Hereford House | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

About us

Hereford House

Item details

Name of item: Hereford House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.8792521624 Long: 151.1834427640
Primary address: 53 Hereford Street, Glebe, NSW 2037
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT2 DP1018012
   SP68134
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
53 Hereford StreetGlebeSydneyPetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 
NSW College of NursingCommunity Group 

Statement of significance:

Hereford House has historical significance for its assocation with William Bull, its first owner, a wheelwright and founder of the Glebe Rowing Club. The building also has an association with Stephen Patrick Mccormack and his family, the owners of the property from the 1950's until 1981. McCormack was a Mayor of Glebe. The building has historical significance because it demonstrates the process of residential development in Glebe in the mid-19th century.

Hereford House has aesthetic significance as a representative example of a Victorian Filigree style house. The building has significance as part of the Victorian period streetscape of Hereford Street.

The building has social significance because it is recognised by the community as a Victorian period house which is a major element of the Glebe streetscape.

(Perumal Murphy Wu Pty Ltd March 2000)
Date significance updated: 13 Aug 02
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1870-1879
Physical description: Setting and context:
Hereford House is representative of grand houses constructed for the wealthy in Glebe in the late 19th century. It makes a strong contribution to a predominantly Victorian era streetscape. The house is setback from Hereford Street with a front garden and iron palisade fence to the street with centrally located gate which lines up with a path leading to the verandah and front door (LEP, 2012).

House:
A good example of a Victorian Filigree Style villa, with load bearing masonry walls and mostly timber framed floors and roof (LEP, 2012).

The building is single fronted. It has a simple hipped slate roof with terracotta ridge and hip capping, and boxed eaves. There is pair symmetrically arranged chimneys behind the main ridge, which are moulded and rendered. The building has a skillion and gabled corrugated iron roof above a single storey rear section (Perumal Murphy Wu, March 2000).

The walls are generally ashlar rendered. There is a double storey verandah on the symmetrical street facade. It has a hipped corrugated iron roof. The verandah roof and first floor are supported on cast iron posts. The first floor verandah has a cast iron balustrade and there is a cast iron valance on both levels (ibid, 2000).

The windows are generally double-hung, with projecting sandstone sills and single pane sashes. There are two pairs of French windows on the first floor level of the street facade (ibid, 2000).

Interior
The building has a central hallway on both levels which provides access to a pair of rooms on each side. The hallway has a central archway and a timber stair with turned balusters (ibid, 2000).

The original kitchen would originally have been located in rooms at the rear. There is a large proportion of surviving original fabric in the main part of the house, including plaster ceilings, roses and cornices, marble fireplaces and timber skirtings, picture rails, doors and architraves (ibid, 2000).
Modifications and dates: 2000 - Subject to refurbishment as part of the redevelopment of the former College of Nursing Site at 53-55 Hereford Street.
Current use: residence
Former use: Aboriginal land, Church Glebe land, part of suburban estate lands/garden, suburban residence, possible use of its stables as grower's agent depot (unsubstantiated claim)

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (Heiss, Sydney City Council).

Glebe is now much altered from the environment which was home to Aboriginal people of the Guringai tribe for thousands of years and which Europeans first saw soon after the settlement was established at Sydney Cove in 1788. Blackwattle Creek and Blackwattle Bay were discovered and named in 1789 (Perumal Murphy Wu, March 2000).

Almost half of the Aboriginal population was killed by disease within the first few years of white occupation and survivors, with their traditional life shattered and increasing pressure put on their resources, retreated away from the principal settlement. It is likely that the relatively untouched area of Glebe provided some shelter but there are no known Aboriginal sites on or near the study area (ibid, 2000).

The area is based on a geology of sandstone with Wianamatta shale caps. The shallow sandy soil supported, on the ridge tops, robust forests of tall eucalypts and angophoras. Below was a shrubby under-storey that included acacias and banksias. The study area would have supported an environment of this type. Further down the ridges were black wattles, tea-trees and swamp oaks and these gave way at the marshy and muddy intertidal zone to mangroves. Blackwattle Bay extended in a rivulet to Parramatta Road, Wentworth Park occupies the reclaimed headwaters of this bay (ibid, 2000).

