Whitley, outbuildings, entry gate, garden | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Whitley, outbuildings, entry gate, garden

Item details

Name of item: Whitley, outbuildings, entry gate, garden
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -34.5452641359 Long: 150.3339655180
Primary address: 217 Oldbury Road, Sutton Forest, NSW 2577
Parish: Bong Bong
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT2 DP123550
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
217 Oldbury RoadSutton ForestWingecarribeeBong BongCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 

Statement of significance:

Whitley is significant as it illustrates the historical development of the Sutton Forest and wider Southern Highlands area as the choice location for wealthy and socially prominent families to build their country retreats in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. As an example of Tudor Revival architecture within an Australian context, it demonstrates the overwhelming influence of British 'English Countryside' architecture within Australia especially until the turn of the 20th century. By way of their ownership of the residence, it is associated with prominent people such as the Hon. Judge William Owen (NSW High Court); Thomas William Heney, first Australian born editor of the Sydney Morning Herald, and Edward Dryland Hordern of the prominent Hordern family of retailers.

Whitley is also significant in that it exemplifies the Tudor Revival architectural style as it was applied in Australia in the late 19th century to a residence constructed for the Hon. Judge Owens as a gentleman's retreat in the Southern Highlands south of Sydney. It has certain key elements of this style such as the half timbering on the upper level of the house. It has landmark qualities due to its position on Mount Gingenbullen and its outstanding garden setting fashioned on the English pleasure ground model including hedges, trees, forest, lily pond, summer house and a commanding view of the surrounding countryside.

Whitley contributes to the identity of the Southern Highlands as an area characterised by grand residences situated on large estates that are still favoured by the wealthy and /or socially prominent as country summer or weekend retreats.

Although it forms part of a group of large highland country retreats, Whitley's Tudor Revival architectural style is distinctive in the area and therefore may contain evidence that is relevant to further understanding the area's cultural history.

Whitley is a good example of the group of large country houses within the Southern Highlands region that were built as gentlemen's residences in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but is rare in that it is the only example among this group that was constructed in the Tudor Revival style (Rappoport, 2003, 31).

The Whitley Group is significant within the local area and region as a substantial and picturesquely located property, representative of the important group of large country residences built in the 1880s and 90s by prominent Sydney families which established the social character of the Bowral-Moss Vale- Sutton Forest area and contributed to the development of the area as a place for rural retreats. The property as a whole with its mature tree plantings and hedges is also significant because of its aesthetic qualities which contribute to the character of the distinctive rural landscape of the Mt Gingenbullen slopes.
Date significance updated: 03 Jun 16
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: Thomas Clayden of Sydney
Construction years: 1887-1892
Physical description: Grounds/garden:
The property sits in an imposing situation on the eastern side of Mt. Gingenbullen (LEP, 2010) with expansive views east and south. The property as a whole with its mature tree plantings and hedges is significant because of its aesthetic qualities which contribute to the character of the distinctive rural landscape of Mt Gingenbullen slopes (ibid, 2010) and of the Sutton Forest district (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 14/2/2018).

Whitley has a mature garden setting (ibid, 2010). The Fergusons note that its mature trees are some of its great assets, with its planes, pines, oaks, pin oaks, elms and conifers nearing a century old, and were the star attraction of the garden they inherited (McIntosh, 2007).

Whitley is a largely reconstructed garden comprising significant mature tree plantings, a teardrop circle quartz drive and original re-(traditionally) layed hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha) hedge rows (ibid, 2010, botanical name added by Stuart Read).

The entrance gates to the main drive comprise large squat face brick piers with rendered ball mouldings flanked by semi-circular dwarf walls ending in rendered ball mouldings. The present modern steel gates replace earlier timber gates (ibid, 2010).

The central drive forms an ovoid turning circle before (north of) the house. It has a mature full grown hybrid plane tree (Platanus x acerifolia) as a focal specimen at the entry with the drive lined by mature cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) hedges (ibid, 2010) which line Oldbury Road. Three mature oaks (Quercus sp.) are close to the road (Stuart Read, ibid).

