Bedervale | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Bedervale

Item details

Name of item: Bedervale
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Farm
Location: Lat: -35.4692518282 Long: 149.8052358820
Primary address: Monkitee Street, Braidwood, NSW 2622
Local govt. area: Palerang
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Batemans Bay
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT3 DP543076
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Monkitee StreetBraidwoodPalerang  Primary Address
OFF Main RoadBraidwoodPalerangCoghillSt VincentAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 
National Trust of Australia (NSW)Community Group 

Statement of significance:

Bedervale homestead, flanking wings and two storey barn, all set around a central courtyard constitutes one of the most outstanding groups of rural buildings dating from New South Wales' colonial phase of development. It was designed by John Verge in 1836 and finished about 1842 for Captain James Coghill, an early pastoralist and MLC. The house has been in the ownership of the Maddrell family and descendents for over 120 years. The house contains original furniture and furnishings making it a rare and important intact collection in their original setting. (Branch Managers Report 1979)

Bedervale is the grandest colonial homestead in this part of NSW with some of the smartest interiors of its time. Largely unaltered since Edwardian times it contains notable examples of period interior decoration and detail. With its substantial stable and graveyard and other outbuildings it is a considerable rural group. The cultural landscape including ornamental garden vestiges, orchard, entry drives, ground formations, mature shelterbelts and other vegetation and the cemetery, provides a setting and environmental heritage context for the highly significant building group. As such the landscape is a critical part of the site curtilage. Individual elements carry importance such as specimen plantings (eg. Araucaria bidwillii [Bunya Pine] being a very rare plant in this region and probably only one of three surviving trees in Tallaganda Shire). Many plantings are old dating well into last century. The orchard contains older varieties of fruit trees worth more detailed investigation. The extant ground formations have the capacity to demonstrate early layouts revealing how the site was approached and circulation patterns. The cemetery is representative of such for the larger early estates and is historically important. Association with prominent early colonial families as well as with John Verge (LEP 1991)
Date significance updated: 16 Oct 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Verge
Builder/Maker: Captain John Coghill MLC (house; structure of garden; Margaret and Roger Royds (modern garden)
Construction years: 1836-1842
Physical description: Farm:
Bedervale is a 450 hectare working cattle and sheep-grazing property 2km from and with scenic views of the town of Braidwood, Mount Jillamatong and the coastal range to the east (www.hha.net.au/bedervale).

Bedervale is a working, grazing property with scenic views of the town of Braidwood, Mount Jillamatong and the coastal range (https://www.hha.net.au/bedervale).

Garden:
The gardens were established in 1974. Mature tree plantings shelter the house and comprise a number of species including shelter belts of Monterey pines (Pinus radiata), golden Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa 'Aurea', Arizona cypress (C.glabra), Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica), Bunya Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) and other trees, shrubs including Burwood's viburnum (V. x burkwoodii), dwarf heavenly or sacred bamboo (Nandina domestica 'Pygmaea'), set in expansive lawns. An informal panorama view and lawns are complemented by a variety of flowers including daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus), honesty (Lunaria annua), forget-me-nots (Myosotis campestris) and flag iris (I.germanica) in a tranquil setting with a vista of trees, a lake and a folly (www.bedervale.com/#/tours: botanical names added by Stuart Read, 24/12/2019).

House:
Bedervale is a large single storey, Georgian Revival style country house, built of brick stuccoed and lined to simulate stone. Roman Doric columns support a pedimented entablature over an opening flanked by arched semi-circular recesses. The original timber shingled roof, which is still in place, was built in four continuous pitches. An extra roof of iron was added to improve drainage. The joinery is of polished cedar, the floors are timber and the timber verandah is columned. The verandah floor is flagged (National Trust of Australia (NTA) (NSW), 1971).

Locally cut timber was used to make the black ash columns, cedar interiors and hardwood floors. The bricks were made on the property, and the sandstone and marble were quarried near Marulan from Bundanoon and Drayton respectively (http://www.bedervale.com/#/history/).

The house and outbuildings contain a unique collection of family possessions, vested to the National Trust of Australia (NSW), which date from the 1840s to the 1900s (NTA, 2019, 19).

Outbuildings:
Two flanking wings and a two storey stable block form an enclosed courtyard (ibid, 1971).