Governor Phillip made the observation that this land was, "in general so rocky that it is surprising that such large trees should find sufficient nourishment but the soil between the rocks is good and the summits of the rocks ... with few exceptions are covered with trees most of which are so large that the removing them off the ground after they are cut down is the greatest part of the labour" (ibid, 2000).

The land was not suited to farming because of its topography and soils and the first European associated with it, the Reverend Richard Johnson, famously described his land as "four hundred acres not worth four pence". Despite its limited use for agriculatural purposes the timber was a valuable raw material and by the 1820s at least a substantial portion of the land in the vicinity of the study area had been cleared and fenced ready for sale (ibid, 2000).

In 1790 Governor Phillip reserved approximately 400 acres of land to the south and west of Blackwattle Creek as a Glebe devoted to supporting the Anglican Church. The Reverend Richard Johnson set about clearing it. He had few convicts to do so and considered the land poorly suited to agriculatural purposes. In 1974 he exchanged his rights to this land for a separate grant. The Glebe land appears to have remained relatively untouched from this time until the 1820s (ibid, 2000).

Clergy & School Lands Corporation: the Glebe Land:
In 1826 a Corporation was formed to administer all the lands reserved for clerical and educational use and income. This was the Clergy and School Lands Corporation. The Glebe land came under their authorisation as part of a Crown Grant made to the Corporation. The latter, being in a parlous financial situation, made the decision to sell this estate to generate income (ibid, 2000).

The land was sold as 2 subdivisons at 2 separate auctions the second being on 7 May 1828 (Perumal Murphy Wu, 2000).
The Church sold 27 allotments in 1828 - north on the point and south around Broadway. The Church kept the middle section where the Glebe Estate is now. Up until the 1970s the Glebe Estate was in the possession of the Church (ibid, 2000).

On the point the sea breezes attracted the wealthy who built villas. The Broadway end attracted slaughterhouses and boiling down works that used the creek draining to Blackwattle Swamp. Smaller working-class houses were built around these industries. Abbattoirs were built there from the 1860s (ibid, 2000).

At that time Mr A K Mackenzie purchased thirty-seven acres at fifteen pounds and six shillings per acre being portion 15 of the second subdivision. The study area (of this Hereford House) is contained within it. The full extent of his holding is shown on an updated plan of the Glebe lands. During the following year he subdivided his purchase and submitted it for public action in July 1829. It was reported in the Australian of 22 July 1829 (ibid, 2000).

Frederick Unwin, John Wood, John Wood Jr. and the Glenwood Estate:
Frederick Unwin purchased most of this land, including the study area, for a little over 564 pounds. In January 1831, an indenture was made between Unwin and John Wood for the sale of a portion of the property for 168 pounds. It included the study area (of this Hereford House). In 1834 Woods' son, John William, paid his father three hundred pounds and an annuity for life of 208 pounds for the property (ibid, 2000).

Because of a complicated arrangement of deposit and repayments of principal and interest between the original purchaser and the Clergy and School Lands Corporation which had been passed on to each new owner, Woods did not come into full title of the property until he paid the agent of the corporation (which had been dissolved in 1833) a balance of 175 pounds on his land. He was then granted title to a little over four acres. The title was issued on 31 March 1856 (ibid, 2000).

Woods retained ownership of this property until the 1870s. Council rate valuations of the 1860s record that he had a house, grounds, cottage and orchard very close to the study area closer to Glebe Point Road. It is likely that the study area was part of a garden or the orchard being this close to the main residence. Wood made a will in 1874 and appointed Trustees for his estate. He died in February 1875 (ibid, 2000).

The trustees subdivided the property and it was actioned as the Glenwood Estate. On 27 November 1875 William Bull paid 320 pounds for lots 4 and 5 of the Glenwood Estate. This encompassed both the present-day 53 and 55 Hereford Street (ibid, 2000).

