Warbys Barn & Warbys Stables | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Warbys Barn & Warbys Stables

Item details

Name of item: Warbys Barn & Warbys Stables
Other name/s: The Leumeah Barn, Leumeah Barn Restaurant, Campbelltown Motor Inn
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Stables
Location: Lat: -34.0581886081 Long: 150.8235198190
Primary address: 14 - 20 Queen Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560
Parish: St Peter
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP216516
PART LOTB DP449236
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
14 - 20 Queen StreetCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The Leumeah Barn (Warby’s Barn) and Warby’s Stable are significant remains of one of the earliest farms of the Campbelltown district. Their strong historical associations with the district’s evolution and settlement pattern are reinforced by their location within a suburb names after Leumeah House. (Branch Managers Report to the Heritage Council 24 April 1985)
Date significance updated: 22 Oct 12
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John Warby
Construction years: 1816-1816
Physical description: Both buildings are simple sandstone structures rectangular in shape with gable roofs. The barn had large central arched openings in front and rear and symmetrically placed patterned ventilation gaps in the stonework. These have been removed through the insertion of windows and doorways. The stables are less altered. Porches have been added to both buildings. (Branch Managers Report to the Heritage Council 24 April 1985)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Archaeological potential is high.
Date condition updated:14 Mar 01
Current use: Commerical
Former use: Barn & Stores

History

Historical notes: Campbelltown:
Permanent European settlement in the Campbelltown area had begun in 1809 as an alternative to the flood-prone Hawkesbury district. Work on a road from Sydney to Liverpool was started in 1811. It was opened in August 1814 and was soon extended further south to Appin. This road, variously known as Campbelltown Road, Appin Road or the Sydney Road, passed through Campbelltown. The section through the town was called the High Street until the last decade of the 19th century when it was renamed Queen Street (Orwell & Peter Phillips, 1995, vol.2, 1-2).

The land on which the Queen Street cottages stand was part of a grant of 140 acres to Joseph Phelps in 1816. He had been working the land for some years before receiving formal title to it. Phelps was one of the farmers of Airds and Appin who subscribed funds for a Sydney courthouse in July 1813. His grant was seized, possibly as soon as it was formally issued, by the Provost Marshal, William Gore in lieu of payment by Phelps of debts totalling 170 pounds. THe land was auctioned in January 1817 to William Bradbury for 100 pounds plus twelve cattle and the grain produced from the crop growing on the land (ibid, 1995).


Immediately north of Phelps' grant, Assistant Surveyor James Meehan had informally reserved 175 acres for a village (AMCG, 1994 say 'in 1815'.) In 1816 most of the land in the area was granted, leaving a portion of 175 acres unalienated, and surrounded by several grants (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The reserved land was formally declared a town by Governor Macquarie in December 1820 and named Campbelltown in honour of his wife (Elizabeth)'s family (ibid, 1995).

William Bradbury (1774-1836) a native of Birmingham, was transported to NSW aboard the 'Guildford' in 1812. His wife Elizabeth remained in England but his daughter, Mary (1797-1852) followed her father to Australia in 1815. Bradbury had no other children in NSW, though he established a relationship with a woman named Alice and in April 1836 married a Campbelltown widow, Catherine Patrick, nee Acres (c.1801-1883). Bradbury died two months later (ibid, 1995, 2).

Governor Macquarie visited Campbelltown in January 1822. He and his party ate a 'hearty' breakfast at 'Bradbury's', indicating that Bradbury had built an inn. This was probably the inn later known as the Royal Oak, on the western side of the High Street. Macquarie noted in his journal that 'Bradbury is building a very good two storey brick house on his own farm and on a very pretty eminence immediately adjoining Campbell-Town as an inn for the accommodation fo the public, and having asked me to give his farm a name, I have called it Bradbury Park. In 1826 Bradbury Park House was considered by William Dumaresq, inspector of roads and bridges, as the best building in Campbelltown when he reported on buildings suitable for military use (ibid, 1995, 2).

As the main street of Campbelltown, High Street or Sydney Road and later Queen Street, was at the edge of town, one side of the street was not within the town boundary while the other was. Canny traders soon realised that either side of the main road was as good as the other and leased or bought land from the grantees bordering the town proper. By the 1840s more than a few shops and hotels occupied the western side of the High Street. The coming of the railway in 1858 also aided in securing the commercial focus of the town on Queen Street (AMCG, 1994, 9).

