of 20 Rawson Road, 3-3A and 4 Fernleigh Gardens, with a radius of at least 9 metres (1987). 5 Fernleigh Gardens site is approximately 50% covered by the tree's canopy and root zone (as corrected by Rappaport, 2010).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Some lopping in early 1980s of parts of the canopy due to adjacent development, in 1987-8 some damage to roots and stone wall around base of tree when installing swimming pool and plumbing at 4 Fernleigh Gardens.
Date condition updated:16 Jan 04
Modifications and dates: 1831 60 acre estate
1874 cottage built "The Ferns"
1881-1892 cottage adapted and expanded into "Fernleigh Castle", gatehouse/caretaker's cottage near gates to New South Head Road, substantial gardens including 'forest of trees', lawns, and harbour views. Sandstone gate pillars and iron palisade fence to New South Head Road.

Subdivided on several occasions;
1919 to create 13 residential lots around the boundary of the Fernleigh property;
1953 to create the road Fernleigh Gardens and 11 separate lots. The Ficus
superba was situated on Lot 4 DP 25379 in this subdivision.

1955 Lot 4 (4 Fernleigh Gardens) was re-subdivided into 3 lots (Lots A B & C in DP 392425) with the
tree situated on Lot C (20 Rawson Road). Lot B became 3A Fernleigh Gardens, and Lot A
becarne 4 Fernleigh Gardens.This configuration remains today
(other than a minor boundary adjustment in 1960)
and the tree overhangs the properties of 3 and 3A Fernleigh Gardens (Rappaport, 2010).

C1920 7 acre remnant estate. Lessee Dame Nellie Melba cut down some of the trees to improve harbour views.
1951 6 acres subdivided and sold, leaving Castle on 1 acre lot, still with substantial trees and gardens. Castle vacant and vandalised.
1954-66 converted to private hotel, restoration work to castle and grounds/garden. Parts of the grounds were sold off including the tennis court. Swimming pool, cottage suite behind castle added.
1966- run by Commercial Banking Co. as staff training college.

9/7/1987 HC approved a swimming pool & spa to be constructed at 4 Fernleigh Gardens, shallow end located near tree roots to minimise excavation.

17/4//1989 HC approved extensions to existing house at 4 Fernleigh Gardens on the northern side boundary of the tree (and part of the SHR curtilage), extending the rear of this house to two storeys, reroofing and a new front verandah. Council's landscape architect advised that these works would not appear to compromise the tree's integrity. Condition placed on avoidance of impacts within root zone, and need for separate application for any canopy lopping.
Further information: ICO placed 7/5/1987 expired 14/5/1988.
Current use: grounds of private residences
Former use: Aboriginal land, colonial grant, part of grounds private residence(s), private hotel, bank staff training college

History

Historical notes: The fig tree is dated to c.1827 and is probably a remnant of pre-European settlement Eastern Suburbs vegetation.

In 1831 Samuel Breakwell of the City of Cork, Ireland was granted 60 acres of land at Rose Bay, which he promptly sold. The land was so remote from settlement, that it was not until 1874 that the then owner, Charles Warman Roberts built himself a cottage named "the Ferns". He was a member of the family who established and conducted the famous Roberts Hotel in Market Street, Sydney, until it closed in the early 1960s.

The Ferns was built on land that was part of the Tivoli estate (Rappaport, 2010).

In 1881 the property, known as "Fernleigh", was sold to Frank Bennett, proprieter of the Sydney newspaper "the Evening News". Bennett is known to have spent heavily to have Fernleigh enlarged and remodelled into its present, a replica of a Scottish castle (now known as "Fernleigh Castle" at (now) 5 Fernleigh Gardens). This work took place between 1881 and 1892. The original stone cottage, which had been extensively enlarged, was not demolished. It was incorporated in the castle and forms the present lounge room, dining room and principal's office. The original hardwood flooring in the present lounge and dining rooms had been dressed with an adze. It was still in perfect condition when carpeted over in the early 1960s. The caretaker's cottage in Victorian Gothic style remains although considerably modified, was built by Bennett near the entrance to the drive on New South Head Road. A photo of 1910 shows this cottage and the entry gates and drive, with sandstone gate piers and what appears to be an iron palisade fence to New South Head Road, and dense tree plantings including a Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla).

