Oldbury Farm | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Oldbury Farm

Item details

Name of item: Oldbury Farm
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.5302196555 Long: 150.3087690260
Primary address: Oldbury Road, Moss Vale, NSW 2577
Parish: Bong Bong
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP559345
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Oldbury RoadMoss ValeWingecarribeeBong BongCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 

Statement of significance:

Oldbury Farm Group is significant as one of the earliest farms in the area and because of the quality and high degree of intactness of the main homestead. The significance of the site is further enhanced by its large and attractively landscaped grounds - which include numerous mature early 19th century trees - and through its association with James and Caroline Louisa Atkinson (LEP, 1990).

Oldbury is significant as an early and stylisticaly rare representative of Colonial Georgian country house (its lack of a verandah making it a reasonable contemporary English Georgian farmhouse). The building's significance is further enhanced by its extensive and attractively landscaped setting with mature 19th century trees, the quality of its original craftsmanship and detailing, its aesthetic integrity and the high degree of intactness of original features and fabric (assisted by careful and appropriate conservation)(LEP, 1990). Oldbury resembles a small English farmhouse, particularly in its setting of English trees which do well in this locality. Its style is unusual in Australia, and it is an interesting example of the good builidng craftsmanship of the time, in what was in 1828 quite a remote area of settlement (National Trust of Australia (NSW), 1981).

(garden) the importance of the garden relies solely on its rare surviving layout - the rare combination of a small, formerly enclosed, "cottage" garden before the house, giving onto an impressively scaled carriage circle.

The use of small enclosed gardens before homesteads appears to have been quite common once but few are now intact, their boundaries having been extended. Few appear to have been raised and as carefully formed as that at Oldbury, or formed in conjunction with a carriage loop.
A similar raised garden but without a carriage loop survives at Meadowvale, Appin. There is no planting of special interest (Survey of Gardens in NSW - National Trust of Australia (NSW), 1981).
Date significance updated: 15 Jun 10
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: James Atkinson (attrib.)
Construction years: 1822-1828
Physical description: Estate/Oldbury Group (curtilage of SHR listing)
80 acres at the foot (north side) of Mount Gingenbullen(unattrib., 1999, 53).

The group consists of:
- the surrounding farming property;
- service yards and outbuildings;
- the garden (WI0164);
- a swimming pool, tennis court and pavilion; and
- the homestead complex and homestead (WI0057).

Rural setting/landscape/outlook:
Set on a rise at the north-western footslopes of Mt. Gingenbullen, situated at the end of Oldbury Road along European hawthorn-hedges (Crataegus oxycantha) and a European elm tree (Ulmus procera)-copse-enclosed roadway (some Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) and some Arizona cypress (C.glabra) also flank Oldbury Road.

Surrounding paddocks are edged with hawthorn hedges, many being progressively re-layed in recent years in the traditional English / European manner, cutting their trunks almost through, laying vertical trunks and branches down horizontally or on an angle, pinning these to vertical stakes and encouraging coppicing shoots from the base, to keep the hedges stock-proof and dense right to the base (Stuart Read, pers.comm.)

Oldbury Creek winds through the property, crossing Oldbury Road which is unsealed. Copses of willow (Salix sp., likley crack willow, S.fragilis) line the creek, along with hawthorn seedlings (from former hedges on the property).


A pleasure garden forms the entry 'court' to the elevated homestead complex, which is set up a large circular drive, with a slip (service) drive below that on the north-eastern side, leading to sheds and yards for the farm complex.

Homestead complex and 'home garden':
The homestead complex is protected by shelter belts of hawthorns, Bhutan cypresses (Cupressus torulosa) and (to its rear/south) closely-shaved hybrid cypresses (x Cuprocyparis leylandii 'Leighton's Green')). Some old and tall Monterey pines (Pinus radiata) remain to the house's southwest which frame the garden and shelter it from westerly winds (thaqt are strong in this area)(Stuart Read, pers.comm., 30/8/13).

The house has two 'wing' blocks, one a traditional separated kitchen block. To the west a further additional pavilion building has been adapted as a family room. Behind the complex are gently terraced gardens with some old fruit trees (apples, crabapples), herbs and flower beds.

A rear paddock rises sharply behind the house, to a flat paved seating area with fine views out over the homestead complex to the valley it surveys. Further hawthorn hedges separate the further rise of hill slope up Mount Gingenbullen (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 6/11/2018).

Drives and Pleasure Garden:
The homestead complex is surrounded by large exotic trees and lawns (ibid, 30/8/13).