The Queen Street terraces were identified by Helen Baker (Proudfoot) in the early 1960s as a unique group of two-storey late Georgian vernacular buildings which were considered to form the only surviving late-1840s streetscape within the County of Cumberland. The buildings were acquired by the Cumberland County Council and its successors, the State Planning Authority and Department of Planning, to ensure their preservation (ibid, 1995, 1).

Warby's Barn:
John Warby (1744? - 1851), a convict, explorer and later farmer was convicted at Hertford England on 3 March 1791 and sentenced to transportation for seven years. He reached Sydney in February 1792 in the ship , 'Pitt'. On 12 September 1796 he married another convict, Sarah Bentley (1780-1869) who had arrived in the Indispensable in April 1796 at Parramatta. They had nine sons and five daughters. One of the sons, John Warby was the first settler in the North Gundagai area.

Warby settled on 50 acres at Prospect after his sentence expired. In 1803 he was appointed stockman of the wild cattle at large in the Cowpastures.

Warby became well known as an explorer and guide in the Camden area and Burragorang Valley, leading Governor Macquarie and his party from Prospect Hill through the Cowpastures in November 1810 and again in October 1815 on an expedition along the Nattai River.

In June 1816 and at the age of 49, he was rewarded for his public services with a grant of 260 acres at Campbelltown. In the same year Warby built the first three rooms of Leumeah House, the stables and the barn. Further work to the main house using sandstock bricks was subsequently done in 1826. At one time there were no less than 40 servants housed in the stables to service the needs of the Warby establishment, At age 84 John Warby died on 12 June 1851. Sarah Warby lived on at Campbelltown and died there on 19 October 1869 (Australian Dictionary of Biography).

Leumeah House was demolished in 1963, but the barn and stables associated with the farmstead survived.

In 1962 Mr John Feeney purchased The Leumeah Barn (Warby's Barn) and Warbys Stables which were now in a derelict condition. Mr Feeney restored and renovated the building converting it into a residence. In completing the work care was taken not to alter the exterior of the building and to retain many of the original features such as the fire place, half log roof beams, the carriage arch and the window and door openings. (Feeney, 2012)

In 1979 Mr Feeney sold the property and the barn was converted into a block of flats and the stables into a restaurant called Sids Leumeah Barn Restaurant (Branch Managers Report, 24 April 1985)

During 1985 the Heritage Council received community strong representation expressing concern for the future of Warby's Barn and Warby's Stable. On 24 March 1985 the Heritage Council recommended the placing of an Interim Heritage Order over Warby's Barn and Warby's Stable. An Interim Heritage Order was placed on 31 May 1985. The order was placed to provide time for further inquiry and investigation to determine whether it was necessary to warrant the making of a Permanent Conservation Order.

On 26 June 1985 the Heritage Council approved, subject to conditions, the conversion of Warby's Barn to a Motor Inn.

On 25 November 1986 the Heritage Council recommended placing a Permanent Conservation order over Warby's Barn and Warby's Stable. Public notice was given of the proposal to place a Permanent Conservation Order. The Heritage Council received an objection to the extent of the listing.

To ensure continued protection a second Interim Conservation Order was placed 22 May 1987. Following discussion with the owner of Warby's Barn and Warby's Stable an adjustment to the proposed boundary of the Permanent Conservation Order was made. The objection to the Permanent Conservation Order was subsequently withdrawn.

The Permanent Conservation order was placed on 22 January 1988. Warby's Barn and Warby's Stable was listed on the State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

By 2011 after being empty for a number of years Warbys Barn was converted into a health centre. (Feeney 2012)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Farming by emancipated convicts on land grants-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming by convict emancipists-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming with convict labour-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Exploration-Activities associated with making places previously unknown to a cultural group known to them. (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Vernacular towns serving a specific industry-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Aaron Muron Bolot, architect-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0049702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0049722 Jan 88 120374

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written 1985Branch Managers Report to the Heritage Council
Written  Australian Dictionary of Biography
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Campbelltown Heritage Walk View detail
WrittenMr John Feeney2012The restoration and renovation of The Leumeah Barn Warby's Stables
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips Architects1995Conservation Management Plan - 288-294 Queen Street, Campbelltown

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045445
File number: S90/03564 & HC 33316


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