Golden Vale | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Golden Vale

Item details

Name of item: Golden Vale
Other name/s: Golden Valley
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.5423654896 Long: 150.3105340690
Primary address: Golden Vale Road, Sutton Forest, NSW 2577
Parish: Bong Bong
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP1118652
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Golden Vale RoadSutton ForestWingecarribeeBong BongCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
National Trust of Australia (NSW)Community Group 

Statement of significance:

The Golden Valley property is significant through its associations with the early settlement of the area and its connection with Benjamin Carter who discovered the Joadja Kerosene Shale deposits. The sandstone homestead, meathouse, barn/stables and woolshed are aesthetically significant because they are well sited within a valley at the base of Ginginbullen Mountain. They are a rare example within the region of such a combination of stone and timber buildings present in a pleasant setting. The group is also significant as a landmark within the important landscape setting of Mt Gingenbullen (LEP, 1990).

A two-storey sandstone house with a corrugated iron roof. The lower storey has a verandah across the front which returns halfway along either side of the house. The returns, reveals and front facades are careful masonry. The wall infill particularly at the rear is the work of labourers or apprentices. It is supported by timber columns. At the rear, an enclosed courtyard is formed by the kitchen wings. The cedar joinery throughout the house is of good quality. The house apparently expresses an unfulfilled design. The carefully executed front contrasts with the more utilitarian rear, but although the walled garden is modern there is no indication that the house has ever been accessible from the front (LEP, 1989).

A distinguished and well built house. The original owner Benjamin Carter discovered Kerosene Shale in the Joadja Valley in 1852. By 1873 he was mining this valuable shale and later sold out to the Australian Kerosene Oil and Minerals Company. An elegant example of a late Georgian farmhouse. Golden Valley is a large property settled in 1856. (AHC, 1978).
Date significance updated: 10 Jan 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1868-1869
Physical description: Farm:
The property nestles between Oldbury and Newbury farms at the foot of Mt Gingenbullen (to its south-south-west) near the Medway Rivulet. It is cleared and grazed Southern Tableland country, surrounded by rural properties. The farm is treed and dammed (Keighley, 1984).

Garden & Grounds:
The attractive gardens surrounding the homestead have been created in the English style by Karin Keaghley. The plants are primarily deciduous trees and shrubs and feature in springtime with drifts of bulbs. Another point of interest is the collection of parrots displayed in aviaries. High stone walls protect part of the garden from the weather. Outside these walls a long, tree lined driveway leads up to the front gates on the Golden Vale Road (National Trust, c.2006).

The driveway is lined with Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara) interplanted with golden ash (Fraxinus excelsior 'Aurea') trees, is long and straight, curving west around the house, where a greater density of hedges and fences form yards and paddocks at the farm's core.

The service yard behind (west of) the house is gravelled and edged by outbuildings. A single gated entry to the rear of the house leads between outbuildings to it. Other gates are further north on the house's north-western side; around and further along the house garden's northern boundary (Stuart Read, pers.comm., visit 12/8/12).

Older picket fences on the north and west of the garden have been replaced by high, stone-capped concrete block walls (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

There is also:
- a large Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) located in the centre of the driveway turning circle at the rear of the house;
- some young Quercus robur (European oak trees) planted from acorns reputedly collected in Hyde Park, London (?)(LEP, 1990).

The oldest mature trees in the garden appear to be a Bhutan cypress (Cupressus torulosa) immediately south-west of the house which shades its small back yard, two or three large old 'English' oaks (Quercus robur) in the garden's eastern end, one on the north and southern borders, and two large pin oaks (Q.palustris) to the north of the swimming pool.

