National Mutual Building (former) | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

About us

National Mutual Building (former)

Item details

Name of item: National Mutual Building (former)
Other name/s: Society General Building, Societe Generale House, Equitable Building, 350 George
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Insurance company/building
Location: Lat: -33.8669493422 Long: 151.2074213380
Primary address: 348 - 352 George Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
   SP86960
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
348 - 352 George StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address
350 George StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Kador Group HoldingsPrivate 

Statement of significance:

The building (1894) is a fine example of the Federation Romanesque style of architecture and as one of the earliest buildings in Australia to show the influence of this American Romanesque style. The building is associated with American architect, Edward Raht, acknowledged at the time for having introduced the Federation Romanesque style to Australia. Raht followed the originator of this style, American architect Henry Hobson Richardson. It was one of the first buildings to be constructed with external walls entirely of trachyte, which was more commonly used as a decorative stone in combination with other materials. It is a source of information about overseas construction techniques at the turn of the century, including terracotta floors and marble slab floors supported directly on steelwork. Constructed for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States of America, the building is also an expression of the expansion of major American companies into the Australian insurance market in the late Victorian period. The building is significant as the site of the business office from which the pioneer Australian feminist and advocate for female suffrage, Maybanke Wolstenholme, ran both her journal, The Woman's Voice, and the Women's Federation League, an organisation she established in April 1898. The League was the first organisation specifically formed to get women to take an active political role in the wider federation campaign in NSW. The building contains a remarkable steel-framed full-height atrium and fine examples of design and craftsmanship in marble, plaster, steel, bronze and glass. The building makes a major contribution to the streetscape of George Street and lower Martin Place.
Date significance updated: 26 Jul 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Edward Raht (building); Prof. Tilguer, Vienna (bronze statue on front)
Builder/Maker: Hudson and Loveridge (building); Vienna's Imperial Art Foundry (bronze statue on front)
Construction years: 1891-1894
Physical description: PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
The building is a six-storey structure (with basement) which exhibits many of the distinctive features of the Federation Romanesque style. These include rock-faced masonry, a large and strongly modelled semicircular opening at the ground and first floor level, an arcade above and squat masonry columns with Romanesque capitals at the first and top floor levels.

The George Street and Angel Place facades feature arcades heavily modelled in Bowral trachyte and marble, mostly in the form of heavily rusticated rock-faced blocks, erected by the stone masonry firm of Hudson and Loveridge.

The less exposed Ash Street facade is in brick relived by a trachyte base, string-course, window mullions and spandrels.

The main George Street entrance is dominated by a huge arch spanning some 13 metres each individual voussoir weighs three tons. The unusual recessed facade above has window balconies on the second, third and fourth floors behind classical columns. Building materials are all of high quality.

The internal structure system is an early example of steel-framed structure for internal load with external load-bearing walls. It consists of masonry walls, cast iron and mild steel columns, beams and joists. The board room is remarkable.

The building has a full height atrium around which are the main stair and lobbies, constructed from slabs of marble supported directly off steel frames and serving as both floors and ceilings. The atrium has a decorative ceiling of coloured glass, and the atrium is lined with marble facings and decorative bronze work.

The early lift cars are used in 2 modern enclosures. It relates to the nearby ANZ Bank also designed by Raht in the same materials and with a similarly heavily modelled facade, but in neo-classical style.

Building in the style of the early Romanesque designed around a large central light well containing a grand staircase with a balustrade of Belgian marble. Two elaborate open cage lifts were located within the light well area, which was originally roofed by a magnificent stained glass ceiling (Matthews, 1986, 1).

Construction of the monumentally proportioned external walls was in trachyte from Bowral (Matthews, 1986, 1). The building was exceptional for its use of trachyte for the entire exterior and not merely for lower stories, arches and columns. It was one of the first buildings to be constructed with external walls entirely of trachyte, which was more commonly used as a decorative stone in combination with other materials.

Brickwork was used on the eastern and northern facades, all external walls being load bearing. Foundations were predominantly of sandstone. All facades were backed internally with plastered brickwork. Above the 12.2m arch to George Street were massive columns of polished granite imported from Peterhead, Scotland. The bronze statue above the main arch was designed by Prof. Tilguer of Vienna and made at Vienna's Imperial Art Foundry (Matthews, 1986, 1).