Stables:
The stables comprise horse stalls, saddle room, grain room and coach house with loft above (ibid, 1971)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good.
Date condition updated:22 Dec 97
Modifications and dates: 1830s - wings built to allow occupation of the site during the construction of the residence proper.
1836 - John Verge designs Bedervale.
1842 - Construction completed.
1888 - original timber shingles covered with iron and a second higher roof added over the central valley for drainage and chimneys extended to balance.
1905 - bay windows added on left of the house. Water and gas connected to house.
1975 - furniture and furnishings purchased by National Trust of Australia (NSW) under a National Estate Grant to ensure their retention in their original setting.
1980s - restoration works
Current use: Residence, tours, Bed & Breakfast, self-contained accommodation
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm and country residence

History

Historical notes: Braidwood or Wigwigly:
Largely unchanged since colonial days the area was originally settled in the 1830s. Aboriginals called the district 'Wigwigly' meaning 'plenty of fur', alluding to the abundant supply of food and clothing from such animals as opossum, koala and kangaroo. Discovered in 1822 by three currency lads, settlement followed in 1833. Due to criminal activities of bushrangers and convicts, a courthouse and lock-up were constructed and the town was built around them. The gold rush of the 1850s brought excitement and population and the district became known for the production of fine wool, beef cattle and fat lambs. In later years mining has re-commenced and the town's colonial charm has attracted a wave of new residents (National Trust of Australia (NSW), https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/event/looking-at-architecture-braidwood-weekend/, accessed 6/1/2020).

Early Settlement 1822 - 1839
Exploration
Europeans first entered the upper Shoalhaven River basin in 1822 under instruction from the new Governor, Thomas Brisbane, to investigate the possibility of a track between the Limestone Plains and Bateman's Bay. The reports of good country would have stimulated land selection in the area.

Land grants
The system of land grants available in the 1820s were attractive to settlers. A free grant of 640 acres of land (one square mile) was given to a selector for every (Pounds)500 of money or stock held, with a limit of 2000 acres, shortly afterwards increased to 2560 (four square miles). Captain Duncan Mackellar, one of the earliest settlers in the area, was granted 2000 acres in 1822 with which he selected the property "Strathallan". However it appears he didn't move onto the land until about 1829.

County and parish settlement model
When Governor Darling succeeded Governor Brisbane in 1825 he brought from London a new set of Instructions providing for the colony to be settled according to the English pattern of counties (approx 40 miles by 40 miles). The county boundaries were to generally follow natural features such as streams and ranges and were to have a county town and be divided again into hundreds (11 square miles) and parishes (25 square miles). The parishes were to be, as they were in England, a support for the Church of England that would eventually have a church, burial ground and parsonage in each parish. When the number of people allowed, parish local government of the English kind could be adopted. The Church and Schools corporation was to have one seventh of the land in each county for support of the Church of England. However it soon became apparent that the sparse populations in outer-lying areas would not support such a system, unlike in the densely populated areas such as Sydney.

Early survey instructions to Hoddle
Survey of the County of St Vincent had commenced in 1824 in the most northerly area. By December 1827 Assistant Surveyor Robert Hoddle (who later surveyed Melbourne) reported that the Shoalhaven had been traced to its source. Earlier in October that year Surveyor General Oxley instructed Hoddle to mark out land grants for intending settlers in the County of St Vincent.

The Anglican Church received priority treatment being allocated one seventh of the whole county consisting of the best land on the east bank of the Shoalhaven River. The Church and School Estate comprised approx 42,000 acres on the east side of the Shoalhaven River with a straight north-south boundary as the estate's east edge. This boundary line had significant ramifications for the subsequent land settlement pattern with Strathallan, Braidwood Farm and Coghill's land all granted east of this line. Even though the Church and School Estate was resumed circa 1835 the legacy of its land allocation remains clearly visible in the landscape today. Other settlers authorised to take possession of land were:

Dr T.B. Wilson RN 2560 acres grant,
Mr D Mackellar 2000 acres grant,
Mr Coghill 2000 acres grant
Mr Coghill 4000 acres purchase
Mr Ryrie 2560 acres grant
Mr Francis Dixon 2000 acres grant
Mr Francis Dixon 2000 acres purchase
Mr George Bunn 2560 grant
Mr D Mackellar Junior 640 grant
Oxley's instructions stated "These are the only settlers who have any title to land in the vicinity of Mt Solus (Mt Gillamatong)".