Significant elements within the garden that define the character of Whitely and are integrated into the site's sloping undulations include a lower terrace below the house, a stone retaining wall with formal rose plantings and rose arbor. The western side of the residence has a gazebo and water feature contained within a depression that is on axis with an obelisk in the nut orchard found on the southern boundary. Edge details include a pine (Pinus sp.) planting on the rear boundary and the use of box (Buxus sempervirens) hedges around the residence. The front boundary has a mature oak (Quercus sp.)(ibid, 2010, botanical names added by Stuart Read).

The garden's other aspects include the use of statues and small built elements. The planting pattern is a feature. As you enter the gates, the bright green hedge is Leyland cypress (x Cuprocyparis leylandii 'Leighton's Green'). Most other hedges are hawthorn. On the circular front lawn is a beech (Fagus sylvatica) hedge and a standard weeping elm (Ulmus scabra 'Pendula'). A hybrid plane tree (Platanus x hybrida) is on the circular lawn.

There is a formal rose garden with a Haddonstone centre piece and bordered by Japanese yew (Cephalothaxus harringtoniana). Nearby a grove of silver birch (Betula pendula) underplanted with blue bells. Crab-apples (Malus sp./cv.s) form a walk from the tennis-court. A large sloping flower bed below the terrace is cleverly planted with paeonies (Paeonia suffruticosa cv.s), viburnums, rhododendrons, and purple smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria 'Purpurea'. Rugosa roses (Rosa rugosa cv.s) form a bank below the terrace, below is 'Nevada', others are 'Alba' and 'L'Hay'. 'Guinea' (a dark red rose) grows on the main pergola. Near the pond are two willow-leafed pear trees (Pyrus salicifolia 'Pendula') and behind the temple at the back of the pool is a semicircle of maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba). Many fine old trees are growing on the hill above the house - Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa), English elms (Ulmus procera), Himalayan cedars (Cedrus deodara) and some olives Olea europaea var. europaea cv.)(LEP, 2010, botanical names added by Stuart Read).

The garden of Whitley...has been immaculately reconstructed, but bears no resemblance to the garden first created there (Cavanough et al, 1988, 75, botanical names added by Stuart Read). The garden is open, by invitation, to horticulture and garden history groups (LEP, 2010).

2007+: the Fergusons have planted flowers to animate the 'low maintenance, architectural green garden', painted the house's decorative timbers soft grey (cf the existing terracotta), added an enclosed 'Secret Vegetable Garden', a new formal rose garden called the 'Fan Garden' becuase of its shape, an orchard and a nut orchard, a crab-apple walk, a pink garden, a fountain garden, a cottage garden and a shade garden. The Australian part (of the grounds) on the south side of the hill is a 'man-made woodland of natives' (McIntosh, 2007).

Buildings:
The group consists of:
- the main house, outbuildings and main entrance gates (2680055) and
- the garden (2680361)

Other items include:
- a modern brick and timber garage/stables building
- coach house and other outbuildings (LEP, 2010).

House:
Large two storey Tudor-revival style house. Face brickwork to ground floor level in the manner of Victorian Elizabethan/Tudor Revival. The steeply pitched, multi gabled roof is clad with imported French Marseilles tiles. The label on the back of the original roof
tiles is: "Antoine Sacoman usine la plata Marseille St Henri..."

"The numerous externally featured chimneys are finished with "rough cast" render. A picturesque, timber framed, gabled porch shelters the main entrance. On the northeast elevation is a larger flat roofed "verandah" featuring squat Tuscan style columns supported on a brick balustrade wall. Windows to the main elevations are timber framed casements and 2 x 2 pane double hung sashes. Internally the major feature is an elaborate timber stair of 4 flights (which return on itself)(ibid, 2010).

Massive Australian hardwood staircase, library formal dining room, drawing room, conservatory and slate-floored kitchen. The kitchen, designed by Robyn Hawkins, was constructed at Sturt Workshops at Mittagong, of Queensland ash and New Guinea rosewood. The houe has six bedrooms, four bathrooms and two en-suites (Goldie, 1999, 56).

Outbuildings:
General purpose Outbuildings:
The adjacent outbuildings - including a brickwork (former Groomsman's) cottage, general purpose outbuildings and coach house - are all of face brickwork with rendered and half timbered components and steeply pitched gabled roofs matching the main house (LEP, 2010).
A coachhouse/stables complex is located well away from the house and screened by mature hawthorn hedges and other planting.

Groomsman's Cottage (former):
Face brickwork (LEP, 2010).