Other plantings appear to date from the mid-late twentieth century, perhaps from (perhaps part of works following the 1961 earthquake, or) the 1970s. A wide range of conifers including cypresses, cedars (including a rare specimen of weeping Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca Pendula'), West Himalayan spruce (Picea smithiana) and weeping golden thread cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa 'Conybearei' / 'Saligna Aurea') and large-growing evergreen shrubs such as Portuguese laurel (Prunus lusitanica), sweet bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), a wide selection of Camellia japonica cv.s along the northern border (including a white formal double with fine red spots, C.j. 'Helenor' (Charlotte Webb, pers.comm., 24/10/2012), a keyaki (Zelkova serrata) or a Caucasian elm (Z.carpinifolia) frame the borders and the garden's edges. The garden is fenced on the northern and eastern sides, and walled on the southern and western (partly the latter, by outbuildings).

A range of spring-flowering bulbs are planted in rough lawn either side of the mown central lawn, and a range of smaller flowering shrubs also fill in the borders.

A sweep of lawn runs from the front verandah east and down a slight slope to a swimming pool and pavilion with a colonnade around it. Borders of banks of shrubs and trees flank both sides of this. An open lawn area south of the house runs around to its south-western side where this becomes a small rear yard, flanked by outbuildings.

At the garden's north-eastern corner is a hedge screening a fenced formal vegetable garden with a range of well-kept fruit such as currants, raspberries, strawberries in raised beds and open-ground beds of vegetables (Stuart Read, pers.comm., visit 12/8/2012).

Homestead Group:
The homestead group at the farm's core consists of:
- homestead - built 1870 - (WI0001)(built 1869 according to Keighley, 1984)(more detail below);
- stone meathouse (WI0002);
- original, sandstone two-storey barn/stables;
- weatherboard woolshed (WI0003)(LEP, 1990);
- several machinery sheds (National Trust, c.2006);
- a double garage;
- a single garage; &
- carriage house (Keighley, 1984).

Other homestead group elements include:
- stone footings to the southwest of the stone woolshed (possibly from earlier, 1856 house?), and
- a driveway passing to the rear (western side) of the house. (The site gives no indication that the house has ever been accessible from the front; there seems to be no other alignment for the drive than the present one which passes the rear of the house and ends at the stone footings near the woolshed to the house's north);
- an inner protected courtyard formed by the homestead and the meathouse extended by the addition of new rendered
- walls creating an enclosed walled garden at the side of the house with a newly planted garden within. (LEP, 1990);
- a couple of weatherboard cottages;
- a stone stables/coach house with a more modern weatherboard shearing shed attached on one side. It is possible that the stables/coach house is older than the main house;
- older picket fences on the north and west of the garden have been replaced by high, stone-capped concrete block walls (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

Homestead:
Fine two storey sandstone Georgian house facing south-east with a steep iron roof with two chimneys (AHC, 1978). The house follows the Georgian (Revival) tradition with a symmetrical disposition of its shuttered French doors on the ground floor and twelve-paned windows on the first floor (Keighley, 1984). The lower storey has a substantial verandah across the front which returns half way along either side of the house, supported on timber columns. Very fine rd cedar joinery throughout the house is of good quality (AHC, 1978), most of which is intact (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

Internally the arrangement of rooms is not quite so formal. In two rooms corner fire-places are used. In the front room on the right of the 7'6" (2.3m) wide hall, there is a corner fire-place with a black marble mantlepiece. Strangely, the wall on one side of the fireplace has been opened into the next space by a large flattened arch. A similar arch is used to articulate the hall (Keighley, 1984). The original colour scheme and friezes were discovered by the builder but have not been followed in repainting (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

Original floor boards exist in the dining room and rare cedar woodwork and doors are throughout. The building boasts an entry hall, music room, library, drawing room and dining room each of which have beautiful French windows and solid fuel fireplaces (National Trust, c2006). Marble fireplace, slate fireplace, cedar fireplaces, cedar staircase (Keighley, 1984).

There are three large bedrooms on the first floor, the main bedroom having the addition of a dressing room and bathroom.

At the rear an enclosed court is formed by the kitchen wings (AHC, 1978). At the rear of the homestead, a courtyard is formed by the 24' (7.3m) long kitchen block and the wing which contains the meat room and laundry. All three buildings are in sandstone (Keighley, 1984).

The sandstone kitchen block is a separate building accessed by the conservatory.
The former servants' room is now the laundry/pantry/meat room block (Keighley, 1984) and there is an adjoining meat room (National Trust, c2006).