According to the census of October 1828 there were approximately 90 Europeans living in the area however few property owners were resident on their grant. After 1831 free grants of land ceased but the remaining land suitable for pastoral development was soon sold.

Early Settlers
Captain Duncan Mackellar
Three property holders feature significantly in Braidwood's establishment. Captain Duncan Mackellar and family joined his nephew at Strathallan in about 1829 and to their combined land grants of 3250, added another 4000 by purchase. Mackellar had one of the larger and more centrally located properties in the 19th County (St Vincent) and played a key role in the area until he sold the property in 1836. The bulk of the land was sold to John Coghill who owned the property on which Bedervale now stands. A small portion of land adjoining the "Jellamatong" (spellings vary) village reserve was sold to Dr Thomas Braidwood Wilson whose land adjoined Strathallan to the south.

Thomas Braidwood Wilson
Wilson had selected 2560 acres earlier, but it was not until 1836 that he settled on "Braidwood Farm" with his wife and two children. Wilson had been a Surgeon Superintendent of ships taking convicts to NSW and Van Diemen's Land. He was first granted land in Van Diemen's Land in 1824, which he exchanged for land near Lake George in 1825. In addition he was given 2560 acres which he selected in the 'new country' on 2 tributaries of the Shoalhaven, Monkittee and Flood creeks. Surveyor Hoddle was instructed in 1827 to survey it before all other grants promised in the area.

In 1833 the western end of Wilson's grant was resumed and reserved for a future village and a similar area added to the eastern end in compensation. Wilson was a humane and progressive thinker and it would seem that his settling in the area was encouraged by the administration. Wilson visited 'Braidwood Farm' when he was in the colony but it was not until late 1836 that he settled there with his wife and family. He became a community leader and amongst other things contracted to build the first courthouse in 1837-38. In 1840 Wilson petitioned the government to build a road from Braidwood to Huskisson to enable faster and cheaper shipping of the wool clip to Sydney and, with Col John Mackenzie, supplied the materials and labour for the Braidwood to Nerriga section.

In 1841 Braidwood Farm had 141 residents, twice the number on Coghill's combined properties of Bedervale and Strathallan. Although the drought had broken in 1840, the subsequent depression sent Wilson bankrupt and he died in November 1843. His land was sold to John Coghill for (Pounds)2,000 who now owned all the land on the south, east and north of the town. Before his death, Wilson had purchased the block immediately to the north of Braidwood. He was buried on this block, high on the hill overlooking the town. A memorial and large pine tree clearly mark the site, from which there are superb views of the town.

John Coghill
John Coghill was an astute businessman and manager. He had also managed a property for John Oxley, Surveyor General, near Camden, from which he ran a merchandising depot. Coghill had acquired the Bedervale property circa 1827-28 and visited frequently. He occasionally sat as a magistrate on the bench with Duncan Mackellar and made submissions to the colonial secretary on matters that affected the future of the area. In the mid to late 1830s Coghill engaged John Verge, well known colonial architect, to draw up house plans, and the house was completed by about 1842. It was also in the mid to late 1830s that Coghill purchased Strathallan.

While on a trip overseas John Coghill's daughter Elizabeth married Robert Maddrell, who came from the Isle of Man and was studying medicine at Heidelberg University. They returned to Australia and inherited Bedervale on Coghill's death in 1853. The property included Braidwood Farm which Maddrell renamed Mona, the original name for his birthplace, the Isle of Man. Under Robert Maddrell's management the estate expanded to 33,000 acres, much of it farmed by tenant farmers. By 1860, Robert Maddrell had 84 tenants on the three large Maddrell properties that surrounded Braidwood. Portions of these farms were eventually sold to the tenants, but in 1882 Robert Maddrell still had 52,000 acres.

Most significantly however, the ownership of the land on the north, east and south of the town by one family resulted in the town boundary on these sides remaining virtually intact and the landscape remaining large open paddocks, although there has been some recent subdivision and modification to this cultural landscape.

