St. Jude's Anglican Church, Cemetery, Rectory, Vergers Residence | NSW Environment & Heritage

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St. Jude's Anglican Church, Cemetery, Rectory, Vergers Residence

Item details

Name of item: St. Jude's Anglican Church, Cemetery, Rectory, Vergers Residence
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Church
Location: Lat: -33.9120415668 Long: 151.2421235660
Primary address: 102-108 Avoca Street, Randwick, NSW 2031
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Randwick
Local Aboriginal Land Council: La Perouse
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
   CP/SP69277
LOT572 DP752011
LOT1 DP840568
LOT260 DP979237
LOT497 DP979237
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
102-108 Avoca StreetRandwickRandwickAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address
BOUND BY The AvenueRandwickRandwick  Alternate Address
BOUND BY Alison StreetRandwickRandwick  Alternate Address
Frances Street, The Avenue, Alison RoadRandwickRandwickAlexandriaCumberlandAlternate Address
Frances StreetRandwickRandwickAlexandriaCumberlandDuplicate Address
BOUND BY Avoca StreetRandwickRandwick  Duplicate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Trustees St Judes ChurchReligious Organisation25 Mar 99

Statement of significance:

The St Jude's precinct and buildings show an uninterrupted progression of history from approximately 1861 to 1899. The precinct has strong links with the founder of Randwick, Simeon Pearce and with the Municipality of Randwick. The precinct is one of the best maintained and clearly visible examples of the early colonial concept, further romanticised in the work of Edmund Blacket, of transposing a typically soft English churchyard scene to the harsh Australian environment. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:31,33). The buildings and the precinct display a perfect unity, possibly umatched anywhere in the Sydney Metropolitan Area and the whole represents an almost perfect example of a typical English village churchyard, unspoilt by the passage of time. The cemetery is one of the best maintained Victorian cemeteries and inspiring places in the Sydney region (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:31). St Jude's Church and precinct is a witness to the whole of the history of Randwick, its emergence as a suburb and its growth into a community. The church building particularly is a clear landmark in Randwick and beyond. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:32,33)
Date significance updated: 26 Oct 04
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Edmund Blacket or Simeon Pearce
Construction years: 1861-1865
Physical description: The Church:
A large Victorian Gothic Church building constructed of solid masonry walls, performed stone arches, traceried windows and keystones to and about doors and window openings. It is a solid structure with engaged buttresses. The tower is divided by decorative string courses and the transept and chancel ends are gabled with continuous stone copings. The roof is slate with ventilation ridges and copper gutters and downpipes. Flashings to and about parapets and tower are made of lead.

Internally stone arches rise above simple block capital stone piers and the whole is bathed in the warm light of stained glass. The traceried windows are one of the most magnificent aspects of the church and are in memory of such people as Bishop Barker, Archbishop Saumarez Smith, Simeon Pearce, George Kiss, Lady Charlotte Mary See, Canon Cakebread, Rev O.V. Abrams, the Vickers family amongst others. The roof, of stained timber, is supported on trusses the ends of which sit upon stone corbelled 'saddle' blocks. Building materials are mainly sandstone and timber although marble has been used in the sanctuary.

The lych gate, located at the street frontage directly opposite the main entrance of the church, is a very simple neat structure sympathetic to its surroundings and being built into and part of, the main stone walls (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:9,10)

The Rectory:
A two storey Victorian Gothic church residence. It is a pleasant asymmetrical design in sandstone, the quoins being articulated. A delicate cast iron verandahed porch marks the entrance and is enclosed at the north by a single storey wing of similar style but apparently built later. The slate gabled roof is decorated by carved barge boards and finials. Windows are of double hung type with flat lintels and generally grouped in pairs (Chivell and Sheedy 1976)

The Verger's Residence:
A two storey sandstone building of symmetrical design. The jerkin-headed slate roof is punctuated by a central octagonal tower over the entrance and roofed with a segmental domed roof and spirelet. The double-hung windows are grouped in pairs and the facade is relieved by a deep striking course and articulated quoins. The keystones in the arched central openings are decorated with carved faces and further interest is given by carved panels in the tower walls (Chivell and Sheedy 1976)