Garage/Stables:
Face brickwork. A recent addition - an "L" shaped garage/stables building in face brickwork with terracotta tiled roof (a shallow gable) - links the various outbuildings (LEP, 2010).

Coach house:
Face brickwork with rendered and half timbered components and steeply pitched gabled roofs (LEP, 2010).

Entrance Gates:
The entrance gates to the main drive comprise large squat face brick piers with rendered ball mouldings flanked by semi-circular dwarf walls ending in rendered ball mouldings. The present modern steel gates have replaced earlier timber gates (LEP, 2010).

On the other (east) side of Oldbury Road is the original Old Dairy and Chippendale which were purchased by John Hawkins to put the estate back to the original subdivision size of 1886 (Goldie, 1999, 56). 70 acre estate (real estate advert, same issue).
Date condition updated:14 Feb 18
Modifications and dates: Several alterations have been made to the house over the years, including construction and later enclosure in timber shingling (c1980s) of wing extensions to its east and west. One of these wings has since been further altered to allow an extension.

Early photographs of the house show the half-timbering was only on the entrance (north) facade. This has been extended around the house. A skillion roof verandah has been removed from the east side and most lower windows and the stair hall appear to have been altered. The southwestern frontage has been enclosed (with groups of windows and timber shingle cladding). Renovation/refurbishment work is currently in progress (LEP, 2010).

1999: 10 hectare holding, The Dairy, sold off;
2002: Whitley estate sold with 15 hectares (by then owners, the Hawkins, to Rob & Jenny Ferguson);
7/2006: 10 hectare holding, The Dairy, re-acquired by owners of Whitley (SMH, 2006)

2007+: the Fergusons have planted flowers to animate the 'low maintenance, architectural green garden', painted the house's decorative timbers soft grey (cf the existing terracotta), added an enclosed 'Secret Vegetable Garden', a new formal rose garden called the 'Fan Garden' becuase of its shape, an orchard and a nut orchard, a crab-apple walk, a pink garden, a fountain garden, a cottage garden and a shade garden (McIntosh, 2007).
Current use: residence
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, country residence

History

Historical notes: The first expedition to the area (Sutton Forest) by Europeans took place in 1798 by a party of convicts, soldiers and servants. Ex-convict John Wilson led the party, which was sent by Governor Macquarie reportedly to refute the story among the convicts that China was no more than 150 miles to the south. A second expedition was dispatched the same year in search of salt. A member of one of these expeditions reported from Mount Gingenbullen: 'We got to the top of the hill, where we had a most delightful prospect of the country and in my opinion one of the finest in the world, it certainly must be pleasing to any many to view so fine a country (Cavanough et al, 1988, 21).

By 1815, evidence suggests there were cattle belonging to Surveyor-General Lt. Oxley and William Moore grazing in the district. c.1819, Macquarie granted 1000 acres of land at Moss Vale to Dr Charles Throsby, a surgeon from Leicester, England, who had undertaken exploration in the district and surveyed a new road through the area over the Mittagong Range. This was completed by 1820 and named Argyle Road (Rappoport, 1994, 4, citing Partidge & Davies, 1989). Thosby named his estate 'Throsby Park'. In 1820 Macquarie visited the area southwest of Moss Vale with Commissioner Bigge and named it Sutton Forest after the Speaker of the British House of Commons, Charles Manners Sutton. Macquarie described the locality as 'particularly beautiful and rich - resembling a fine pleasure ground in England' (ibid, 1994, 4). He chose a site for a new town, which was to be called Bong Bong, and a Police Station and Inn called The Argyle were constructed there. However the village was never properly established on the site due to its unreliable water supply and a difficult road traverse (ibid, 2003, 4).

Further grants were made to settlers from the 1820s onwards. On 9 July 1822 James Atkinson received a grant of 800 acres, later extended to 2000 acres. Atkinson was born in Kent, England in 1795 and arrived in Sydney in 1820. From 1820-22 he was a principal clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office. After receiving his grant he named his estate 'Oldbury' and commenced farming and flour milling. He was a progressive farmer who attempted to raise the efficiency of farming in NSW and upon returning to England for a time, wrote two books: 'An Account of the State of Agriculture & Grazing in NSW' (1826) and 'On the Expediency and Necessity of Encouraging Distilling and Brewing from Grain in NSW' (1829) (ibid, 2003, 4).