The additions are generally reasonably sympathetic in manner and have been undertaken in order to make the house comfortable as a 'gentleman's residence'. The single storey verandah across the front and two sides has been contiued along the rear (north) wall to give shelter to the kitchen courtyard, and on the east side, the verandah has been extended and enclosed to provide a breakfast room and sheltered access to the kitchen wing. The interior of the kitchen wing has been extensively refurbished and a new double garage has been built on the north side of the courtyard in a style and materials mimicking the laundry/meathouse next to it (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Well maintained (Keighley, 1984).
Red cedar joinery throughout, most of which is intact (Heritage Branch Manager's report, 1986).
Date condition updated:15 Aug 12
Modifications and dates: 1870s: property was part of Carter's holdings of 40,000 acres.

1961: chimneys were replaced with concrete covers after 1961 earthquake; modernisation of kitchen and wet areas; a number of detail changes eg loss of shutters; verandah rebuilt and enclosed along north wall in 1985; previous verandah enclosure along south wall has been removed; open space at rear of house formerly flanked by kitchen and separate cottage is now enclosed as a 3 sided courtyard (by construction of a garage) and paved with sandstone; both the house and outbuildings show signs of repair after 1961 earthquake (LEP, 1989).

1984: Restoration/adaptation of and additions to the house, kitchen block, laundry/dairy block, enclosed the sandstone-paved courtyard further by adding a sandstone garage. The northern wing has been connected to the main homestead by a north-facing conservatory (Keighley, 1984) - on its north-eastern side... bringing more sunlight inside the house (National Trust, c.2006). Changes also included construction of the Italian loggia and swimming pool.
The original colour scheme and friezes.

The additions are generally reasonably sympathetic in manner and have been undertaken in order to make the house comfortable as a 'gentleman's residence'. The single storey verandah across the front and two sides has been contiued along the rear (north) wall to give shelter to the kitchen courtyard, and on the east side, the verandah has been extended and enclosed to provide a breakfast room and sheltered access to the kitchen wing. The interior of the kitchen wing has been extensively refurbished and a new double garage has been built on the north side of the courtyard in a style and materials mimicking the laundry/meathouse next to it (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

1990: property was 560 acres (LEP, 1990).

2007: On 23 June the National Trust auctioned 95 acres of 'Golden Vale', part of 300 acres recently very generously gifted to the Trust by the late Hon. W.G Keighley OAM and his wife Karin. We are very grateful to the Keighleys for this extraordinary gift - Golden Vale has been home to the Keighley family for over 60 years, and Mrs Keighley and a manager still look after the day to day care of the property and homestead. The money raised will go into an endowment fund to preserve Golden Vale's homestead and garden. (Source: newsletter@nsw.nationaltrust.org.au)

National trust Magazine NSW November 2008-January 2009:
Golden Vale: $53,098 was allocated to support all management aspects of the property including building and ground maintenance.
Further information: Registered by the Australian Heritage Commission.
The property nestles between Oldbury and Newbury farms at the foot of Mt Gingenbullen (south).

A possible management threat was hard rock mining (pending the outcome of a Commission of Inquiry into hard rock mining within the WIngecarribee Shire - on Mt.GIngenbullen directly north of Golden Vale (1984) - blasting would crack its sandstone walls and dust...(Keighley, 1984).
Current use: country residence, farm
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, country residence and farm

History

Historical notes: Golden Vale was originally called Golden Valley by ex-convict Thomas Wilmott when he was granted the land in 1842 a short distance from the west bank of the Medway Rivulet and below the western slopes of Mount Gingenbullen. After receiving his ticket-of-leave in 1822, Wilmott amassed some wealth and was a successful innkeeper in the Berrima district. He also became owner of several properties besides Golden Valley. Historian Linda Emery's book 'Tales from a Churchyard' gives a history of the Wilmott family.