The Parish Hall:
A large cumbersome building, constructed of red brick and having a corrugated steel and slate roof and timber joinery. Walls are constructed with shaped brick buttresses, windows are tall and lancet shaped. The east elevation has a somewhat Byzantine appearance with semi-circular windows and openings, stone pilasters and string courses and a heavy wrought iron grille to the front entry. Coping courses are stone and/or cement render and stonework has been used to accentuate certain elements in the design. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:12)

The Cemetery:
The Cemetery occupies an area of approximately 0.96 hectares (Clarke, 1980). It is located behind the church and was in use before the current church was completed. It is sublime in character, well-kept, respected and full of interesting characters. The first burial was Edwin David Daintrey, infant son of Edwin and Susan, who died 2/9/1859, just 11 weeks and 3 days old (Murray, 2016, 37). Freesias (Cape bulbs) have naturalised across the cemetery from original grave plantings (ibid, 2016, 38). The earliest tomb is dated 1843 but this may have come from another site. The majority of burials occurred between 1865 and 1890s. The last burial was in 1975. There is a small modern brick columbarium on the western side of the cemetery (ibid, 1980). There is also a memorial garden at the rear (ibid, 2016, 38).

The graves are arranged in parallel rows and there is one major pathway axis running from the church, west towards the columbarium. The ground is fairly level with the exception of a small earth bank sloping away on the south side. The majority of monuments are tall, richly carved Victorian designs mostly in sandstone, with very few of marble or granite. Most family plots are surrounded by delicate cast iron fences. The dominant vegetation is mature Moreton Bay and Port Jackson figs, but there are numerous other trees including eucalypts and camphor laurels (ibid, 1980).

The well-heeled residents of the Eastern Suburbs have erected some impressive monuments here. Many of the iron grave surrounds are intact and form a neat catalogue of designs (ibid, 2016, 38).

National Trust Resoration Appeals - Helping the community to fund important works:
St Jude's in Randwick includes the 1865 Church, the 1862 original Randwick Borough Chambers, the 1870 Victorian Gothic Rectory, 1899 Parish School Hall and 1850s historic cemetery. Works over time have included repairs to the stonework of the Church, Rectory and Parish Hall, and conservation of walls, pillars, window mounldings, slate roofing, bells, Clock tower, organ, timber, tiling, pressed metal, flooring, paths, stone paving, ceilings, fencing and stained glass windows. Parishioners have responded generously to annual appeals for help, donating around $100,00 each year. Uses now include housing, a child care centre and new Parish Room, all sympathetic to the heritage of the site. (image opposite).
The Trust fund and 'bite-sized' approach has enabled much to be achieved. Major works planned over the next three years include re-doing the Church lighting, repointing the child care centre building (Parish School Hall) and stonework restoration of the upper section of the Bell and Clock Tower.
- The National Trust of Australia NSW - Annual Report 2011/12 - By the Rev Gregory Jobs - St Jude's Randwick
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good. Archaeological potential is low.
Date condition updated:01 Oct 97
Modifications and dates: 1853 - cemetery opened
1861 - foundation stone laid
1862 - Verger's residence constructed
1865 - church completed
1866 - church organ delivered
1870 - Rectory constructed
1877 - tower increased in height and chimimg clock installed
1889 - extensive alterations
1899 - Parish hall constructed
1927 - vestry added
1955 - columbarium constructed.
Current use: Church, rectory and cemetery
Former use: Church, rectory and cemetery

History

Historical notes: pre-1780s - local Aboriginal people in the area used the site for fishing and cultural activities - rock engravings, grinding grooves and middens remain in evidence.
1789 - Governor Philip referred to 'a long bay', which became known as Long Bay.
Aboriginal people are believed to have inhabited the Sydney region for at least 20,000 years (Turbet, 2001). The population of Aboriginal people between Palm Beach and Botany Bay in 1788 has been estimated to have been 1500. Those living south of Port Jackson to Botany Bay were the Cadigal people who spoke Dharug (Randwick Library webpage, 2003), while the local clan name of Maroubra people was "Muru-ora-dial" (City of Sydney webpage, 2003). By the mid nineteenth century the traditional owners of this land had typically either moved inland in search of food and shelter, or had died as the result of European disease or confrontation with British colonisers (Randwick City Library webpage, 2003).