By the mid-19th century, Sutton Forest area was known as a successful farming region and considered one of the premium wheat-growing districts in the colony: 'Barley, maize, peas, potatoes and turnips were being grown in the 1830s, while beef and dairy cattle, and to a lesser extent sheep grazed the pastures' (Cavanough et al, 1988, 24). In 1863, Surveyor-General RJ Campbell visited the district and noted it was: 'a very prosperous and progressive farming district, entirely in the hands of private individuals, chief estates being Nine Lodge, Mt. Broughton, Newbury and Oldbury, allotments formerly given to veterans now in the hands of an industrious class of settlers' (ibid, 2003, 4-5, quoting Patridge & Davies, 1989).

James Atkinson died at Oldbury on 30/4/1834. His daughter Louisa Atkinson, born the same year, was considered Australia's earliest first-native-born feamel author when she published her first novel 'Gertrude, the Emigrant: a tale of Colonial Life', in 1857, at age 23. It recounts the difficult colonial life in Sutton Forest, the Shoalhaven and Sydney in the late 1830s and 1840s. She was also a noted botanical illustrator and natural history author and wrote a series of essays in the early 1860s called 'A Voice from the Country', in which she described the flora and fauna of the area at different times of the year (ibid, 1988, 24). Louisa died in 1872 at age 38 (ibid, 2003, 5).

After Dr Charles Throsby's death in 1828, his nephew Charles inherited Throsby Park Estate at Moss Vale and built a large home there in 1837. After his death, the main house was leased c1868 to the Governor of NSW, the Earl of Belmore, as a summer residence. Later it was leased by James Reading Fairfax, owner of the Sydney Morning Herald. In 1882, the NSW Government purchased the nearby residence 'Hillview', Sutton Forest, built by Richard Richardson of Richardson & Wrench (real estate agents) c1879, as a permanent summer retreat for the NSW Governor, who at the time was Lord Augustus Loftus. That residence was subsequently extensively renovated. The selection and transformation of Hillview as the Governor's summer residence facilitated a change in the nature of the district form one characterised by farms to one peppered with country retreats. The 1880s saw extensive subdivision of the early land grants. Auction posters for the subdivision of area estates advertised the presence nearby of 'His Excellency Lord Loftus' (Mt. Broughton Estate subdivision, 1882; Newbury's 1880s subdivision poster (opposite Hillview) described it as 'resembling a fine pleasure ground in England' (Patridge & Davies, 1989, in ibid, 1994, 6), forseeing its later attraction to wealthy immigrants and tourists who were keen to escape the harsh summer and recreate an English country life in Australia (ibid, 2003, 6).

Oldbury estate subdivision and Whitley:
In 1887, Atkinson's Oldbury Estate was subdivided and Oldbury Road was created around Mount Gingenbullen('s east and south). The auction took place on 26/11/1887 through Richardson & Wrench auctioneers at Hanrahan's Hotel, Moss Vale (ibid, 2003, 6).

A number of large country homes were built, including Summerlees (1885), Whitley (1889+) and Highfield (on Oldbury Road uphill from (north of) Whitely (1901) by Sydney business leaders. The final building boom was created by the leasing of Throsby Park in 1865 to the then Governor of NSW, Lord Belmore, as his summer residence away from the heat and humidity of Sydney (Goldie, 1999, 56).

What became Whitley was lots 42, 43, 44 and part of lots 36 and 37 of the subdivided Oldbury Estate (portion 17 of the Parish of Bong Bong in the Shire of Wingecarribee, County of Camdne). The earliest certificate of title is dated 17/6/1893 and records the owner as The Hon. Sir William Owen, of Hunters HIll, Primary Judge of the NSW Supreme Court. Two days later on 19/6/1893 the certificate records a mortgage from Owen to Thomas Claydon of Sydney, butcher, dated 6/6/1893. From this it appears that Thomas Claydon previously owned the land and mortgaged it to Owen. It is unclear when Claydon bought the property after the 1887 subdivision, but some documents record Clayton as having constructed the property (sic: house) between 1887 and 1892 for a cost of at least 2900 pounds and that it was probably a 'pattern book' house (Wingecarribee Heritaeg Survey 1991, W1055)(ibid, 2003, 8).