Glebe Municipality:
When Glebe was made a municipality in 1859 there were pro and anti-municipal clashes in the streets. From 1850 Glebe was dominated by wealthier interests. Reclaiming the swamp, Wentworth Park opened in 1882 as a cricket ground and lawn bowls club. Rugby Union was played there in the late 19th century. The dog racing started in 1932. In the early 20th century modest villas were broken up into boarding houses as they were elsewhere in the inner city areas. The wealthier moved into the suburbs which were opening up through the railways (Dr Lisa Murray, in Central Sydney, 5/8/2009).

William Bull JP and Hereford House:
William Bull was born in 1819 in Liverpool, the son of a First Fleeter of 1788. In Glebe, Bull is said to have worked as a local wheelwright. By the time he built and occupied Hereford House he was listed in city directories as a Justice of the Peace or solictor (ibid, 2000).

Bull appears to have used part of his land (the present No. 53) almost immediately to build a new, two-storey residence he called "Hereford House". He is listed in occupation by the mid-1870s in city directories and council rate assessments which simply describe his property as "house". By 1889 it was home to six people (ibid, 2000).

NB: An earlier, and first 'Hereford House' was built in 1829 as Glebe's first 'Gentleman's residence', designed by Edward Hallen for publican, George Williams. It sat on ten acres of land. Architect John Verge worked on later alterations. Its later owners were chemist Ambrose Foss, merchant William Hirst, solicitor George Rogers, ironmonger Thomas Woolley, merchant Joshua Young and judge William Wilkinson. That family reduced its holding to 1.5 acres and after them it became a teachers' training college. It was demolished and its site became a municipal rest park (now Foley Park, cnr. Bridge Rd., Glebe Pt. Rd., in the 1930s (Collingwood, Crawshaw and Hannan, 2019).

The earliest survey plan of the (this, surviving Hereford House) property dates from 1888. It shows Hereford House fenced off from the vacant block of 55 Hereford Street. It is fenced from its other neighbour, a very large residence called "Lask" (now demolished). Between the two, from Hereford Street, was a passage running the full depth of Hereford House. The house is shown to a have a full width verandah both front and back with a small brick extension at one end of the back verandah. Behind the house, some distance from it on the boundary fence with 55 Hereford Street, was a large brick-built stables. This had a brick WC at one end and galvanised iron shed at the other. No evidence of landscape is recorded on this plan (ibid, 2000).

Bull was the founder of the Glebe Rowing Club (LEP, 2012).

William Bull died in the new early years of the new century and the executors of this estate sold Hereford House to Alice Goldsmith and her husband William in 1909. William was a butcher. The improved capital value of their property was rated in 1919 as 1700 pounds (ibid, 2000).

The Goldsmiths sold Hereford House to Alexander Levi in 1924. Mr Levi leased the house to Ernest Arnold. A survey plan of the property in 1926 shows that the out-buildings on the boundary with 'Kerribree' had been extended by this date to the back fence. The galvanised iron shed had been more than doubled size and abutting it and extending to the lane was another brick building. The water closets had been transferred to a block that occupied almost all of the back fence leaving a small gate between them and the brick shed on the boundary. Some extensions and changes are also shown to have been made to the back of Hereford House (ibid, 2000).

Levi sold Hereford House in 1928 to Louise and Phillip Leonard. Sands directory listings show that Mr Arnold continued to lease the property at least until the early 1930s. In 1951 the Leonards sold Hereford House to the McCormacks (ibid, 2000).

Up until the 1950s Sydney was the location for working class employment - it was a port and industrial city. By the 1960s central Sydney was becoming a corporate city with service-based industries - capital intensive not labour intensive. A shift in demographics occurred, with younger professionals and technical and administrative people servicing the corporate city wanting to live close by. Housing was coming under threat and the heritage conservation movement was starting. The Fish Markets moved in in the 1970s. A influx of students came to Glebe in the 1960s and 1970s (ibid, 2009).

It has been claimed that McCormack, a Mayor of Glebe occupied this house since the 1920s and used it as a transport depot in his capacity as a growers agent. The stables at the rear are claimed to have accommodated draught horses which were used to transport produce from the railway at Darling Harbour to the city markets. While the property may have been used in this way, there is no primary evidence to show an association between it and the McCormacks before the 1950s. Similarly the claim that there were two tennis courts at the rear of the property on which the champion Lew Hoad learnt to play may well be true but cannot find support in any primary evidence (ibid, 2000).