From the gates (modern) a short straight section of drive leads into a large circular carriage loop set in expansive lawn.

A level, approximately semi circular area before the house is raised above the carriage drive and approached from it by stone steps from which a straight central stone flagged path leads to the house.

Old illustrations suggest that this garden before the house was formerly hedged and there is evidence of a gate being set at the top of the steps. The eastern side of this terrace has been roughly stone flagged in recent years.

A modern drive branches off the carriage loop near (south-east of) the house to lead to the garages converted from outbuildings to the house's south-east and replacing the older service drive to the east which was separate to the main drive.

The garden is sheltered on the west by a border planting of old and tall Monterey pines (Pinus radiata)(now senescent and all but one since (2013) removed),a Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara) to the house's southwest frame the garden and shelter it from westerly winds (strong in this area)(Stuart Read, pers.comm., 28/8/2013). Some older oaks (Quercus sp.) in front and east of the house and old Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)(2) to the house's rear/south.

Although the terrace and carriage circle appear to be of mid nineteenth century form, it is possible that they are not contemporary (NTA, 1981).

One large old Monterey pine to the east of the house and side drive remains and other younger Monterey pines to the house's east. Otherwise apart from the many old elms on the garden's edges, the road and paddocks, some very old shrubs, such as common lilac (Syringa vulgaris cv.), Cotoneaster sp., fruit trees such as plum (Prunus domestica cv.), apple (Malus sylvestris cv.) at the rear, there is little more old planting.

A range of modern planting has been added since the 1990s including an extent of Leyland cypress (x Cuprocyparis leylandii 'Leighton's Green') hedging to the house's rear, compartmentalising the rear garden and 'home paddock'.

To the house's south-west are a formal (and cypress-hedged/screened) vegetable garden area and beyond that, a line of Monterey cypress and another of Leyland cypresses have been added to on the east by another of sweet gums (Liquidambar styraciflua). The space between the two cypress rows has been converted into a 'native walk' or garden, with topiary shaping of native species, since April 2013. It is intended to extend this up the slope of Mount Gingenbullen through native corridors in the farm's paddocks.

In particular since c.2013 a programme of rejuvenation of the garden and farm has been underway. Old flagged paths have been relaid in sandstone. Adjoining areas of farm paddock have been incorporated into the garden as 'nature garden', magnolia walk, prairie garden and arboretum (tree collection). The aim is to surround the historic core with parkland lawns and extend towards Oldbury Cottage garden, without disturbing the historic character of Oldbury. Landscape designers Chris and Charlotte Webb have more recently been advising on design and plant selection to the two gardeners on site (Oldbury Farm, 2014).

Under the elms at the front gate and drive thousands of European bluebells (Endymion non-scriptus) have been planted for their blue spring flowers. Benches and a small bridge over the new stream or prairie garden have been added. The latter is planted with perennials and decorative grasses in 2013. This creek flows when there is enough rain to overflow the large farm dam above (south-east of the house).

Tennis Court:
with stone pavilion (unattrib., 1999, 53), set back behind mature European elm trees to the east of the homestead group and slightly uphill, serviced by both drives which converge infront of sheds, a petrol pump and general turn-around area. The court is fenced with shade-cloth clad high fencing.

Swimming Pool:
glass-tiled, heated and situated to the south-east of the homestead complex, screened by tightly clipped hybrid cypress hedges (ibid, 1999, 53). An adapted farm building serves as change rooms and facilities.

Arboretum (NB: outside the SHR curtilage to the east and uphill, adjoining Oldbury Road and one farm dam):
To the northeast of the dam and house garden a new 5 acre arboretum with a loop walk has been created since 2013, in converted farm paddocks. A pinetum (collection of pine species), native garden, firepit and lookout on the top of the spur to the north-east have been added. At the top end of the loop walk is a new hedge of hawthorn, as part of an ongoing program of farm hawthorn hedge relaying and replanting. At the bottom near the dam is a very old hedge relayed in 2012..

On the western side of the house, broadleaf trees have been planted. On the east side, the Chinese pistachio (Pistacia chinensis) and golden elm (Ulmus x hollandica 'Lutescens'). Hybrid plane trees (Platanus x hybrida) flank the side drive to the house's east.

