Rosedale Cottage | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Rosedale Cottage

Item details

Name of item: Rosedale Cottage
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Cottage
Location: Lat: -31.7620614292 Long: 150.8357396330
Primary address: Mount Street, Murrurundi, NSW 2338
Parish: Murrurundi
County: Brisbane
Local govt. area: Upper Hunter
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Wanaruah
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT4 DP708542
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Mount StreetMurrurundiUpper HunterMurrurundiBrisbanePrimary Address
Little StreetMurrurundiUpper HunterMurrurundiBrisbaneAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Mrs Emilia Louise ArchibaldPrivate 

Description

Construction years: 1845-1850
Physical description: Land:
740 acres of land granted in 1840 to George Hall.

Garden:
During the Wilson ownership there was a pleasant garden with grapevine trellises at the rear and along the verandah of the eastern wing, a fernery north of the sitting room, a flower garden near the eastern wing and the boys' room, and a vegetable garden near the well. There were fruit trees west of the buildings and an orchard over near Little Street.

One approaches the homestead along the present access road and came through a big gate into the big space in the north western corner of the group of buildings. A picket fence ran from the kitchen being northwards twoards the sheds and a line of trees ran along here (the present row of kurrajongs (Brachychiton populneum). There were no palm trees at that time but the pine tree (likely a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) in the south west corner was there. The river flats south of the house (new parkland) were planted with lucerne at that time and there was apparently no fence near the house on its southern side.

A major subdivision occurred in 1930 reducing the property to 73 acres.

The garden today has mature Canary Island date palm (Phoenix canariensis) close to the house, mature Himalayan cedars (Cedrus deodara), English/European elm (Ulmus procera), Mediterranean chaste bush (Vitex agnus-castis)(Stuart Read, from photographs, 27/1/2017).

Cottage:
The original five roomed cottage was built probably between 1845-50. This section of Rosedale Cottage is brick construction on a sandstone base course. Sandstone quoins have been used at the corners and reveals to openings. Heads, sills and the verandah is sandstone, the latter flagged on a sandstone base course. The roof structure is timber - originally shingled and later covered with corrugated iron. The eaves have a fascia and boxed soffit of boards with a ventilation space. Internal walls are construction of brick, which are plastered and papered. The floors are timber bordeds and ceilings include metal tiles and sheets, lath and plaster, fibrous plaster, and tongue and groove boarding.

1883 - 1935 major changes occurred. The family was large employed several servants and entertained a great deal. 1932 - the family donated the southern part of the property for a park, known as 'Wilson Park' and land for the 'Wilson Memorial Hospital'.

Most of the extensions and renovations appear to have been carried out during this time. The two major additons were of timber-ramed construction on wooden stumps. The first extension (probably in the 1890s) is thought to be the bay window which enlarge the room, apparently used as a sitting room. The dining room was added, togeterh with the middle verandah. The kitchen block was connected to the dining room by a covered way.

The second addition, the eastern wing, was thought to have been built about 1901. The detached timber building just north of the new dining room was built beside the kitchen block and used as a dormitory by the five sons. It was known as the boy's room. Other buildings include meat house near the old dining room fireplace, an office east of the boys' room, a dairy room and a small room known as 'the factory' which was used for making preserves. Further to the north were a hayshed, a shed for two or three buggies, stables, a woolshed, milking bails, poultry shed and associated stockyards.
Modifications and dates: Land:
1840: 740 acres
1930: subdivided and reduced to 30 acres
1932 - the family donated the southern part of the property for a park, known as 'Wilson Park' and land for the 'Wilson Memorial Hospital'.

Cottage:
The original roof was shingled and later covered with corrugated iron.

1883 - 1935 major changes occurred.
Most of the extensions and renovations appear to have been carried out during this time. The two major additons were of timber-ramed construction on wooden stumps. The first extension (probably in the 1890s) is thought to be the bay window which enlarged the room, apparently used as a sitting room. The dining room was added, together with the middle verandah. The kitchen block was connected to the dining room by a covered way.

c1901
The second addition, the eastern wing, was thought to have been built about 1901. The detached timber building just north of the new dining room was built beside the kitchen block and used as a dormitory by the five sons. It was known as the boy's room. Other buildings include meat house near the old dining room fireplace, an office east of the boys' room, a dairy room and a small room known as 'the factory' which was used for making preserves. Further to the north were a hayshed, a shed for two or three buggies, stables, a woolshed, milking bails, poultry shed and associated stockyards.