After Owen's purchase of the property in 1893 - and ostensibly the constructed houe - it was named 'Whitley', apparently after the town of Whitley in Shropshire, England, where the Owen family property, 'Ellesmere' was situated (WHS, 1991, W1055). ibid, 1994, 8). Owen was born in Ireland on 4/11/1834, practicing law there and marrying Elizabeth Charlotte Carey in 1860 and migrating to Sydney that year. On 7/9/1860 he was admitted to the NSW Bar and in 1887 appointed to the Supreme Court Bench as Chief Judge in Equity. The Owen family's primary residence was 'Ellesmere' at Hunters Hill, Sydney (ibid, 2003, 8).

Whitley was used as a country retreat for the Owen family. It was built on the slope of what became known as Judge's Hill, in the Tudor Revival style (Cavnough et al, 1988, 82-3).

In 1889 Whitley was subdivided and Oldbury Road was formed around Mount Gingenbullen (prior to this Oldbury was reached along Golden Vale Road and Atkinson's Lane from Sutton Forest)(Cavanough et al, 1988, 82-3).

The Owens were responsible for the garden's early planting (e.g. oaks and elms visible in 1896 photos), and, having come from Shropshire in England, the Owens probably planted the estate's hawthorn hedges (LEP, 2010).

In 1899 the mortgage to Claydon was discharged, and the certificate of title records a mortgage dated 7/6/1899 from Sir William Owen to Mary Louisa Owen, first wife of his son, Langer. Langer Owen was born in Redfern, Sydney in 1862 and was a founder and council member of the Bar Association of NSW. In 1922 he, like his father, was made a permanent Judge of the NSW Supreme Court. Sir William Owen died on 22/11/1912 and on 6/1/1913 the mortgage to Mary Owen was discharged. The title documents then record an application by transmission to record Langer Owen of Sydney, KC, as registered proprietor of the land. On 20/3/1915, when they were heavily involved in the war effort (Mary was a vice-president of the foundation committee of the NSW division of the British Red Cross and Langer organised and directed the Red Cross Information Bureau until 1919), the Owens sold Whitley to Amy Florence Heney. No mortgage was recorded (ibid, 2003, 8).

Amy was the wife of Thomas William Heney. He was born in 1862 in Sydney, educated in Cooma where his father was a proprietor of the 'Monaro Mercury'. After his father died of alcoholism in 1875, Thomas was forced to work to support his mother and began his career as a junior assistant reader with the Sydney Morning Herald in 1878. He became a reporter for the 'Telegraph' and went on to edit and contribute to various publications before rejoining the Herald in 1893 as a reviewer, essayist and reporter. In 1898 he married Amy Florence Gullett and in 1903 was appointed (the first-Australian-born) editor of the Sydney Morning Herald. Like the Owens, Heney was highly involved in the war efforst and his editorials in that peirod urged the home office to direct income taxation for war finance and Australians to be enthusiastic on the home front. He also wrote some verse and novels, published in the late 1800s. He was involved with Sydney's literary scene and is reported to have cultivated the garden at Whitley with a variety of native plants (Nairn, Serle, (eds), 2002, vol.9, 259, quoted in ibid, 2003, 8, 10). A 1913 photograph of Whitley shows the eastern elevation's verandah, overlooking the tennis court (both no longer there)(ibid, 1988).

Heney was a strong supporter of the arts (Goldie, 1999, 56), befriending many young artists, including Ellis Rowan and Elioth Gruner. Gruner came to live at Whitley as a friend of the family. Heney also collected Australian semi-precious stones (ibid, 2010). The Heneys were also responsible for some of Whitley's early planting (ibid, 1988, 50, 83). Heney was a keen gardener and planted a variety of native plants - most have since vanished (Goldie, 1999, 56).

The Heneys only owned Whitley for four years before transferring it to Ethel Amy Campbell on 3/2/1919. (Thomas Heney died in Springwood in 1928, survived by his widow, two daughters and a son). Campbell, who mortgated the house to Amy Heney on the day of the transfer (3/2/1919), is recorded as being a widow, of Edgecliff, Sydney (ibid, 2003, 10).

