Bargo Railway Viaduct | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Bargo Railway Viaduct

Item details

Name of item: Bargo Railway Viaduct
Other name/s: Bargo River Railway Viaduct
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Bridge/ Viaduct
Location: Lat: -34.2366088361 Long: 150.5798607140
Primary address: Main Southern railway 96.265 kms, Bargo, NSW 2574
Local govt. area: Wollondilly
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal

Boundary:

The listing boundary is the area on which the bridge stands including supports, abutments and earthworks and the track formation leading to it for a distance of 20 metres in all directions from the construction.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Main Southern railway 96.265 kmsBargoWollondilly  Primary Address
Remembrance Driveway (adjacent to)BargoWollondilly  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government20 Oct 98

Statement of significance:

The bridge has significance because it is part of the major duplication of the Main South Railway, the use of brick construction compliments the natural environment, the duplication work contributed significantly to the continued development of South Western New South Wales, commercially through freight trains and socially through faster, better passenger trains and in the 'era of brick arch construction', 1910-23, there were around 90 railway sites where brick arches singly and in multiples, for clear spans from 6.1 m (20 feet) to 13.1 m (43 feet) were built. But this viaduct has a set of larger brick arches at 15.2 m (50 feet) clear spans. The bridge retains its original fabric and structure.
Date significance updated: 16 Mar 06
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Engineering staff of NSWGR
Builder/Maker: Day Labour
Construction years: 1919-1919
Physical description: A large brick arch viaduct consisting of five 15.2 m (50 feet) spans over the Bargo River.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good.
Date condition updated:16 Mar 06
Current use: Viaduct that carries Main South Railway
Former use: Aboriginal land

History

Historical notes: By the early 1900s much of the original single track railways in New South Wales had become inadequate for railway operations, particularly the busy Main Lines (South, West and North) through the Great Dividing Range. Plans were made to duplicate the tracks and at the same time ease the original steep grades and sharp curves, usually all achieved by deviation works.

It was a major programme beginning in 1910 and continuing to 1923. The dominant bridge building material was bricks, mostly from the 1912 State Brickworks at Homebush and mostly in the form of brick arches. This was due to (a) a general lack of expensive imported steel and (b) a long standing government policy to see local materials used as much as possible. Even for short spans, 6.1 m (20 feet) and 9.14 m (30 feet), where a simple steel plate web girder would have been the norm, brick arches were built.

The quantity of bricks used in the programme was enormous so the period 1910-23 could be aptly described as the ‘era of brick arch construction’. Thereafter, locally produced steel, from Newcastle and Port Kembla, displaced the use of bricks for superstructures, but large quantities of bricks continued to be used for piers, abutments and wings walls.

In the duplication programme, that of the Main South was the largest. It had been duplicated to Picton by 1892, then from 1913 to 1922 duplication was extended to Cootamundra, a distance of 343 kms (213 miles), in sections but not always sequentially. For example the 52 km first section from Picton to Bowral was one of the last completed in 1919 whereas the 89 kms section, Bowral to Goulburn, had been completed in 1915.

A design policy of the duplication work was to eliminate level crossings, consequently there are as many underbridges and overbridges for roads as there are underbridges for waterways. Fast, safe, through running was to be the new standard for goods and passenger trains.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of institutions - productive and ornamental-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building the railway network-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Rail transport-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Bridging rivers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impact of railways on suburban development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on rural development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th Century infrastructure-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and administering rail networks-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The bridge is part of the major duplication of the Main South Railway.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The bridge is readily accessible from the Old Hume Highway set in a natural environment.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The duplication work contributed significantly to the continued development of South Western New South Wales, commercially through freight trains and socially through faster, better passenger trains.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
In the ‘era of brick arch construction’, 1910-23, there were around 90 railway sites where brick arches singly and in multiples, for clear spans from 6.1 m (20 feet) to 13.1 m (43 feet) were built. These structures depend on the bricklayers skills.

But this viaduct is one of only a few with larger clear spans of 15.2 m (50 feet) or more.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
A good representative example of brick arch construction.
Integrity/Intactness: The bridge retains its original fabric and structure.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0102402 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental Plan 199123 Aug 91 11907234

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Rail Infrastructure Corporation s.170 Register2003 Rail Infrastructure Corporation  Yes

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045265


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