Early development in the town
Several buildings were erected c1840/41, including the first Doncaster Inn (1841-1907). The economic depression of the early 1840s slowed development a few years but gradually a business centre developed along Mackellar Street adjacent to Monkittee Creek and on the north-facing slope of Wallace Street. Proximity to creek water was an incentive to spread along Mackellar Street as was, apparently, the disincentive of ascending the "Jew's Hill". Surveyor Larmer purchased land and built the Royal Hotel c1845 (the present Museum). In Mackellar Street the three-storeyed Albert Buildings, later converted to a steam-driven flourmill, were used as shops by Hendricks and Jacobs (still standing). On the corner of Mackellar and Wallace Streets was the Post Office and store (still standing). A District Council was established in 1843.

The first steam mill was erected in 1846 at the junction of Monkittee Creek and Mona Creek near the site of Dr Wilson's first house at Braidwood Farm (the footings are still evident).

The population grew from 1100 in the 1841 census to 1429 in the Braidwood Police District in 1851, 212 of who lived in the town. With the discovery of gold in Araluen in mid 1851, and throughout the region soon after, Braidwood's role as the primary town in the district strengthened. Braidwood's business centre eventually crept over the hill and to the south end of Wallace Street following the survey of the road to Nelligen, and the continuing business from the goldfields to the south.

Braidwood's "National School" was opened in 1849 in Wilson Street opposite the present site. The government granted part of the present site in 1851 and a permanent building was finished in 1852. A brewery was opened in 1851 along with numerous other businesses and small industries. The Joint Stock Bank was built 1855 in response to the gold boom, with others following. By 1857 there were three tanning factories in the town. The 1856 census shows 3045 people in Braidwood police district and in 1861 there were 959 people in the town and 8199 in the surrounding goldfields. The town's population climbed to 1197 by 1871.

A small brick Anglican Church and rectory was erected in Wilson Street in 1856. A larger church in Elrington St was dedicated in 1892 and the tower finally added 1899, all from granite quarried on Wilson's Hill and Mt Gillamatong. One third of the local population was Catholic and by 1865 St Bedes was completed. The Wesleyan Church in Duncan Street was built 1856 and the Presbyterian Church erected in 1861 on the corner of Duncan and Monkittee.

The Commercial Hotel, which is currently being restored by John Mitchell, was built 1859. In 1866 there were eleven other hotels in Braidwood besides the Doncaster, the Royal and the Commercial. The Court House hotel still stands as a two storey brick building in Wallace Street as does the Gold Diggers Home, which became Nomchong's hardware and now a bottle shop diagonally opposite St Bedes. Nomchong, who came from China to the goldfields, moved from Mongarlowe to Braidwood in 1879 and his family became well known locally. In the late 1860s, 1870s and 80s, many of the less substantial buildings were demolished and brick and granite structures took their place.

Bedervale:
Captain John Coghill built Bedervale (between 1836 and 1840) for his family as a country cottage. He was born at Wick in Scotland in 1785. He became Captain of the transport 'Martha' in 1814, but his best known ship was the 'Mangles' of which he was part owner. In 1826 Coghill sold the 'Mangles' to Captain Carr. Coghill retired to manage 'Kirkham', the property he was in partnership with John Oxley at Camden (Narellan, near Camden).

Captain Coghill possessed a grant at Berrima which he had been given in 1822. In 1826 he selected 'Bedervale' a 5,600 acre tract of land in the County of Argyle on which he was running 300 head of cattle by 1828 and in 1833 a mob of sheep. He paid 1,400 pounds (about 55 cents per acre). The house was designed by architect John Verge in 1836 at which time the building was commenced and was completed before 1842 (design cost 16 pounds).

Coghill became a member of the Legislative Council representing Argyle between 1843 and 1845. With his wife and two daughters he returned to England where they stayed several years. In 1845 Coghill resigned his seat in the Legislative Council to travel. The family spent four years abroad, much of this on the Continent, where Elizabeth, his second daughter, met Robert Maddrell and they were married in London in 1849. They first met at Heidelburg University, where Robert, who came from the Isle of Man, was studying medicine. They all returned to Australia in 1849, where during their absence, David Coghill (John Coghill's only son) had died at the early age of 31 in 1847.