One old white camellia is in Oldbury's garden, a Camellia japonica 'Planipetala', (Italy, 1951), "the most amazing find". The incurved petal arrangement gives an important clue (there is nothing else in that period to match it - we also have matching 19th century prints. Oldbury's head gardener informed me that it was an old camellia that had been heavily chopped back. I will contact the school about this. Camellia Ark would have a particular interest in this plant (Dr Stephen Utick, Secretary, Camellia Ark Australia, email 3/11/2018).

Oldbury Cottage: (NB: outside SHR curtilage)
To Oldbury Farm's south-east and slightly uphill on Oldbury Road to the east (outside the SHR curtilage) is Oldbury Cottage, a (at times) separately-held property on Oldbury Road, historically part of the broader Oldbury Farm estate. This comprises a very early colonial stone cottage, pavilion extension and outbuildings, with garden and surrounded by protective Monterey pines and hawthorn hedging.

Homestead complex:
The homestead itself is approached by a single gravel drive, with a large carriage loop directly in front of the house. The drive divides and a rear drive winds around the eastern side of house and garden to a range of outbuildings and service yards and the rear garden and paddocks.

Homestead:
Oldbury is a simple, two-storey, Colonial, Georgian house which retains its original joinery. The roof has a single pitch with a longer slope at the rear, covering rooms in which the floor level is lower than those in front of the house.

The house has eight rooms, a hall, passages, offices and cellar beneath. It is built of stone, with a (non original) timber shingle roof and has a simple, Doric, timber portico.
The house has four living rooms, five bedrooms and four cellar rooms (unattrib., 1999, 53).

It has small paned casement windows and six panelled doors set in panelled jambs with elaborate architraves. The entrance door is a wide pair of French windows with Georgian glazing. The wide entrance hall with a timber, cantilevered stair, beneath which a door with a semi-circular fanlight leads to the rear of the house, is particularly fine. In the living room, to the left of the hall on entering, is a cedar fireplace of unusual design and good craftsmanship. The cellars are formed by the deep foundations and paved with brick and stone. Its ceilings are lined with lathe and plaster. The house is in good condition (LEP, 1990).

Kitchen and Dairy:
At each end of the stone flagged verandah at the rear of the house there ia a seperate stone building - one previously a kitchen, and the other one a dairy.

Study/Retreat (possible former Stables):
In the grounds (west of the homestead complex on the same level as its rear) are a Study/Retreat, adaptively reused - possibly a former stables (unattrib., 1999, 53).
Date condition updated:28 Apr 14
Modifications and dates: 1920s the roof was altered in form and materials. Present shingle roof replaces an earlier corrugated iron roof (shown in 1964 National Trust Listing Proposal); timber shutters are also new (post 1964).

1983 - total restoration by Clive Lucas & Partners, including putting the roof back to its original form (had been altered in the 1920s), reshingling the roof, reconstructing the front portico and front steps - all work based on measured drawings/drawings by William Hardy Wilson in the 1910s/20s.

6-8/2012: the hawthorn hedges on Oldbury farm have been re-layed in the traditional method - cutting stems/trunks, 'laying' these on an angle, staking and pinning them to make them dense and stock-proof at ground/stock level.
Further information: 1981: Until recent times however, there was little respect for the concept of design. Modern planting has been random and unsatisfactory but insufficient to destroy the integrity of the original design. Restoration is in progress (Survey of Gardens in NSW - National Trust of Australia (NSW), 1981).

c2011/12 - On the west of the front door an old black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) flanked the flight of steps leading to the front door and overhung the house. (possibly the remnant of shrubberies either side of the steps which also show in a nineteenth century illustration). It recently suffered storm damage and was removed.

c2012/13 - a large golden Monterey cypress at its centre (20th century planting - was removed, opening up the carriage drive view in and out again.
Current use: rural residence and estate
Former use: Aboriginal land, colonial farm estate, rural residence

History

Historical notes: Oldbury (farm) was established in 1822 by James Atkinson (LEP, 1990)(1794-1834) on 3000 acres of land granted by Governor Macquarie (AHC).

James Atkinson was born in 1794 in Oldbury, Kent and was a farmer. He arrived in NSW in1820 as a free settler on the "Saracen". The land that would become Oldbury was granted by Macquarie, initially 800 acres in 1818 ((Oldbury Farm, 2014; Maguire, 2002, 34) says the original grant was to Atkinson, by Macquarie, in 1821).

In 1825 Atkinson returned to England and wrote "An Account of the State of Agriculture and Grazing in New South Wales".
Magure (2002) adds that Atkinson published several papers on Agricultural matters between 1826 and 1829 - the best known of which is the one cited above, which was favourably reviewed by English author and polymath publisher, John Claudius Loudon.