Shortly before 1920 Fernleigh was leased for two years by Dame Nellie Melba, opera diva, who caused a mild uproar by having some of the trees cut down to widen the view of the harbour. At that time the 7 acres of land extended to New South Head Road and the castle was approached through a magnificent drive flanked by beautiful lawns and gardens.

In 1920 the property was bought by Mrs E M C Watt, wife of New Zealand racehorse owner, Edward James Watt who had settled in Australia and had extensive grazing interests.

A 1943 aerial photograph shows the fig with its canopy approximately 25% of its current stage (sic: extent) and with an Araucaria growing immediately to the south of it. At that time the tree was located on the curtilage of Fernleigh Castle (The Arborist Network, 2016, 3).

E J Watt died in 1942 but his wife lived on here until her death in 1950.

In April 1951 it was sold to a syndicate which subdivided and sold about 6 acres of land lying between the castle and New South Head Road. Shortly afterwards the remainder was bought by Mr William Buckingham, director of the well known Oxford Street store, Buckinghams Ltd..

When Buckingham's original plans fell through he tried to sell the property without success. At this stage Fernleigh was vacant and became vandalised. A plan to sell it to the Government of Czechoslovakia as their consulate was well underway when the Petrov affair blew up and wrecked the project. The British Airline BOAC decided to buy it as their Sydney HQ but the sudden failure of their early Comet aircraft forced a radical change of plans. Architects were called in to test the walls and the general layout of the building with the idea of converting it into five self-contained flats. Masons had actually picked testing holes in the sandstone walls when this plan was abandoned.

At the same time a charitable order of the Roman Catholic Church had been toying with the idea of buying the Castle but had not been able to reach a decision. Towards the end of 1954 Mr Bruce H Jackson was driving along New South Head Road when he saw a notice offering second hand shop fittings for sale. Jackson, a builder, did not want shop fittings but had a friend who did. He found the fittings stored in the now slightly depressing vacant Fernleigh Castle. Jackson was taken with the castle and bought it from Buckingham. On the same day as he exchanged contracts, the Catholic Church decided to make an offer to buy it.

A 1951 Sunday Telegraph description of the castle noted it was set back in large grounds surrounded by a forest of trees and shrubs that effectively hid it from public view (from New South Head Road) in an 'enchanting garden world of its own'. 'Although it is set in a heavily populated residential area surrounded by other homes you can't see one neighbouring house. But you can look straight ahead across a breathtaking vista of Sydney Harbour'. It also noted the property had outbuildings such as the gardener's cottage (there were two permanent gardeners), chauffeurs' quarters and a workshop.

Jackson conducted the castle as a private hotel from 1954-1962 and worked on its restoration and modification. He sold part of the grounds including the tennis court, to raise funds. He built the swimming pool, the cottage suite at the rear of the main building and restored the garden on the remaining land. He bought sandstock bricks from W C Wentworth's old home in Phillip Street, Sydney to make the sunken garden alcove. From historic St. Malo (Hunters Hill) and the old Stewart-Dawson home in Darling Point he bought bricks, fittings and shutters to give the right character and atmosphere to the cottage suite. The lamp post decorating the entrance came from the Bourke Street Presbyterian Church.

In 1955 Lot 4 of Fernleigh Gardens Estate was re-subdivided into 3 lots (A, B & C of DP 329425). Lot A became 4 Fernleigh Gardens. Lot B became 3A Fernleigh Gardens and Lot C became 20 Rawson Road (ibid, 2016, 8).

20 Rawson Road, one of these subdivided lots, was a vacant lot in 1953, part of the larger Fernleigh house and estate. In 1956 Buckingham purchased 20 Rawson Road. He had a house built on this lot post-1956 which had some characteristics of mid-twentieth century suburban development and was a relatively substantial example in an affluent suburb, with simple and limited detailing (Urbis, 2016, 8, 15).