Colonial History:
One of the earliest land grants in this area was made in 1824 to Captain Francis Marsh, who received 12 acres bounded by the present Botany & High Streets, Alison & Belmore Roads.

In the 1830s land purchases were made at Little Coogee by William Charles Wentworth and William C. Grenville, a clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office (Yeats, 2016, 19).

In 1839 William Newcombe acquired the land north-west of the present town hall in Avoca Street.

Randwick takes its name from the town of Randwick, Gloucestershire, England. The name was suggested by Simeon Pearce (1821-86) and his brother James. Simeon was born in the English Randwick and the brothers were responsible for the early development of both Randwick and its neighbour, Coogee. Simeon had come to the colony in 1841as a 21 year old surveyor. He built his Blenheim House on the 4 acres he bought from Marsh, and called his property "Randwick". The brothers bought and sold land profitably in the area and elsewhere. Simeon campaigned for construction of a road from the city to Coogee (achieved in 1853) and promoted the incorporation of the suburb. Pearce sought construction of a church modelled on the church of St. John in his birthplace. In 1857 the first St Jude's stood on the site of the present post office, at the corner of the present Alison Road and Avoca Street (Pollen, 1988, 217-8).

Randwick was...slow to progress. The village was isolated from Sydney by swamps and sandhills, and although a horse-bus was operated by a man named Grice from the late 1850s, the journey was more a test of nerves than a pleasure jaunt. Wind blew sand over the track, and the bus sometimes became bogged, so that passengers had to get out and push it free. From its early days Randwick had a divided society. The wealthy lived elegantly in large houses built when Pearce promoted Randwick and Coogee as a fashionable area. But the market gardens, orchards and piggeries that continued alongside the large estates were the lot of the working class. Even on the later estates that became racing empires, many jockeys and stablehands lived in huts or even under canvas. An even poorer group were the immigrants who existed on the periphery of Randwick in a place called Irishtown, in the area now known as The Spot, around the junction of St.Paul's Street and Perouse Road. Here families lived in makeshift houses, taking on the most menial tasks in their struggle to survive.

In 1858 when the NSW Government passed the Municipalities Act, enabling formation of municipal districts empowered to collect rates and borrow money to improve their suburb, Randwick was the first suburb to apply for the status of a municipality. It was approved in Februrary 1859, and its first Council was elected in March 1859.

Randwick had been the venue for sporting events, as well as duels and illegal sports, from the early days in the colony's history. Its first racecourse, the Sandy Racecourse or Old Sand Track, had been a hazardous track over hills and gullies since 1860. When a move was made in 1863 by John Tait, to establish Randwick Racecourse, Simeon Pearce was furious, expecially when he heard that Tait also intended to move into Byron Lodge. Tait's venture prospered, however and he became the first person in Australia to organise racing as a commercial sport. The racecourse made a big difference to the progress of Randwick. The horse-bus gave way to trams that linked the suburb to Sydney and civilisation. Randwick soon became a prosperous and lively place, and it still retains a busy residential, professional and commercial life.

Today, some of the houses have been replaced by home units. Many European migrants have made their homes in the areaa, along with students and workers at the nearby University of NSW and the Prince of Wales Hospital. (ibid, 218-9).

St.Jude's Church of England:
The site was originally a portion of a grant issued to Captain Francis Marsh, an officer of Her Majesty's 80th Regiment of Foot, on 21 September 1847 (Yeats, 2016, 20), being a portion of 12 acres (bounded by the present day Botany & High Streets, Alison & Belmore Roads) offered "as part liquidation of a remission of 200 pounds allowed to him as a Captain in the regiment." Captain Marsh sold his grant of land to George Hooper, a market gardener who erected a building and set about cultivating some of the land. Hooper also possessed extensive holdings adjoining what is now Queen's Park and had erected a stone house which stands in Gilderthorpe Avenue. On 21 September 1847, Simeon Pearce purchased 4 acres from George Hooper for 20 pounds. He subsequently sought from and was granted by the Government in 1854, a block of land in Avoca Street, next to the land previously purchased (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:7-8). This grant was for the purpose of erecting a school, church and parsonage.