Returning to Australia in 1826 he married the governess of Hannibal Macarthur's children, Charlotte Waring and applied to the Colonial Secretary for more land (1200 acres), which he received, and then proceeded to build Oldbury in 1828. He built the first windmill and evidently started milling flour on his property as well as dairy farming. He was a progressive man and encouraged activities such as ploughing matches. At Oldbury he created a model farm which won widespread admiration (Oldbury Farm, 2014).

James Atkinson died in 1834, "a gentleman of considerable literary attainments and as a practical agriculturist second to none in the colony" wrote the Sydney Gazette.

His wife Charlotte wrote the first published childrens' book in Australia: 'A Mother's offering to her children'.

His youngest daughter Caroline Louisa (1834-1872) was born just 8 weeks before James died. Always delicate, she spent her youth writing and collecting and drawing animals and botanical specimens near her home(s) - first at Oldbury and later at Kurrajong (Fernhurst) in the Blue Mountains and on the South Coast of NSW. A keen horse rider, she would set out on horseback to gain access to deep gullies and high ridges. At 23 she published her first novel, 'Gertrude the Immigrant: a Tale of Colonial Life' which was to be followed by five more (some were serialised in the 'Sydney Mail' (1861-72) and regular columns in the 'Sydney News' (1853-55), 'Sydney Morning Herald' and 'SYDNEY MAIL' (1860-71), where her columns entitled 'A Voice from the Country' were often accompanied by her own sketches. It was as a botanist however that her contributions were most valuable. She corresponded with the leading botanists of the day, including (making collections of botanical specimens for) The Rev. William Woolls (of Parramatta) and Baron von Mueller (Govt. Botanist of Victoria, Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne), who named a species of mistletoe, Nuytsia (syn.Atkinsonia ligustrina) after her. Xanthosia atkinsoniana, Erechtites atkinsoniae (now Senecio bipinnatisectus) and the heath Epacris calvertiana also carry her name(s)(Maguire, 2002, 34-35).

Atkinson was as well as a botanist, a naturalist, artist and author of many books on native flora and fauna ... and of many authoritative publications on Australian fauna)(Oldbury Farm, 2014).

Louisa, her sisters and brother spent their earliest years in this house, garden, farm and surrounds. She became one of Australia's earliest botanical explorers. The first Australian native-born woman novelist (as Morris Miller's 'Australian Literature' attests), Louisa was one of the earliest women journalists. She was also an artist of technical ability and great verve of expression (Crittendon, 1996, 18-19).

In 1869 Louisa married explorer and naturalist James Calvert (1825-84) who had accompanied Ludwig Leichhardt on his 1844-45 expedition. Always interested in horticulture, he won a medal at the London International Exhibition (1862) for his entry on the possible commercial cultivation of native flax (Maguire, 2002, 35).

Her regular popular natural history columns in the 'Sydney Morning Herald' were re-published by Victor Crittenden in two volumes through his Mulini Press in 1978 as 'A Voice from the Country' (the pseudonym Atkinson used for the articles - it was not common for authors to sign their work in those days) and as 'Excursions from Berrima and a Trip to Manaro and Molonglo in the 1870s', which was articles about her travels and botanical searches on the Southern Tablelands of NSW (Crittendon, 1996, 18-19).

Louisa's first novels originally appeared as serials in the 'Sydney Mail' and only her first two novels, 'Gertrude the Emigrant' and 'Cowanda, the Veteran's Grant' were published as books in her lifetime. 'Myra', 'The Debatable Ground' and 'Tom Hellicar's Children' were re-published by Mulini Press and they give a wonderful view of Australian country life. 'Tom Hellicar's Children' paints a picture of childhood in the Berrima district and recalled her own memories of life at Oldbury. The novel recounts the cruel treatment of three children by their guardian uncle. They are dispossessed of their idealistic home as Louisa was when her father died and the whole family fled from their brutal alcoholic stepfather (Crittendon, 1996, 18-19).

Louise Lawson's book 'The Distant Sound of Native Voices' focused on Atkinson's writings on Aboriginals - some of Louisa's earliest published illustrations were of Aboriginal remains near Oldbury. Lawson's 1995 book 'The Natural Art of Louisa Atkinson' (State Library of NSW Press) presented Louisa's writings and artwork. Louisa was trained in art by her mother Charlotte, who had in turn received lessons from John Glover. Louisa prepared a book of her own artwork for publication, which has never been traced. It was to include the botanical and flower paintings, birds and animals of NSW. Ferdinand von Muller, with whom she had corresponded on botany over the years, had sent the book to Germany to have the illustrations engraved by experts. The book was never published as she died while it was in preparation and it disappeared. It may have been burnt in the great bonfires at Oldbury when the house was sold some years after her death. She died tragically in 1872 (Crittenden, 1996, 18-19). She died tragically just 18 days after giving birth to her only child, a daughter, Louise Snowden Calvert (Maguire, 2000, 35).