The basement and lower ground floor were designed for commercial occupation and the ground floor was used for two banking chambers. A handsome vestibule, its walls faced with Italian marble, provided access to the uppper floors, which housed the well-heated and ventilated offices of the Society. On the fifth floor there was a banqueting hall 28m long by 11m wide and 7m high. From this level a circular cast iron staircase led to the sixth floor where the caretaker's residence were located (Matthews, 1986, 1).

Internally the structure includes steel columns and floor beams prefabricated by the Phoenix Steel Company in the USA and shipped, ready for assembly, to Australia. The entire building was designed to be fire-resistant throughout by inclusion of terracotta cladding on all steel columns and beams. The floor construction consisted of flat arches in terracotta located between steel beams with terracotta facing to the undersides of the beams. Floors in office areas were generally surfaced in tallowood parquetry laid in molten bitumen (ibid, 1986, 2).

All three entry points to George Street (vestibule entry and two banking chambers' entries) were fitted with hydraulically-operated bronze security doors that were lowered to the basement during trading hours. These were manually operated by a small wheel set in the floor just inside the threshold of the entry (ibid, 1986, 2).
Modifications and dates: During World War 2, the ceiling of the light well was dismantled, boxed and stored in the basement. At this time, the basement was also converted for use as an air raid shelter. After the war, the ceiling was replaced (Matthews, 1986, 1).

1949 alterations to the fitout. This was the beginning of extensive alterations that continued until about 1960. Among major changes made were removal of the open caged lifts, the bronzed doors to the banking chambers, stained glass ceiling and internal arches to the first floor. The banqueting room on the fifth floor was subdivided into several rooms, a mezzanine floor built at the rear of the ground floor level and aluminium doors and sidelights installed in the vestible and at the building's front (ibid, 1986, 2).

1986 restoration completed, fitting it for modern office use, while restoring and reconstructing significant historic elements damaged or lost in the past 50 years. Modifications made between 1949 and 1960 were reversed, restoring and reconstructing the bronzed front doors to the old banking chambers, the stained glass ceiling and internal arhces to the first floor, the ban queting room on the fifth floor was unpicked back into one large room, a mezzanine floor at the rear of the ground floor was removed, aluminium doors and sidelights installed in the vestibule and at the front of the building were removed. Two new lift cores were built to the north and south of the central atrium to house both lifts and the fire stairs (reproduction of the original lifts was not practical or feasible). The central vestibule was restored, including reconstructing its leadlight glass ceiling and the massive archways to the light well at first floor level. Remnants of the stained glass ceiling and fixing rods (removed in the 1950s) were found in the vicinity of the original location and provided the basis for determining the reconstructed ceiling's colour. The banqueting hall on the fifth floor (as it was referred to in any article on the building of 1895) was returned to its original splendid decor (Matthews, 1986, 1,2).
Current use: Commerical and retail, offices
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, commercial, Insurance, banking

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

Subject site:
The subject land, on the east side of George Street opposite the original Barracks Square had been built upon from the early days of the colony. In 1880 number 348 was occupied by Fraser's Auction Rooms, number 350 by a jeweller and number 352 by Paling's famous Music Warehouse. The backs of the buildings were accessible from Mort's Passage (later known as Angel Place) to the south and through an arched right of way to the north.

In 1890 a major American insurance company, The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States of America, purchased the block containing numbers 348, 350 and 352 and existing buildings were demolished. The Equitable Life Assurance Society sent out from America their distinguished New York architect, Edward Raht (born in Austria). Raht was noted for his commissions to design prestige buildings for insurance companies and banks. Raht designed the office building around an innovative steel frame, faced with heavy, load-bearing trachyte in the Federation Romanesque style.

Raht's brief was to design two buildings for the Society, one in Sydney and one in Melbourne. He arrived in Sydney in 1891 and construction is believed to have commenced in December 1891. Messrs Loveridge and Hudson of Sydney were the builders. At an estimated cost of UK pounds 240,000, it was probably one of the most expensive and ambitious of the day. When completed, it was commonly held that the building surpassed anything of its kind that had ever been attempted in the Australian colonies (Matthews, 1986, 1).