On 1/3/1920, Ethel Campbell transferred the property to Catherine Watson, wife of Harry Frederick Watson, grazier, of 'Walwa' on the Upper Murray (River). On 4/3/1920, the mortgage to Amy Heney was discharged. The Watsons were a prominent pastoral family form the Upper Murray at the foot of the Snowy Mountains, where they owned Walwa and 'Tintildra' stations and were founding residents of the town of Tintildra. They also established stations at Burketown in Far North Queensland in c1876 (ibid, 2003, 10).

The Watsons owned Whitley for the next 17 years until 5/2/1937 when title documents record a transmission application to register its new owner as the Perpetual Trustee Company (Ltd.). The same day a caveat was placed on the property, which remained until 4/5/1939 when it was withdrawn. On 28/3/1939 the PTC transferred it to Sadie Margaret Maxwell, recorded as wife of The Hon. ALan Victor Maxwell of Sydney, Judge of the Supreme Court of NSW. Sadie mortgaged it to Charles William Ellis, Eva Rose Ellis and Alfred Alexader Jordan on 6/4/1939 and the mortgage was discharged on 2/10/1941 (ibid, 2003, 10).

On 2/10/1941 Sadie Maxwell sold Whitley to Edward Dryland Hordern of Killara, eldest son of Edward Carr Hordern of Wensleydale at Colo Vale (ibid, 2010). Edward was a 'Company DIrector' (ibid, 2003, 10) of retailing firm Hordern Brothers in Sydney (ibid, 2010). Horder planted many specimen trees including elms and oaks (Goldie, 1999, 56).

Hordern lived at Whitley until 1947, when (on 7/7/1947) he transferred it to Sydney Alexander Stott, Company Director of Sydney, who owned it until 1951 when he transferred it to Clarice Irene Penner, widow of Gilgandra and Florence Harrap, also a widow of Gilgandra, as joint tenants. In May 1948 Clarice Penner was regarded as sole proprietor (ibid, 2003, 10).

On 18/12/1957 Lindsay Hugh Mitchell and wife Clarice, graziers of Moss Vale, were registered as joint tenants and proprietors of Whitley, until their son Robert and his wife Helen became proprietors (ibid, 2003, 11; the LEP 2010 listing says the name was Edward Mitchells, graziers from Alice Springs).

The Mitchells sold Whitley in 1982 (ibid, 2003, 11. NB: ibid, 2010 states this was in 1980; Goldie implies it was 1981) to international antique and Australiana dealer John Hawkins and his botanical artist and gardener wife Robyn (nee Mayo). The garden is a monument to Robyn's good taste' John Hawkins is quoted as saying, noting she restored it and planted a variety of native walks throughout the property (Goldie, 1999).

The Hawkins made a number of alterations and additions to the property (ibid, 2003, 11). Under their ownership, the estate's early hawthorn hedges were cut and re-'laid' in the traditional English fashion in 1983 and again in 1986 by Mark Fowles, seven-(Goldie, 1999, 56 says eight-) times champion hedge layer of England, from Bridgnorth in Shropshire (Cavanough et al, 1988, 50, 83; modified by Stuart Read; Nottle, 1985-6, 80). Hedge-laying is a process of cutting stems part-way through, 'laying' them down on an angle, near-horizontally, sometimes weaving them through upright posts, to ensure new (all retained) growth is dense and low i.e. thick to the base with shoots so that stock cannot get through it (Read, Stuart, pers.comm., 21/6/2018). Mark Fowles trained Geoff Mc Donald (from nearby Oldbury estate) in the craft. John and Robyn Hawkins moved to Tasmania, and (it is assumed that in the interim, Mark Knowles had died), Hawkins brought out Karl Liebscher (who knew Mark Knowles) from England to lay the hedges at 'Bentleigh', Chudleigh, Tasmania (and Liebscher may have trained James Boxall in hedge laying). In the 2000s David Newby got the contact for Karl from John Hawkins who had him come to Oldbury (from England) to do more hedge-laying and renovating. Karl trained Ian Carroll (Oldbury gardener) in hedge-laying. In c.2016 James Boxall took over renovating and laying the estate hedges at Oldbury in conjunction with Ian Carroll (Chris Webb, pers.comm., 21/6/2018).

