Fernleigh | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Fernleigh

Item details

Name of item: Fernleigh
Other name/s: York House, Mandalay
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -34.0601946302 Long: 151.1329185380
Primary address: 44-46 Fernleigh Road, Caringbah South, NSW 2229
Parish: Sutherland
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sutherland
Local Aboriginal Land Council: La Perouse
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT122 DP825842
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
44-46 Fernleigh RoadCaringbah SouthSutherlandSutherlandCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Paul and Victoria HaynesPrivate 

Statement of significance:

Fernleigh is believed by Sutherland historians to have been completed in 1821 for Thomas Laycock Junior, who, while himself mostly resident at his property 'Kelvin' at Bringelly, built the house for his second wife Margaret Connell and the six children of his first marriage to Isabella Bunker of 'Collingwood', Liverpool. The home is believed to be the first constructed in the Sutherland area and has been an envied point of interest for 100 years.
Date significance updated: 17 Aug 12
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1858-1860
Physical description: Property:
The property is (now) situated down a narrow Right-of-Way and behind the excavated rockface on the western boundary with its primary orientation looking out to Burraneer Bay. It is one allotment back from the waterfront, which was originaly part of Fernleigh's site. It presents a striking landmark when viewed from the opposite side of the bay. The site and house can be viewed from many locations along the waterfront and from the western side of Burraneer Bay peninsular (Cowell, 2008, 17).
The property has water access. The Three Pines Boatshed, part of the original holding and now called Burraneer Bay Marina, was subdivided off in the 1970s. (SMH, 2005).

The site the house now stands on grades steeply from the western boundary to the boundary of the marina and car park which was originally part of the waterfront to (i.e. land of) Fernleigh Estate. The property was part of an original purchase of 40 acres, extending on the south-eastern side of Gannons Road south to the tip of the point. (ibid, 2008, 15).

The remainder of the curtilage around the house consists of formal lawns to the front of the house and mature trees to the north and south boundaries. The geometric pattern of front lawns and pathways were part of the grounds prior to the c1930s aerial photos and with the thick bushland setting they formed a lush green setting surrounding the house. The layout of the grounds dating from the use of the property as a private Zoo (1986+) have been largely lost with the subdivisions on the east and west of the site. The original access from Fernleigh Road curved in towards the house from the north-west corner of the site. This access was lost when the allotments fronting Fernleigh Road were subdivided around the 1960s and the right-of-way was formed down the south side of the site to the marina (ibid, 2008, 17).

House:
The layout of the main part of the house follows a typical square Georgian format. There are four rooms divided down the middle by a wide hallway. Originally the two rooms on the southern side were bedrooms and the two on the northern side were dining and sitting rooms. Walls are constructed from 18" (45cm) hand-hewn sandstone blocks. The slate roof is original. Chimney pots also are Victorian. (Watt, Bruce, 'Magnificent Fernleigh', Sutherland Shire Historical Society, volume 9, no.4, 11/2006, quoted in Enviroscience 2012, 20).

The house's details suggest several stages of alteration / extension and repair. It has seven bedrooms. The stone was cut on the property, and signs of the quarrying may still be seen at the back of the house. A stone lintel over the front door says 1821. The timber used was cedar, obtained from a small stand on a nearby ridge. The dormer windows do not appear in an early photograph of the home, while the line of the original veranda which extended across the eastern facade only may be seen under the current veranda. The courtyard between the home and its formerly separate kitchen block has been enclosed to create a large sitting room.

Beneath each of the main rooms is a cellar with a trap door. This construction created coolness in summer as well as providing cool-storage near the kitchen area. The kitchen wing was originally separated from the living area by a flag-stoned courtyard, but many years ago this was enclosed by a previous owner, and the flagged stone flooring of both kitchen and courtyard were wood-floored.

A ballroom was added in 1920 and an art deco bathroom in the 1930s (SMH, 2005).
Modifications and dates: c1905 or prior:
significant alterations to the house - verandah extended down southern and northern sides with corrugated asbestos sheeting.
Horse stalls on southern side rear were removed and the servants' quarters which originally were in a separate building were roofed over and joined to the main building, creating a large living room. Dormer windows were added to the front, to create two small attic bedrooms (Envirosciene, 2012, 20).