The avenue of English (European) elms was planted by Atkinson, his idea being to continue them to Mereworth, as a link to his brother John's property, Mereworth (LEP, 1990). John's property, Mereworth is situated on the western side of the (present) Hume Highway from Oldbury and the two were connected by an unsealed road (now bissected by the realigned Hume Highway)(Stuart Read, pers.comm., 8/6/2010).

In 1999 Americans Ed and Dianne O'Neal and son Edward became the now-60 acre Oldbury's owners and inhabitants. Ed runs Australia's fifth largest bank, St. George and Dianne is involved with restoring their American historic homes and Oldbury, along with their Sydney residence, Atherfield. The O'Neals are furnishing Oldbury with some English antiques and with Australian furniture of the period. (unattrib., 1999, 51).

A program in recent years of rejuvenation, replanting and revival of layed hawthorn hedges on the farm has been implemented. Hedge laying is an old European practice which produces stock-proof farm hedges. A similar program of rejuvenation of the garden has been underway in recent years (Oldbury Farm, 2014). English (Shropshire) master hedge-layer Mark Fowles was brought out to nearby Sutton Forest estate Whitley (Nottle, 1985, 80) and re-laid its hawthorn hedges for Whitley's then owner John Hawkins in 1983 and 1986 and trained Geoff Mc Donald (from Oldbury estate) in the craft. John Hawkins moved to Tasmania, and (it is assumed that in the interim, Mark Knowles had died), Hawkins brought out Karl Liebscher (who knew Mark Knowles) from England to lay the hedges at 'Bentleigh', Chudleigh, Tasmania (and Liebscher may have trained James Boxall in hedge laying. In the 2000s David Newby got the contact for Karl from John Hawkins and had him come to Oldbury (from England) to do more hedge-laying and renovating. Karl trained Ian Carroll (Oldbury gardener) in hedge-laying. In c.2016 James Boxall took over renovating and laying the estate hedges at Oldbury in conjunction with Ian Carroll (Chris Webb, pers.comm., 21/6/2018).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. River flats-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Conserving and protecting natural features-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Marking the transition from pastoralism to agriculture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new crops and methods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of scenic beauty-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes demonstrating styles in landscape design-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of food production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing rural amenity or character-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use pastoral homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating convicts-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing working animals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to tourist-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on pastoral stations-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Atkinson, gentleman farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Louisa Atkinson, author artist and botanist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Charlotte Atkinson (nee Waring), Macarthur family governess, children's book author, farmer-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementCarry out an Archaeological Assessment 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act General garden and farm maintenance


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls and and tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
(3) Horticultural and agricultural management, including pasture improvement and stock grazing (in areas outside the garden enclosure) and the eradication of noxious plants and animals.
(4) Maintenance and repair of existing farm fences, dams, water storage facilities, water reticulation systems and access roads.
Nov 7 1986
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0048802 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0048807 Nov 86 1755473
Regional Environmental PlanIllawarra REP 01 Jan 96   
Local Environmental Plan  12 Jan 90   
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Wingecarribee Heritage Survey1991 JRC Planning Services  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCrittendon, Victor1996‘Louisa Atkinson as Dianella – Louisa Atkinson’s Art, Botany and Writings’, in Australian Garden History, vol.7 no. 6, May/June 1996, 18-19
WrittenMaguire, Moira2002'Atkinson, (Caroline) Louisa Waring (1834-72) entry
WrittenNational Trust of Australia (NSW) (James Broadbent for)1981Survey of Gardens in NSW
WrittenNottle, Trevor1985'Some gardening skills we are in danger of losing'
WrittenOldbury Farm (unattributed)2014Oldbury Farm
Writtenunattributed (David & Jane Newby)2016Oldbury Farm
Writtenunattributed text; Petrie, Tom (photos)1999'An American at Oldbury'
WrittenUtick, Dr. Stephen, Secretary, Camellia Ark Australia, email 3/11/20182018personal communication

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The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045492
File number: S90/03617 & KHC 860994


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