Edward Carter was son of free settlers Benjamin and Ann Carter who settled in the district in 1836 (National Trust, c2006), having purchased Golden Valley from Wilmott in July 1836 (National Trust, c2006; Heritage Branch Manager's report 126/1986, 18/4/1986). Edward and his family initially lived in a modest brick home on the farm. This original dwelling was nearer Medway Rivulet and has since disappeared (LEP, 1990; National Trust, c2006). The present Golden Vale homestead was completed in 1869 (Branch Manager's report 126/1986).

Benjamin Carter, father of Edward, first worked for Hannibal Macarthur at Bargo and, in 1836, built a stone house on the Emu Creek, west of Berrima, where he had purchased 60 acres (24.3ha). Over the next 44 years, these grew to 18,000 acres (7284ha), listed on the parish maps, but in reality, because he had purchased key blocks (which commanded entrances to steep valleys) through astute management, he held over 40,000 acres (16,190ha).

So by 1880, Edward owned Joadja, Bangadilly, Burganglo, Nandi, The Gap, Tugalong, Golden Vale and Evandale, besides the original Emu Creek holding (Keighley, 1984). The majority of his land was between the Old Hume Highway and the Wollondilly River, west of Berrima, as well as in the Joadja Valley (National Trust, c.2006) by astute management.

Benjamin Carter discovered kerosene shale in the Joadja Valley in 1852 (LEP, 1989)(NB: Branch Manager's report 126/86 says his son Edward discovered kerosene shale in the Joadja Valley and began mining it in about 1873.

In 1873, Edward, having noticed a similarity between samples of Hartley shale at the 1869 Sydney Show and a black outcrop on his land (in 1852)(in the Joadja Valley), exposed by wear of cattle hooves, took out a claim and, after winning several court cases against other claimants, began mining the valuable kerosene shale (Keighley, 1984; National Turst, c2006; Heritage Branch Manager's Report, 1986). He later (1878) sold out to the Australian Kerosene Oil and Minerals Company (Keighley, 1984; National Trust, c2006) to concentrate on his grazing activities (National Trust, c.2006). Upon Benjamin's death in 1857, Edward inherited his father's substantial land holdings, approximately 18,000 acres. Golden Valley homestead was completed in 1870 (in 1868 says the SMH (2005)).

The Golden Valley property was known for its annual kangaroo hunt which lasted for several days (LEP, 1990). A newspaper report in 1871 described a kangaroo hunt here: "The annual hunt at Nandi came of fon tuesday, wednesday and thursday last with the greatest success...Edward Carter Esq. of Golden Vale, Sutton, on whose estate this established annual meeting takes place. Thirty-two huntsmen, forty four dogs and forty-eight horses comprised the equipment and the grand total killed in the two and a half days was 76 kangaroos and 15 joeys". (Keighley, 1984).

The existing homestead was built by Edward to accommodate his wife and family and his youngest son was born there in 1870 (National Trust, c2006). As Albert Carter, sone of Edward Carger and his wife, Mary Ann Rebekah Steele (nee Hanslow), is said to have been their only son born in the present homestead, it is assumed that the house dates from the late 1860s (elsewhere he cites 1869)(Keighley, 1984).

The Carter family had become important leaders in the district by the time Golden Valley homestead was built. In 1879 Alfred, Edward's eldest son, left Golden Vale and moved to the property Lake Edward at Crookwell. Edward and his sons ran sheep and cattle and bred some very fine horses at the Crookwell and Sutton Forest properties over the following years.

By 1898 Alfred had married and managed all the family properties. Edward Carter died in 1903 and was buried at All Saints Church in Sutton Forest. He had seen his family fortune increase over the years and was able to leave each son a sizeable holding.

In 1904 Alfred returned to live at Golden Valley with his wife and small son, Walter. Alfred died in 1922 and Walter left Golden Vale five years later to return to his original home at Crookwell.

The Carters sold Golden Vale at the end of the 1930s (to Sir Phillip Goldfinch)(LEP, 1990).
In 1939 Golden Valley was sold to Sir Phillip Goldfinch who retained the property until his death in 1943.