The main living room has had a 1920s makeover (Watt, 2006, quoted in ibid, 2012, 20). A ballroom was added in 1920 and an Art Deco bathroom in the 1930s (or 1940s)(ibid, 20).

1940s: the Alcocks cleared a considerable amount of bushland from the site, renaming the house 'Fernleigh' (from Mandalay).

1970s: the Three Pines Boatshed, part of the original holding and now called Burraneer Bay Marina, was subdivided off (SMH, 2005). Errol Alcock owned and managed the 'Three Pines Boat Service' (now a marina immediately in front of the House), running this for about 40 years.

1986+ site run as a private Zoo for many years under the Alcocks' ownership. Open days held to raise funds for the Red Cross and charities (Cowell, 2008, 15).

1992: marina subdivided with the subdivision of the allotment immediately behind the house. Two houses built on the rear allotment between 1992 and c.1994 (Cowell, 2008, 15).
Further information: Fernleigh Estate has historic connections with Kelvin Park estate, Bringelly & Collingwood Estate, Liverpool.
Current use: Residence
Former use: Aboriginal land, rural farm retreat, residence, boatshed

History

Historical notes: Fernleigh is believed by Sutherland historians to have been completed in 1821 for Thomas Laycock Jr., who, while himself mostly resident at his property 'Kelvin' at Bringelly, built the house for his second wife Margaret Connell and the six children of his first marriage to Isabella Bunker of 'Collingwood', Liverpool. The home is believed to be the first constructed in the Sutherland area and has been an envied point of interest for 100 years.

(Envirospace, 2012 (13) considers that the above is incorrect: that the Thomas Connell Laycock (the name noted in an article 'Magnificent Fernleigh', by Bruce Watt, Sutherland Shire Historical Society, volume 9, no. 4, 11/2006) is a typographical error and the correct name is in fact John Connell Laycock (ibid, 13).

The first Crown Land sales took place in the Caringbah-Miranda area (then unnamed) in 1856-88. During this period (in 1858) John Connell Laycock bought this (parcel number 58) block of land, Lot 13, 40 acres, for forty five pounds ($A75). He also bought other large tracts of land in the Caringbah/Burraneer Bay areas, as did his uncle John Connell Junior (J.S.Parsons Structural Consultants, 2012, 3). John Connell Laycock was a Member of the NSW Legislative Assembly, serving on no less than fifteen committees over a period of seven years. He also owned land in Yamba and was a Quarantine keeper at Bradley's Head in 1878. It was through him that Thomas Holt was first acquainted with Sutherland Shire. Laycock and his son escorted Thomas Holt around his Shire properties and Holt liked what he saw. Laycock was grandson of John Connell, an original settler at Kurnell. The name Kurnell is acknowledged as a corruption of the Connell family name (Envirospace, 2012, 13-14).

In 1860 Laycock sold it to the Hon. Thomas Holt MLA. Holt began acquiring as much land in the Shire as he could. Eventually he controlled most of it (c12,500 acres), including the majority of Laycock's estate and the land where Fernleigh is located. The date on which a large portion of his Sutherland Estate was acquired was 31/12/1862. Holt was a life member of the NSW Legislative Council and served on over twenty committees. He was also a successful wool buyer, investing in property, and farmed near Liverpool. He was a director of gold mining, insurance and railway companies. Throughout his life he acquired pastoral interests with others totalling 3 million acres in NSW and Queensland from 1851-80. Retired from business as a wool buyer in 1854 he retained pastoral interest and most directorships. He was Colonial Treasurer for a brief time. He sold some of his runs after the gold rush and in 1861 bought an estate extending from Botany Bay to Port Hacking including James Cook's landing place, where he erected an obelisk in the centennary year. He also tried raising sheep on pastures sown with imported grass and then cattle, scientific oyster-farming, timber-getting and coal-mining, each without success. He campaigned for the damming of the George's River to supply Sydney with water but the Government rejected his scheme (Australian Dictionay of Biography, 1972, volume 4, H.E.Holt, an Energetic Colonist, Melbourne)(in ibid, 2012, 14-15).

