Raywell | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Raywell

Item details

Name of item: Raywell
Other name/s: Carnegie House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.8466981163 Long: 151.1850311450
Primary address: 144 Louisa Road, Birchgrove, NSW 2041
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Leichhardt
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP235461
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
144 Louisa RoadBirchgroveLeichhardtPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private06 Apr 99

Statement of significance:

Raywell, constructed in 1885 is a single storey Victorian period residence of bungalow form situated in a prominent position on the ridge of Long Nose Point. It is recognised as the only building with obvious architectural merit in the locality (Branch Managers Report 23 July 1980)
Date significance updated: 17 Dec 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Physical description: Raywell is a classical single storey Victorian period residence of bungalow form dating from c.1883 with a later two storey Victorian addition of terrace style house form at the rear.

It is sited prominently on the ridge of Long Nose point with views to both east and west. The frontage to Louisa Road is bounded by an attractive sandstone and palisade fence.

It was built by Duncan Smith and sold in 1885 to produce merchant William Ainsworth. It became known as 'Raywell' during the occupancy of Miss Rachel Cole Wells who lived there from 1888 to 1928. (Lawrence & Warne, 1995, 65).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
1980: the original roof cladding has been replaced; much original interior fabric survives. Internally and at the rear the building has suffered from vandalism and its conversion into flats, but many many interior details have survived. The marble fireplaces have been lost through theft (Branch Manager's report, 193/80).
Date condition updated:07 Feb 08
Modifications and dates: 1980: Convert existing multi-unit flat dwelling into a single residence, including:
- restore existing fireplaces, windows, architraves, skirtings and doors;
- restore north and east verandah and cast iron balustrade;
- replace stair with new cedar staircase following original location;
- enlarge northern window in bedroom 1 on first floor to match style of window below it on ground floor;
- install 3 new bathrooms;
- provide new kitchen in north-west wing and install new northern window and doors;
- provide an open air car parking space in south-west corner of site.

1987: first floor alterations to the front interior of the rear wing of the building
1993: approval for garage relocation
Current use: Private residence
Former use: Private residence; flats

History

Historical notes: Birchgrove:
The Birchgrove part (north-east) of the Balmain peninsula was known to the Wangal as Yur(r)ulbin or 'swift running waters'. It is referred to as 'waters meet' as it is where Port Jackson's waters meet the Parramatta River at the harbour's narrowest.
This small area of Balmain peninsula was excluded from Dr William Balmain's 1800 grant. Then called Whitfield's Farm, its now Birchgrove, running from Snails Bay (named in 1810), to Long Nose Point. When the point was named, a rocky nose-like protuberance jutted into the harbor. This has eroded.

30 acres were granted in 1796 to George Whitfield, a private in the NSW Corps. He was required to pay annual 'quit rent' of one shilling after five years, provide timber for naval purposes, live on and cultivate the land. He is said to have established an orange grove on the point. It passed through several hands before being acquired by John Birch, paymaster of the 73rd (Macquarie's) Regiment, in 1810. Birch built Birch Grove House on his estate on the ridge', now Louisa Road. Birch had a number of activities: he kept a town house at Charlotte Square (now Grosvenor Street), was involved with shipping in Hobart, kept race horses and formed a pastoral partnership with Ellis Bent, the colony's judge-advocate.

After 1814 Birch Grove estate was sold and tenanted by a string of people. One was Captain William Deloitte, skipper of his own barque, the Florentine (later retiring from the sea, an agent for this ship, and a merchant) and whose son we'll re-meet at Wyoming later. It was not subdivided after Deloitte's lease expired (1856) until 1860 (by developer and then-owner Didier Joubert, better known from Hunters Hill which he developed with his brother Jules. Louisa Road is named after Joubert's wife; Numa Street for his son; Rose Street, his daughter and Ferdinand Street, his nephew). The area's sandstone attracted quarrymen and masons were among the first buyers. Few 'villa lots' sold. A syndicate bought much of the remaining estate. A glowing advertisement of 1878 (a contemporary report described Snail's Bay as a 'miniature Bay of Naples') failed to find buyers, but all lots sold by 1882.

The alignment of Louisa Road was crucial to the subdivision. It had to be aligned along the central ridge the spit to create the maximum number of lots, in a single row, with deep water access. Also it had been planned not to impinge on Birch Grove House. Hence the road's 'bend'. Birch Grove House was retained, with a summer house added, on a large waterfront block.

36 lots were bought by the NSW Government for the Birch Grove Recreation Ground (later Birchgrove Oval). Public concerns about pollution and health led agitation to reclaim Snail's Bay. A trust was formed (Trustees included architect and Councillor Edward Buchanan and Quarton Deloitte) in 1882 and architect Ferdinand Reuss Jnr. (active in Glebe & remembered in Birchgrove's Reuss Street) prepared a plan of landscaped gardens, walks, shrubbery and 'big oval cricket ground'. Reclamation reduced Birch Grove House's garden, but improved the area. The park was fenced in 1884 and had a practice cricket pitch by 1885. By 1887 a dyke wall was formed to reclaim the swamp. In that year the caretaker, Thomas Rose, a man of 'horticultural experience' and two men continued laying out the grounds. The 1890s depression halted work, which resumed in 1897. By 1904 a tennis pavilion and grandstand stood. Other estate subdivisions followed in 1900 and 1911. Today, huge Bay figs (Ficus macrophylla) frame the oval and give some sense of a former landscape estate.

Raywell:
Raywell is situated on what was originally part of the Birch Grove (later Birchgrove) Estate 1796 grant to Thomas Whitfield, a private in the NSW Corps.

Birchgrove Estate passed through several hands before being acquired by John Birch, Paymaster of the 73rd Regiment, in 1810. He built Birch Grove House, from which the suburb was to derive its name. This house was demolished in 1967. (Pollen, 1996, 29).

It was lot 25 in Section 7 of the subdivision by Reuss Jnr in 1878 and sold to A M McLean, T M McGregor and Lancelot Edward Threckeld (missionary) in 1879.

It was built by Duncan Smith and sold in 1885 to produce merchant and commission agent, R.William Ainsworth.

It became known as 'Raywell' during the occupancy of apinster, Miss Rachel Cole Wells who lived there from 1888 to 1928. (Lawrence & Warne, 1995, 65).

In 1979 discussions were held proposing the demolition of Raywell. An Interim Heritage Order was placed over the property on 7 September 1979.

In 1980 a new owner purchased the property and supported the making of a Permanent Conservation Order which was gazetted on 1 May 1981. The item was transferred to the State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Bungalows-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian bungalow-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act See File For Schedule
Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1): (1) The maintenance of the item where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material.
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, and tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
Aug 11 1989
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0009302 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0009301 May 81 642456
Local Environmental Plan  15 Jun 84   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Raywell View detail
WrittenBranch Manager, Heritage Branch1980Branch Manager's Report 4/9/1980
WrittenBranch Manager, Heritage Branch1980Branch Manager's Report no. 193/80
WrittenBranch Manager, Heritage Branch1979Branch Managers Report No. 149/79
WrittenLawrence, Joan & Warne, Catherine1995A Pictorial History of Balmain to Glebe
WrittenPollen, Francis (ed.)1996Birchgrove, in 'The Book of Sydney Suburbs'
WrittenRead, Stuart (editor/compiler)2011National Archaeology Week - Birchgrove wander – post-industrial parks & private gardens Notes compiled by Stuart Read, for the Australian Garden History Society – Sydney & Northern NSW Branch, 21 May 2011

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045294
File number: 09/4875; S90/06018 & HC 32287


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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