Alderman Stephen Patrick McCormack was a master carrier, and a City Councillor from 1932-39; and 1941-43, the year he died (https://www.sydneyaldermen.com.au/). McCormack was a Mayor of Glebe. He and his family owned the property from 1951 until 1981 (LEP, 2012).

The property was still in the ownership of Ald. Stephen Patrick McCormack and Sons Pty Ltd when it was sold to the NSW College of Nursing in 1981. The College, who has also acquired the adjoining property at 55 Hereford Street in 1975, carried out extensive restoration and repair work to the building (ibid, 2000).

Hereford House was made subject of a permanent conservation order under the NSW Heritage Act in 1986 and entered on the NSW State Heritage Register in 1999.

In 1999 approval was granted ( DA/99/0782) for redevelopment of the College of Nursing site comprising:
- Re-subdivision of land at 53 and 55 Hereford Street into proposed Lots 1,2 and 3;
- Demolition of two demountable buildings at the rear site and the Kaitie Zepps Library Building;
- Construction on proposed Lot 1, behind Kerribree and Hereford House, 19 townhouses and home units with car parking and strata subdivision;
- Alterations of Kerribree on proposed Lot 3 and subdivision of the house into two attached dwellings (LEP, 2012).

In 2000 approval was given for subdivision of the property and new townhouses to the rear.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - urban villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for merchants and dealers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing working animals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing professional people-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Victorian era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Housing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Alienating Crown Lands for religious purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Administering and alienating Crown lands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Laneway-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Indicators of early town planning and the disposition of people within the emerging settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping coastal settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Urban residential estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Suburban Consolidation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Suburban Expansion-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Local government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - town and country planning-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Inter War-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a new house-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Leisure-Includes tourism, resorts.
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Glebe or church lands to support priest-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Anglican Community-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Belonging to an historical society or heritage organisation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing local clubs and meeting places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Joining together to study and appreciate local history-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Wood, gentleman-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with A.K. Mackenzie, landholder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Frederick Unwin, landholder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John William Wood, landholder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Bull JP, solicitor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Goldsmith, butcher and wife, Alice-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Alexander Levi, landholder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Earnest Arnold, Glebe tenant-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Phillip and Louise Leonard, landowners-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Ald. Stephen Patrick McCormack, Master Carrier and City Councillor 1932-9 1941-3-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site is one small part of the earliest European association with Glebe and its subsequent history of subdivision and sale into increasingly small allotments is typical of the history of Glebe.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Hereford House has particular associations with William Bull and Stephen McCormack, both prominent local figures.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Good example of their late Victorian-period architectural styles (Victorian Filigree and Italianate Filigree)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
This site comprise some of the earlier residential developments in this area
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The site is unlikely to contain a substantial and largely undisturbed archaeological resource. Some evidence may be found of the changes made to the landscape, wells or tanks and distrubed fragments of buildings already known to exist. The evidence which may be exposed by future work is likely to add to existing information in quite minor ways. It is unlikely to have potential for substantive interpretive or investigative values.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The residential use, style of house and the economic bracket they represent is characteristic for this part of Glebe during the later nineteenth century.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The building, and front fence and gate should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls (LEP, 2012).

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act General maintenance

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any item on the site meaning the continuous protective care of existing materials.
Jul 11 1986
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0046002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0046011 Jul 86 1103336
National Trust of Australia register Hereford House7892   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Leichhardt Municipality Heritage Study1990B30GMcDonald McPhee P/L  No
National Trust Register (NSW)1986 National Trust Register (NSW)MM Hargreaves No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCity of Sydney Council 'Stephen Patrick McCormack' View detail
WrittenCollingwood, Lyn, Crawshaw, Peter and Hannan, Robert2019Villas of Glebe
WrittenKerr, Joan1983Edmund T. Blacket
WrittenMM Hargreaves1986National Trust of Australia, Suburban Register, Listing Card
WrittenMurray, Dr Lisa2009Glebe (suburb: historical profile)
WrittenPerumal Murphy Wu2000Hereford House

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045299
File number: S90/05690 & HC 32614


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.