Parkin family ownership
a new kitchen and entrance was built between the dining room and the bay window room and the earlier kitchen block was demolished. The small bedroom in the old brick part of the house was converted to a bathroom. The eastern wing was converted int a selfcontained flat. The western end of the boys' room was converted into a laundry and a new meathouse was built just north of the boys' room. palm trees were planted during this period. The cellar like enclosure under the east.
Current use: residence
Former use: residence

History

Historical notes: The original five roomed cottage was built probably between 1845-50 on 740 acres of land granted in 1840 to George Hall. This original section of Rosedale Cottage is of brick construction, built up from a sandstone base course. Sandstone quions have been used at the corners and reveals to openings. Heads, sills and thes are also made of sandstone. The verandah is sandstone, flagged on a sandstone base course. The roof structure is timber which was originally shingled and later covered with corrugated iron. The eaves have a fascia and boxed soffit of boards with a ventilation space. Internal walls are construction of brick, which are plastered and papered. The floors are timber bordeds and ceilings include metal tiles and sheets, lath and plaster, fibrous plaster, and tongue and groove boarding.

The property was acquired in 1883 by William Wilson, whose family owned the property until 1935 and it was during this period of occupation the major changes occurred at Rosedale. The family was large and apparently prosperous, employed several servants and entertained a great deal. During the period, the family donated the southern part of the property for a park, (27.8.1932) known as 'Wilson Park' and land for the 'Wilson Memorial Hospital'.

Most of the extensions and renovations appear to have been carried out during this time. The two major additons were of timberframed construction on wooden stumps. The first extension (probably in the 1890s) is thought to be the bay window which enlarge the room, apparently used as a sitting room. The dining room was added, togeterh with the middle verandah. The kitchen block was connected to the dining room by a covered way.

The second addition, the eastern wing, was thought to have been built about 1901. The detached timber building just north of the new dining room was built beside the kitchen block and used as a dormitory by the five sons. It was known as the boy's room. Other buildings include meat house near the old dining room fireplace, an office east of the boys' room, a dairy room and a small room known as 'the factory' which was used for making preserves. Further to the north were a hayshed, a shed for two or three buggies, stables, a woolshed, milking bails, poultry shed and associated stockyards.

During the Wilson ownership there was a pleasant garden with grapevine trellises at the re and along the verandah of the eastern wing, a fernery north of the sitting room, a flower garden near the eastern wing and the boys' room, and a vegetable garden near the well. There were fruit trees west of the buildings and an orchard over near Little Street.

One approaches the homestead along the present access road and came through a big gate into the big space in the north western corner of the group of buildings. A picket fence ran from the kitchen being northwards twoards the sheds and a line of trees ran along here (the present row of kurrajongs). There were no palm trees at that time but the pine tree at the south west corner was there. The river flats south of the house (new parkland) were planted with lucerne at that time and there was apparently no fence near the house on its southern side.

W.A. Wilson died in 1913. After Emelie Wilson's (his wife's) death in 1923, or 1928, the house was occupied by her daughter Muriel until the property was sold in 1935. A major subdivision occurred in 1930 reducing the property to 73 acres. The Parkin family bought the property.

During their ownership a new kitchen and entrance was built between the dining room and the bay window room and the earlier kitchen block was demolished. The small bedroom in the old brick part of the house was converted to a bathroom. The eastern wing was converted int a selfcontained flat. The western end of the boys' room was converted into a laundry and a new meathouse was built just north of the boys' room. Palm trees were planted during this period. The cellar like enclosure under the east

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban and rural interaction-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes demonstrating styles in landscape design-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Park-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Pastoral Homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages community park-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural Estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing private towns-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1788-1850-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0042102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0042101 Aug 86 1263753
Local Environmental Plan  30 Jul 93   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
National Trust Country Register 4006National Trust of Austalia (NSW)  No

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045483
File number: S90/05447 & HC 32767


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