A report published in the Building and Engineering Journal of 6/8/1892 described the building as being 'designed in the style of the early Romanesque, admirably adapted to modern requirements and construction combining art, utility, solidity and harmony in a unique design'. Raht designed it around a large central light well containing a grand staircase with a balustrade of Belgian marble. Two elaborate open cage lifts were located within the light well area, which was originally roofed by a magnificent stained glass ceiling (Matthews, 1986, 1).

The materials originally used have been well documented. Construction of the monumentally proportioned external walls was in trachyte from Bowral (Matthews, 1986, 1). It came from the quarries on Mount Gambier owned by the contractors Loveridge and Hudson. The building was exceptional for its use of trachyte for the entire exterior and not merely for lower stories, arches and columns. It was one of the first buildings to be constructed with external walls entirely of trachyte, which was more commonly used as a decorative stone in combination with other materials.

Brickwork was used on the eastern and northern facades, all external walls being load bearing. Foundations were predominantly of sandstone. All facades were backed internally with plastered brickwork. Above the 12.2m arch to George Street were massive columns of polished granite imported from Peterhead, Scotland. The bronze statue above the main arch was designed by Prof. Tilguer of Vienna and made at Vienna's Imperial Art Foundry (Matthews, 1986, 1).

The basement and lower ground floor were designed for commercial occupation and the ground floor was used for two banking chambers. A handsome vestibule, its walls faced with Italian marble, provided access to the uppper floors, which housed the well-heated and ventilated offices of the Society. On the fifth floor there was a banqueting hall 28m long by 11m wide and 7m high. From this level a circular cast iron staircase led to the sixth floor where the caretaker's residence were located (Matthews, 1986, 1).

Internally the structure includes steel columns and floor beams prefabricated by the Phoenix Steel Company in the USA and shipped, ready for assembly, to Australia. The entire building was designed to be fire-resistant throughout by inclusion of terracotta cladding on all steel columns and beams. The floor construction consisted of flat arches in terracotta located between steel beams with terracotta facing to the undersides of the beams. Floors in office areas were generally surfaced in tallowood parquetry laid in molten bitumen (ibid, 1986, 2).

All three entry points to George Street (vestibule entry and two banking chambers' entries) were fitted with hydraulically-operated bronze security doors that were lowered to the basement during trading hours. These were manually operated by a small wheel set in the floor just inside the threshold of the entry (ibid, 1986, 2).

Erected in 1894, the building was an early example in Australia of the influence of the American Romanesque style developed by Raht's countryman, Henry Hobson Richardson, from the 1870s onward. After studying in Paris, Richardson had evolved his own simplified distillation of the Romanesque style and attracted numerous American disciples. The building is also a tangible expression of the expansion of major American companies into the Australian insurance market in the late Victorian period. Raht also designed offices for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States of America in Melbourne in 1892, using the same steel frame and thick stone walls (in this case granite).

Raht remained in Australia and designed the Bank of Australasia building at 354-360 George Street, Sydney in 1904.

By 1898, the pioneer Australian feminist and prominent member of the Womanhood Suffrage League of NSW, Maybanke Anderson (Wolstenholme), was occupying Room 16 on the third floor of the building as the office for her journal, 'The Woman's Voice'. In April of that year, Anderson also established the Women's Federal League as a separate, though related, organisation to the Australasian Federation League. Maybanke herself became the Women's League's Honorary Secretary. Though the Bathurst People's Convention of 1896 had included a women's organising committee, the League formed by Anderson was the first organisation specifically established to get women to take an active political role in the wider federation campaign in NSW. However, as women did not have the vote in NSW, itspurpose was to urge women to encourage their menfolk to support the federation cause and vote for federation in the referendum scheduled for 3 June 1898.

To this end, Anderson printed a circular letter asking women to join the League, to form their own branches of the organisation in each centre of their district and to form small groups of canvassers in each electorate. She intended that the canvassers would visit outlying areas as part of a campaign to urge all men to secure their voter's right and record a vote on the day of the referendum. By early May, Maybanke Anderson had sent out from her office in the then Equitable Building copies of the circular letter to suburban mayoresses, about one hundred wives of country mayors and many other well-known women.