A report Holt commissioned his property manager, R.C.Walker to prepare in 1868 on the extent and viability of his large estate summarised the Burraneer Bay property thus:
"40 acres on east side of Dolan's Bay, in Burrameer Bay. This is a block of very thickly timbered land, with a great deal of scrub on it. Nothing has yet been done to it either in ringbarking or scrubbing. The soil is ironstone clay and sandy soil but very rocky. There is a fine view of the Port Hacking River from it and it would make a very good building site" (ibid, 15).

Holt sold it in 1873 to Charles York. The locality sketch attached to the cerficiate of title does not indicate any improvements on the site. York bought the land for a 'country retreat', taking perhaps one or two years to complete a stone cottage (ibid, 16). He originally named it 'York House' and it was in the Georgian Revival style. Charles York died in 1880. His widow Emma transferred title in 1883 to Thomas James York of Pyrmont Bridge (ibid, 18).

The Gannon family acquired the property in 1888 (ibid, 18). It is believed they altered the building and renamed it 'Fernleigh' (in 1889)(ibid, 18). William Gannon owned the Union Hotel in Tempe and his wife was proprietor of Petty's Hotel nearby. His father Michael Gannon and his sons William and Joseph were very supportive of all sporting activities held in the area. Gannon's Forest now known as Hurstville, was named after this family (ibid, 18). They owned it until early 1905 when the estate was again subdivided and sold. The remaining portion of the land containing the Fernleigh residence was still some 8 acres in area with an orchard north of the house and several large paddocks to the south and west. Members of the Gannon family have resided here for a period of time (J.S.Parsons Structural Consultants, 2012, 3-4).
Fernleigh was shown in a 1/1905 estate vendor plan (the first to show improvements on the property) with balconies wrapping around two sides and a substantial rear extension, now the formal living room, bathroom and pantry, but not the sunroom. An outbuilding to its west, being the kitchen and servants' quarters, which have now been incorporated into the house, an orchard to its north (on what is now 38-42b Fernleigh Road), a boat shed further north, in front of what is now 2 Coonabarabran Place, three small boatsheds further north, in front of what is now 1 & 3 Coonabarabran Place, stables on what is now the eastern side of 60 and 62 Fernleigh Road, various sheds along what is now the southern part of 62 and 64a Fernleigh Road, and further south what appear to be animal pens on what is now the eastern part of 68 and 70 Fernleigh Road (ibid, 18-19).

The house had significant alterations in this period. The verandah was extended down the southern and northern sides using corrugated asbestos sheeting. Horse stalls at the southern side rear were removed and servants' quarters which originally were in a separate building were roofed over and joined to the main building, creating a large living room. Dormer windows were added to the house's front to create two small attic bedrooms (ibid, 20).

In March 1905 Mrs Gannon sold lots 8,9 & 10 to James Taylor Austin. There were no improvements on this part of the land. He is recorded as living at Port Hacking in 7/1920. This may relate to the Burraneer Bay address. Mrs Gannon (who was living in the two hotels in Tempe, died on 5/9/1906. Much of the property's contents were sold off. In December 1908 her remaining lands were transferred to Robert Owen Gribben, her nephew. He sold various lots until his death in 1910. Part Lot 1 (the subject site) was sold to Charles John Miller on 15/4/1910; part to Otto Fredrick Wunderlich on the same date. Wunderlich was a well-known Sydney socialite and managing director of Wunderlich Ltd. (ibid, 20). Part Lot 1 was also sold to Edwin Crescence Cook on the same date. He was a Lieutenant in the NSW Defence Force in 1897. Part Lot 1 was sold again to George Cornish Dwyer of Glebe on 17/4/1911 (ibid, 20). By 1914 Edwin Crescence Cook held the parcel of land that is the subject site (Burraneer Bay marina) and Fernleigh. On 11/9/1914 it was sold to Rose Annie Isabella Rofe, wife oa John Rofe, Sydney solicitor. The Rofes did not reside at Fernleigh, or not full time. Until she died in 1931, their residential address was in Stanmore. Mr Rofe died three weeks later (ibid, 22).