In 1943 Mr Frank Keighley, of 'Myddelton' (Mt.Eymard) in Bowral, purchased Golden Valley from the executors of the Goldfinch estate. This property remained in the Keighley family until 2004 (National Trust, c.2006).

In 1984 The Hon.W.G.Keighley requested that Wingecarribee Shire Council rename the property 'Golden Vale', back to its original name before the 1940s, noting he would like to regain its historical name and also that Sir Phillip Street had named his Canyonleigh property 'Golden Valley' and this could lead to confusion (letter of 18/4/1984 on file). The Hon.W.G.Keighley requested in 1984 that the Heritage Council place an order over the property under the Heritage Act 1977. He noted that the property was then 'dwindled to 1400 acres' running Hereford cattle, the house was being restored, as well as the kitchen block, laundry/dairy block and that they had enclosed the sandstone-paved courtyard further by adding a sandstone garage, noting all additions had been approved by the National Trust of Australia (NSW). At the time a hard rock mine on nearby Mt.Gingenbullen (to Golden Vale's immediate north) was proposed, something the Keighleys opposed (letter of 30/6/1984 on file).

In 1984 some changes took place including construction of the Italian loggia and swimming pool. On the north-eastern side of the homestead a conservatory was added, bringing more sunlight inside the house (National Trust, c.2006).

In 1990 it comprised 560 hectares and was still run as a cattle enterprise with some sheep (LEP, 1990).

2004: Golden Vale was gifted to the National Trust of Australia (NSW) by The Hon. Geoffrey Keighley OAM & Karin Keighley (SMH, 2005). Le Seuer (2015, 7) cites the date of the gift as 2005.

The Hon. Geoffrey Keighley OAM:
Geoffrey Keighley (1925-2005) made his mark as a stylish (cricket) batsman in England, then became an Australian grazier, businessman and member of the upper house of the NSW Parliament (SMH, 2005). He was perhaps the most significant exception ever allowed to the 'country-born only' rule at Yorkshire before it collapsed in 1991 (Wisden Cricketer's Almanac, obituary (part), in Australian Garden History Society, 2012).

Born in Nice (into a family with interests in Yorkshire and NSW, his cricketing talent was fostered at Tudor House preparatory school in Moss Vale (NSW) before he was sent to Eton (SMH, 2005). He played 35 (cricket) matches as an amateur between 1947 and 1951, apparently without comment or complaint. His father was a well-known Bradford industrialist; and Keighley was an Eton and Trinity College, Oxford-educated opening bat(sman) with a classical style, seen as a potential captain (Wisden Cricketer's Almanac, obituary (part), in Australian Garden History Society, 2012).

After being called up by the Royal Air Force, he trained as a navigator in Canada but never flew in operations. On returning to Oxford he ... played 65 first-class matches, which included a tour of Canada with the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). Although asked to captain the MCC, Yorkshire and Middlesex, he now had other interests. After being admitted to the Bar, he married Olivia Lubbock, sister of the 4th Lord Avebury, and decided to farm (on 1000 acres) in Australia.

The Keighley family had founded and owned Bradford Cotton Mills (Bradmill) and his father and uncle had started Westminster Carpets in Melbourne in the 1930s. Despite being offered grander cricketing opportunities in England, Keighley was happy to captain Stockinbingal and Cootamundra in the NSW premierships for a few years, and was later admitted to the NSW bar.

By taking government advice on the careful use of new fertilisers and grasses at Stockinbingal, he trebled farm production and won four district pasture competitions. He bought 400 hectares of the Golden Vale farm at Sutton Forest from his uncle, which he added to, before inheriting the remainder of the land on the uncle's death.

In addition to being a member of Narraburra Shire Council, of which he was president from 1963 to 1967, Keighley was a director of Westminster Carpets. Since Melbourne was more than 900 kilometres away, he learnt to fly, becoming the first private pilot to gain a first-class instrument rating in Australia.

For 13 years, he was a Country Party member of the NSW Legislative Council, in which he was the first to introduce private member's bills to decriminalise abortion and the use of marijuana, changes that subsequently became law.