For all her efforts, it is not clear to what extent women supported the Women's Federal League nor to what extent it was effective. There is no indication that any branches of the League were formed in response to her circular, though this may in part have been because of the very short time between the establishment of the organisation and the holding of the referendum. Nevertheless, the League seems to have faded away in the aftermath of the referendum, which failed to secure the required number of votes in favour of federation. A year later, in the lead-up to the second federation referendum, two other women's leagues were formed, one in Sydney known as the Ladies' Federal League and one in the Riverina town of Hay. Neither of these appears to have had any connection with the League founded by Maybanke Anderson in 1898.

During World War 2, the ceiling of the light well was dismantled, boxed and stored in the basement. At this time, the basement was also converted for use as an air raid shelter. After the war, the ceiling was replaced (Matthews, 1986, 1).

In 1923 the Society sold the building to the National Mutual Life Association of Australia Ltd., in whose ownership it remained until 1977. At the time of sale it was recorded that the building was in excellent condition (ibid, 1986, 2).

The Equitable Building retained its character as an insurance office, passing first to the National Mutual and later to the Societe Generale.

Mr M.V.E. Woodforde, FRAIA, the Sydney architect was commissioned by the National Mutual in 1949, to design and document alterations to the fitout. This was the beginning of extensive alterations that continued until about 1960. Among major changes made were removal of the open caged lifts, the bronzed doors to the banking chambers, stained glass ceiling and internal arches to the first floor. The banqueting room on the fifth floor was subdivided into several rooms, a mezzanine floor built at the rear of the ground floor level and aluminium doors and sidelights installed in the vestible and at the building's front (ibid, 1986, 2).

In 1986 the building's restoration was completed, under the direction of architects Kann, Finch and Partners, fitting it for modern office use, while restoring and reconstructing significant historic elements damaged or lost in the past 50 years. Modifications made between 1949 and 1960 were reversed, restoring and reconstructing the bronzed front doors to the old banking chambers, the stained glass ceiling and internal arhces to the first floor, the ban queting room on the fifth floor was unpicked back into one large room, a mezzanine floor at the rear of the ground floor was removed, aluminium doors and sidelights installed in the vestibule and at the front of the building were removed. Two new lift cores were built to the north and south of the central atrium to house both lifts and the fire stairs (reproduction of the original lifts was not practical or feasible). The central vestibule was restored, including reconstructing its leadlight glass ceiling and the massive archways to the light well at first floor level. Remnants of the stained glass ceiling and fixing rods (removed in the 1950s) were found in the vicinity of the original location and provided the basis for determining the reconstructed ceiling's colour. The banqueting hall on the fifth floor (as it was referred to in any article on the building of 1895) was returned to its original splendid decor (Matthews, 1986, 1,2).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. American late Victorian architectural influence-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Developing Commercial Enterprise-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Insurance industry-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Office use-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Banking-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Federation era office building-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from suburban to urban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the city-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Early Sydney Street-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Laneway-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Macquarie's town layout-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Commercial strip development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planning relationships between key structures and town plans-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing private towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working in offices-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Developing cultural institutions and ways of life-National Theme 8
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. work of stonemasons-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing making and showing stained and coloured glass-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Technological innovation and design solutions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Patronising artistic endeavours-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Romanesque Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating works of art-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living above a shop or office-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Loveridge and Hudson, stone merchants-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Raht, Austrian-American architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Professor Talguier, Austrian sculptor-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) Alterations to all office tenancies other than the ground floor, except where these would change the external appearance of the building. This exemption shall nott apply to the ground floor or atrium of the building.
(2) Change of use.
(3) Routine maintenance of the building, where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material without the introduction of new materials.
Aug 1 1986
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0023402 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0023403 Dec 82 1685549
Local Environmental PlanCSH Local Environmental Plan 4 07 Apr 00   
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenMatthews, David1986A future for the past

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5045334
File number: S90/04745, 10/20661


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.