In 1932 the property passed to two of their sons, Alfred and Edgar, both solicitors. In 1935 it was sold to Harry Peel, merchant. He took over an importing business of his father's, living in Coogee at that time - the family were keen sailors. Sinec the early 1930s there has been a regular motor boat race from Rose Bay (and later, Broken Bay) to Port Hacking for which the 'Harry Peel Trophy' was awarded. Harry and his wife were both members of the Port Hacking branch of the Royal Motor Yacht Club, where they actively raced their speed boat, 'Baltimore'. He resided in Helensburgh (ibid, 23).
Harry Peel may have been related to the Gannon family by marriage (ibid, 4).

Fernleigh Road was extended further south to loop around and join up with Gannons Road. The subdivision pattern was greatly fragmented undergoing major changes from the 1905 subdivision. During this period Fernleigh underwent several changes with a ballroom being added in 1920 and an Art Deco style bathroom in the 1930s (J.S.Parsons Structural Consultants, 2012, 4).

Mr & Mrs Errol Alcott bought the property from Harry Peel in 1947 and it has been in the Alcott family since then.

The property has water access.

Part of Fernleigh is known to have operated as a commercial marina and slipway since the early 1940s. At that time the site was known as 'The Three Pines Boatshed'. There is anecdotal evidence of the slipping of vessels from 1949. The first tender owned by the boatshed was built in 1945 and is still in use by the marina today. It is believed that during the 1950s and 1960s the NSW Police regularly called upon the vessel to assist with search and rescue activities on the Port Hacking River (ibid, 4).

The Three Pines Boatshed part of the original holding, now called Burraneer Bay Marina, was subdivided off in the 1970s. In 1976 the first marina jetty and mooring pens were consrtucted. The first vessel to lease one of the moorings is still there today. A number of marina support facilities are provided, such as vessel maintenance, slipway facilities, fuel and sewer pump-out. The marine presently contains 72 over-water commercial berths, 31 swing moorings distributed throughout Burraneer Bay and slipway capacity on two slipways for up to 3 vessels at any time. The marina is presently home for two NSW Maritime (Roads & Maritime Services) vessels that regularly patrol the Port Hacking River (ibid, 4).

Apparently the launch of "Tie me Kangaroo Down, Sport", the quintessential Australian folk song of Alcott family friend Rolf Harris, was held on Fernleigh's front lawn (SMH, 2005).

The present Fernleigh Road was named after the house.

A proposed additional 35 new berths and refurbishment of the marina was proposed in 2012.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Living on the land-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Outlying settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Vernacular hamlets and settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the suburbs-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Garden-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping coastal settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural Estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A quiet Rural District-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on the land-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - colonial period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a bushland setting-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Holidaying near the sea-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living and working at home-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living on the urban fringe-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. John Connell Laycock, MLA, businesman, farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Laycock Jr., soldier, explorer, businessman, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Thomas Holt MLA, businessman, landholder-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentConservation Management Plan, 17 march 2008 Oct 14 2007
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0030202 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0030225 May 84 84 
Local Environmental Plan  15 Dec 00 16213333
National Trust of Australia register  7509   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
National Trust Suburban Register19867509National Trust of Australia (NSW)  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenChancellor, J., in 'Title Deeds' in 'Domain'2005Fernleigh untied, Sport
WrittenEnvirospace P/L2012Statement of Heritage Significance & Statement of Heritage Impact For: Extensions to an Existing Marina at Burraneer Bay Marina, 48 Fernleigh Road, Caringbah 2229
WrittenErrol Alcott BEM; Ivey Alcott, BEM, JP; H.Hutton Neve Fernleigh - the House of Australian History; The home of Australian flora
WrittenGlen Cowell Heritage Services P/L2008Conservation Management Plan for Fernleigh, 44-46 Fernleigh Road, Caringbah
WrittenGlen Cowell Heritage Services P/L2007Heritage impact statement for the property Fernleigh at 44-46 Fernleigh Road, Caringbah
WrittenJ.S.Parsons Structural Consultants P/L2012Statement of Environmental Effects for proposed upgrading of Burraneer Bay Marina's existing slipways and fixed timber jetty linkwater along with an additional Marina arm

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045244
File number: 09/4925; S90/05966 & HC 32339


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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