Simeon Pearce was a prominent and enthusiastic lay worker for the Church of England in New South Wales. He had considerable influence throughout the community and was devoted to church activities and associated charities. He was also a very shrewd, ambitious and hard employer. Church services were held in Pearce's residence, Blenheim House, until the completion of St. Jude's Church. It was the express wish of three trustees to the land grant, Simeon Pearce, S. Hebblewhite and W.B. Holdsworthy that a larger and more imposing church be erected when funds became available and the population justified it (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:6-6).

Randwick takes its name from the town of Randwick, Gloucestershire, England. The name was suggested by Simeon Pearce (1821-86) and his brother James. Simeon was born in the English Randwick and the brothers were responsible for the early development of both Randwick and its neighbour, Coogee. Simeon had come to the colony in 1841as a 21 year old surveyor. He built his Blenheim House on the 4 acres he bought from Marsh, and called his property Randwick. The brothers bought and sold land profitably in the area and elsewhere. Simeon campaigned for construction of a road from the city to Coogee (achieved in 1853) and promoted the incorporation of the suburb. Pearce sought the construction of a church modelled on the church of St. John in his birthplace. In 1857 the first St Jude's stood on the site of the present post office, at the corner of the present Alison Road and Avoca Street (Pollen, 1988, 218). It was built on land later occupied by the Randwick Post Office (Yeats, 2016, 19).

Differing views exist as to who was the architect for St Jude's. Simeon Pearce has been suggested, as well as Edmund Blacket. The central tower and buttressed side aisles were said to be inspired by the Parish Church of St. John in Randwick, Gloucestershire. The foundation stone was laid on the 25th May 1861 by either The Rt. Rev. Dr. Frederick Barker or by Canon Allwood, the then Rector of St. James Church, King Street, Sydney. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:6,8; Chivell and Sheedy 1976).

St. Jude's Cemetery opened in 1853 as part of a larger cemetery grant for all denominations. Public agitation against the possible pollution of Sydney's water supply caused the closure of the other sections in the 1860s, however St. Jude's remained. (Clarke 1980).

The cemetery is older than the present church building. The earliest date discernable on tombstones is 1843, but it is believed that some of the graves could be much older. Many well-known early settlers are buried in this graveyard, including NSW Colonial Secretary Edward Deas, Sir Alfred Stephen and bushranger Ben Hall's pursuer Sir Frederick Pottinger (Yeats, 2016, 20).

It is a veritable roll call of the rich and famous in the late 19th century. At least eight religious ministers are memorialised, including Archdeadon William Cowper (d.1858) whose remains were reinterred from the Devonshire Street Anglican Cemetery (ibid, 2016, 37-38). Notable graves include Ann Hordern (c1793-1871), matriarch of the retail empire Anthony Hordern & Son; civil servant, land agent and 'father of Randwick', Simeon Henry Pearce (1821-1886); and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and legislator, Sir Alfred Stephen (1802-94)(Murray, 2016, 37-39). Other prominent citizens and families of the 19th century buried here include pastoralist, politician, son of John Busby of 'Busby's Bore' fame, William Busby (1813-87); Benjamin Darley, The Reverend Cowper, Sir Frederick William Pottinger and merchant, pastoralist and namesake of the suburb of Mosman, whaler Archibald Mosman (1799-1863)(ibid, 1980; biographical detail from Murray, 2016, 38-9).

The church has faced some difficulties and controversies over the past 150 years. The famous 'St. Jude's Case' was one. It comprised two cases: the first commenced in 1861. The legal action was to prevent Church trustees using proceeds from Frederick Jones' will to construct the second (present) St. Jude's Church. The first case was withdrawn on a technicality. In 1862 the parties returned to the Equity Court. In the end to Judge ruled in favour of the trustees. By then a sizeable proportion of the original bequest had been taken up with legal fees (Yeats, 2016, 20).

In 1862 the Verger's residence was built at a cost of 700 pounds and was designed by Thomas Rowe. It was originally used as the Randwick Council Chamber and Offices. It was purchased by the Church of England in 1895.

Two court cases held to determine the location of the church delayed construction of the church and as a result it was not completed until 29 June 1865.