In 1962 the Jacksons sold Fernleigh Castle to C G Lloyd and his wife who transferred it in 1963 to Franco-Swiss (Asia) P/L.

In August 1964 Mark Richard Cotter and his wife bought it, and sold it in 1966 to the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Ltd., who established it as a staff training college for its executives on 7 March 1966.

The castle has been the host of distinguished guests over the years: English actors Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, theatre identity Robert Helpmann, English writer Dame Edith Sitwell, the Ambassador of Spain. The 'Shirley Bassey Lodge' beside the swimming pool was named after the world famous singer who once stayed in this cottage in the castle's grounds.(newspaper article, uncredited/dated, on file).

A 1966 article noted that 'the forest is not there now but some beautiful old trees still adorn the grounds. The isolation has gone, the chauffeur has gone and so has the second gardener.' (Fernleigh Castle - its history - undated and sourced document on file).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural - Coasts and coastal features supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Natural - pre European settlement vegetation-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Natural - site important native fauna habitat or food source-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Special tree or trees-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Innkeeping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Sydney and Australian Landmark-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places How are significant places marked in the landscape by, or for, different groups-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Science-Activities associated with systematic observations, experiments and processes for the explanation of observable phenomena Researching botany and botanical processes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Victorian era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Urban residential estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the suburbs-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - colonial period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. At home with a national leader-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation musical gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Frank Bennett, newspaper proprietor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Dame Nellie Melba, international opera singer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Mrs E M C Watt, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Buckingham, storekeeper-

Recommended management:

Extreme care is to be taken to avoid or minimise disturbance to either the canopy, root zone (eg: excavation) and rock bank around the immediate root bole/trunk of this tree. If disturbance/ excavation cannot be avoided, no roots of the tree greater than 100mm in diameter are to be severed without the prior inspection of a certified Arborist and prior approval of Woollahra Municipal Council and the Heritage Council. Any roots of the tree which are encountered and must be severed must be cleanly cut with a pruning saw and the would must be treated with a tree surgery sealant. Compaction and paving of the tree's root zone are to be avoided or minimised, and paving (if approved) should be semi-permeable or permeable to allow moisture and air penetration to the tree's root zone. (a suggested condition of any approval within/adjoining the root zone of the tree is): No building activities shall be carried out within or adjacent to the root zone of the tree, including the storage of building material, erection of temporary builders sheds and movement of plant, machinery or materials to ensure the health and vigour of the tree are not compromised during the course of building works. Regular selective branch pruning should be undertaken to redirect major branch growth away from nearby houses, and redirect consequent leaf fall and bat droppings.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):

Area shown unhatched on plan H.C. 1580.

(a) any activity normally controlled by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977;

Area shown hatched on plan H.C. 1580
(a) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(b) Garden maintenance including cultivation, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, by means not affecting the subject tree.
May 13 1988
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0057802 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0057813 May 88 0872730
Local Environmental PlanWoollahra LEP 201431021 Jun 14   
Local Environmental PlanFicus Superba Var. Henneana (Cedar Fig)LEP199510 Mar 95 28 

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenInnovation Planning2010Statement of Environmental Effects - Proposed Tree Pruning - Ficus superba 20 Rawsons Road and overhanging Lot D395692 3A Fernleigh Gardens, Rose Bay
WrittenRappaport P/L, July 20102010Statement of Heritage Impact - Proposed Selective Pruning of Deciduous Fig (Ficus superba) overhanging 3A Fernleigh Gardens, Rose Bay Overhanging 3A FERNLEIGH GARDENS, ROSE BAY
WrittenRobinson, Les2003'Ficus superba var. Henneana - deciduous fig', in 'Field Guide to the Native Plants of Sydney'
WrittenThe Arborist Network (Mark Hartley)2016Tree Report: 20 Rawson Road, Rose Bay, CD1624B
Writtenuncredited Fernleigh Castle - its history
WrittenUrban Tree Management, 26/3/20102010Report - Arboricultural Assessment - 4 Fernleigh Gardens, Rose Bay

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045217
File number: 10/19749; S91/02771


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