As chairman of the Cattlemen's Union during the depression in cattle farming in the mid-1970s, he flew his fellow directors to meetings all over eastern Australia in his Beechcraft Duke, and represented Australia 13 times at international agricultural producers' meetings.

He played a key part in achieving the Andriesson Agreement, which prevented the dumping of European beef in Asian markets, and also became chairman of the Car Owners' Association during its successful fight against Australia's high tariffs on imports.

After a divorce from his first wife, with whom he had two sons and two daughters, Keighley married Karin Spiegel, the daughter of a German diplomatic family... He and his wife restored Golden Vale, an old colonial sandstone house built in 1868, filling it with an extensive library (SMH, 2005).

He ... became the epitome, as one obituarist put it, of the professional amateur. He ... learned to fly and paint, filled his house with art treasures, and ran a classical-music radio station, as well as creating a garden full of wonderful trees at Golden Vale (Wisden Cricketer's Almanac, obituary (part), quoted in Australian Garden History Society, 8/2012).

It was given to the nation under the care of the National Trust a few months before his death. They also ran a classical music station and sponsored young musicians, and he chaired the Southern Highlands Arts Festival. In his early 60s he took up painting. In his late 60s he had riding lessons after taking up fox hunting. Keighley was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 2002 (SMH, 2005).

2007: On 23 June the National Trust of Australia (NSW) auctioned 95 acres of Golden Vale, part of 300 acres recently gifted to the Trust by the late The Hon. W.G. (Geoffrey) Keighley OAM and his wife Karin. Mrs Keighley and a manager still look after the day to day care of the property and homestead. The money raised by the auction will go into an endowment fund to preserve Golden Vale's homestead and garden. (Source: (National Trust of Australia (NSW), 2007, newsletter@nsw.nationaltrust.org.au).

1500 volunteers, working in collaboration with Rebecca Pinchin, Manager, Collections have been meticulously cataloguing and documenting 1500 items in the collections at Golden Vale and Retford Park (NTA(NSW), 10/2018, 13).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Attempting to transplant European farming practices to Australian environments-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Mining-Activities associated with the identification, extraction, processing and distribution of mineral ores, precious stones and other such inorganic substances. Mining for oil shales-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Patronising artistic endeavours-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to industrial structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Georgian revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Georgian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial vernacular-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Belonging to an historical society or heritage organisation-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Remembering the deceased-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. W.G. (Geoffrey) Keighley OAM, NSW Parliamentarian, grazier and cricketer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Benjamin Carter, grazier and kerosene shale miner-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Carter, grazier, shale oil miner-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Wilmott, ex-convict farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Frank Keighley, farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Geoffrey Keighley OAM, cricketer, businessman, politician-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act General & garden maintenance


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, tree surgery but not including extensive lopping;
Oct 10 1986
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0048902 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0048910 Oct 86 1614977
Regional Environmental PlanIllawarra REP no.1 11 Apr 86   
Local Environmental Plan  12 Jan 90   
National Trust of Australia register National Trust Country Register5197; 346431 May 76   
Register of the National Estate 613521 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Wingecarribee Heritage Survey1991WI0001-0005JRC Planning ServicesJocelyn Colleran No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAustralian Garden History Society, Southern Highlands Branch2012Golden Vale visit on AGM day, Sunday 12th August View detail
WrittenCantlon, Maurice1981Homesteads of Southern New South Wales 1830-1900
WrittenCarter, John1984information on the Carter family history
WrittenHeritage Branch Manager1986Heritage Branch Manager's Report, 18/4/1986
WrittenKeighley, The Hon. W.G.1984Heritage Council of NSW - nomination form
WrittenLe Seuer, Angela2015'National Trust celebrates its 70th anniversary'
WrittenThe National Trust of Australia (NSW)2006Golden Vale (brochure) View detail
WrittenThe Telegraph, London2005(Obituary: Geoffrey Keighley, Grazie, businessman, politician, 1925-2005) "Old boy networker found his niche in NSW"

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045401
File number: S90/03817 & HC 33139


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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