In May 1865 the church organ was ordered from Mr. Walker of Tottenham Road London. It was delivered to Sydney in October 1866. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:10)

Plans for the Rectory commenced in 1866 and it was constructed in 1870.

In 1877 the church tower was increased to a height of 22.77 metres for the purpose of housing a chiming clock. The tower also has an excellent peal of eight bells, hung in the tower in 1872.

In 1888 the Architect Henry M Robinson was asked to add two transepts to blend with the existing building and the original chancel was extended to form a new chancel/sanctuary and provision for an organ chamber. The work was completed in six months and dedicated on 21st September 1889 at a cost of 2800 pounds.

The church was associated with many local identities, including 'the Barkers'. Frederick Barker was to become the second Bishop of Sydney and Mrs Jane Barker founded St. Catherine's School at Waverley (Yeats, 2016, 19).

The Parish Hall was constructed in 1899 and initially served as the St. Jude's Day School.

Canon Cakebread was rector between 1912 and 1939 (Yeats, 2016, 19).

In 1921 Mr E. Bossier designed the vestries to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of the Church. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:8)

In 1922 the lych gate at the street frontage, directly opposite the main entrance to the church, was constructed. The lych gate and wall were given by Edwin Fieldhouse. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:10)

In 1955 the columbarium was constructed.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of contemplation and devotion-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of remembrance-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Religious worship-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Anglicanism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Church-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Cemetery-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The St Jude's precinct and buildings show an uninterrupted progression of history from approximately 1861 to 1899. The precinct has strong links with the founder of Randwick, Simeon Pearce and with the Municipality of Randwick. The precinct is one of the best maintained and clearly visible examples of the early colonial concept, further romanticised in the work of Edmund Blacket, of transposing a typically soft English churchyard scene to the harsh Australian environment. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:31,33 )
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The buildings and the precinct display a perfect unity, possibly umatched anywhere in the Sydney Metropolitan Area and the whole represents an almost perfect example of a typical English village churchyard, unspoilt by the passage of time. The cemetery is one of the best maintained Victorian cemeteries and inspiring places in the Sydney Region. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:31) The church with its tower is a dominant building and has much appeal and value to the adjoining parks and streets. (Chivell and Sheedy 1976)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
St Jude's Church and precinct is a wtiness to the whole of the history of Randwick, its emergence as a suburb and its growth into a community. The church building particularly is a clear landmark in Randwick and beyond. (Woodhouse and Danks 1984:32,33)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0001202 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0001215 Aug 80 115 
Local Environmental PlanRandwick Local Environmental Plan 1998 - Sch3 30 Apr 99   
National Trust of Australia register   05 Apr 76   
National Trust of Australia register   14 Apr 80   
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenChivel and Sheedy1976National Trust of Australia (NSW) Classification Card
WrittenDominic Steele Consulting2002110-122 Avoca Street, Randwick, Sydney, NSW: Archaeological research design & excavation methodology in support of a Section 140 excavation permit application
WrittenGeoffrey R Danks Architect2004St Jude's Anglican Church Historic Report & Conservation Plan - heritage impact statement & statement of environmental effects: proposed child care centre & new parish centre building
WrittenMurray, Dr. Lisa2016'St. Jude's Anglican Cemetery, Randwick', in A Field Guide to Syndey's Cemeteries
WrittenPollen, F. & Healy, G.1988Randwick entry, in 'The Book of Sydney Suburbs'
WrittenRev Gregory Jobs The National Trust of Australia (NSW) - Annual Report 2011/12
WrittenRinger, Ron2016Summoned by Bells: a History of St. Jude's Church, Randwick, 1865-2015 View detail
WrittenRinger, Ron2015Summoned by Bells: a History of St. Jude's Church, Randwick, 1865-2015
WrittenS Clarke1980National Trust Classification Card
WrittenSharon Hickey photography St Jude's anglican church Randwick: photographic achival recording of the church hall
WrittenWoodhouse and Danks Pty Ltd1984Historic Report and Conservation Plan for St Jude's Anglican Church Randwick
WrittenYeats, Christine2016Book Review: 'Summoned by Bells: a History of St.Jude's Church, Randwick, 1865-2015' by Ron Ringer View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045455
File number: EF14/5235; S90/3330, HC32066


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