Robert Arthur Coghill Maddrell sold Bedervale to the Royds family during Easter of 1973 (http://www.bedervale.com/#/history/ says 1972). The terms of sale included homestead and surrounding property / livestock. The terms excluded the contents of the house at that point, the Royds family agreed to puchase the contents within the following 2 years. This arrangment was not executed due to financial constraints. As a consequence, Robert Maddrell arranged for the contents to be bought by the National Trust of Australia (NSW), in order to maintain this invaluable collection. Due to his actions, the National Trust were bestowed custodianship, ensuring the collection would perpetually remain the property of the public and in its rightful location at Bedervale (Richard C Maddrell, by email 13 June 2009).

After two years Mr T.R. (Roger) Royds arranged for a National Estate grant to purchase the furniture collection, and nominated the National Trust of Australia (NSW) as its owners.

During the 1980s with the assistance from Heritage Assistance program funding, Bedervale homestead was restored.

Margaret and Roger Royds worked tirelessly to preserve Bedervale, which is now being carried on by their daughter Sonia (http://www.bedervale.com/#/history/). Bed-and-breakfast and tours are available by prior appointment and are operated by Sonia Horan and her family (www.bedervale.com).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. Scottish settlers-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Mushroom farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Truffle farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for wool-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use cattle-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Livestock structures-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Beef cattle breeding and raising-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Modifying landscapes to increase productivity-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing (regional towns)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. early settlement or worker's cottage-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. gentlemen's residences-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing politicians-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating workers in workers' housing-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Robert Maddrell of Bedervale, Braidwood grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Verge, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with T.R. (Roger) Royds, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Margaret Royds, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Captain John Coghill MLC, politician and colonial grazier-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Bedervale homestead, flanking wings and two storey barn, all set around a central courtyard constitutes one of the most outstanding groups of rural buildings dating from New South Wales' colonial phase of development. It was designed by John Verge in 1836 and finished about 1842 for Captain James Coghill an early pastoralist and MLC. The house has been in the ownership of the Maddrell family and descendents for over 120 years. The House contains a rare and intact collection of original furniture. (Branch Managers Report 1979& 1984)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Bedervale is a large Geoargian house with very finely detailed cedra joinery to the interiors. Bedervale homestead is set on a propoerty of 500 acres, located over a rise from Braidwood and has extensive views across the township, Mount Jillamatong and the coastal range. (Branch Managers Report 1979)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The furniture and furnishings inckuding paintings, china, cutlery etc are retained in their original setting making it a rare and original collection. (Branch Managers Report 1984)
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Bedervale is an outstanding group of rural buildings dating from New South Wales' colonial phase of development. (Branch Managers Report 1979)
Integrity/Intactness: The furniture and furnishings inckuding paintings, china, cutlery etc are retained in their original setting making it a intact and original collection. (Branch Managers Report 1984)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.
Maintenance & horticultural management.
Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(a) horticultural and agricultural management;
(b) eradication of noxious animals and noxious plants;
(c) pasture improvement, not requiring substantial clearing of existing vegetation;
(d) stock grazing, not requiring substantial of existing vegetation; and
(e) maintenance and repairs to existing farm fences.
Feb 22 1985
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0001702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0001722 Feb 85 440857
Local Environmental PlanBedervale Homestead, Outbuildings and Burial Groun 22 Nov 91 163 
National Trust of Australia register Bedervale1351   
Register of the National EstateBedervale115821 Mar 78   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written 1979Branch Managers Report - Bedervale
TourismBedervale Historic Homestead2006Bedervale Historic Homestead - B&B Homepage View detail
WrittenBedervale.com Bedervale (website) View detail
WrittenBetteridge, Margaret; National Trust of Australia (NSW)1979Bedervale Catalogues (contents of house; and library)
WrittenHeritage Branch1984Branch Managers Report - Bedervale
WrittenHistoric Houses Association Bedervale Homestead, Braidwood View detail
TourismNational Trust of Australia (NSW)2007Bedervale Accommodation View detail
WrittenNational Trust of Australia (NSW)1971National Trust Classification Card and supporting information
PhotographNSW Heritage Office1979(not stated)

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045345
File number: S90/05304, HAP90 308, HC 30176


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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