The plane tree on the entrance lawn replaced a cherry planted by Edward Hordern about 1930. The oaks and elms, as evidenced in 1896 photographs, must now be approaching 90 years of age (1988). The garden served (1988-1990s) as a setting for Haddonstone garden ornaments, and the design and layout in its present form is the work of Robyn Hawkins, with the help of local nurserymen and horticulturists (ibid, 1988, 50, 83). The garden of Whitley...has been immaculately reconstructed, but bears no resemblance to the garden first there (ibid, 1988, 75, 83).

The sale of Whitley by the Hawkins sees the beginning of another era in its history (Goldie, 1999, 56).

Several alterations have been made over the years, including the construction and later enclosure in timber shingling (c1980s) of wing extensions to the east and west. It is one of these wings that is to be altered to allow the proposed extension (LEP, 2010).

The Hawkins sold Whitley in 2002 (ibid, 2003, 11) to author Jenny Ferguson and her husband Rob, former Bankers Trust chief and now chairman of litigation lending company IMF (Australia), who bought it in 2002, having left their Hunter Valley property of 14 years, Torryburn. Jenny Ferguson published a book "A Year in My Garden" about Whitley in 2007. She previously wrote a book detailing a year at Torryburn called "A garden, A Pig and Me" (1999). The Fergusons noted that Whitley's mature trees are some of its great assets, with its planes, pines, oaks, pin oaks, elms and conifers nearing a century old, the star attraction of the garden they inherited (McIntosh, 2007).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Rare and Significant Trees-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. remnant woodland and grasses-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Special tree or trees-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Rivers and water bodies important to humans-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Conserving and protecting natural features-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Modification of terrain-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Mountains and peaks providing landmarks for humans-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Natural - pre European settlement vegetation-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Natural - regenerating native flora valued for conservation purposes-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures fencing-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Rural Estates-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Attempting to transplant European farming practices to Australian environments-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Arboretums - collections of trees for ornament or forestry-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Tourism-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Creating environments evocative of the 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens demonstrating the travels and sojurns of a gardener-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes used for self reliant recreation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes demonstrating styles in landscape design-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of scenic beauty-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant tree(s) providing rural amenity or character-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Modifying landscapes to increase productivity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Worker's Dwellings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. A Picturesque Residential Suburb-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. gentlemen's residences-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Architectural design-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Victorian era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Federation era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the prosperous - hill station summer retreats-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating workers in workers' housing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing professional people-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing public servants and officials-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing working animals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Fencing boundaries - hedging and hedgerows-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to tourist-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of rural estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Holiday homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping inland settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on rural development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural Estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Roadside Villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Artists settlement and networks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A quiet Rural District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing the social life of a rural community-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working independently on the land-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Servants quarters-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Patronising artistic endeavours-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Artists, bohemians and intellectuals squat or gathering point-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - artists gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. work of stonemasons-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Editing and publishing newspapers-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Tudor Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - neglected, regenerating to bushland-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Valuing women's contributions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Holidaying in hill stations and mountain retreats-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going bushwalking-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting lookouts and places of natural beauty-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Tourism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Sir William Owen, Supreme Court Judge-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Mark Fowles, champion UK hedge layer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Wm. Heney, first Australian editor, Sydney Morning Herald-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Ellis Rowan, famed flower painter-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Dryland Hordern, retailing businessman-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Elioth Gruner, artist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Hawkins, international antique dealer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Robyn Mayo (Hawkins), botanical artist, gardener-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Jenny Ferguson, author and gardener-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Clayden, Sydney builder-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(a) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
(b) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, and tree surgery, but not extensive lopping;
(c) Horticultural and agricultural management including pasture improvement and stock grazing (in areas outside the garden enclosure) and the eradication of noxious plants and animals;
(d) Maintenance and repair of existing farm fences, dams, water storage facilities, water reticulation systems and access roads.
Aug 7 1987
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0050402 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0050407 Aug 87 1294408
Local Environmental PlanWLEP 2010: Whitley Group, Gardens & Surrounds, HouI360, I361, I05516 Jun 10   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
A year in my garden  Jenny Ferguson  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCavanough, Jane, Prell, A. & North, Tim1988Gardens of the Southern Highlands, NSW, 1828-1988 - a fine extensive pleasure ground
WrittenDomain, July 7-8/2006 in the 'Sydney Morning Herald'2006Old Dairy added to Whitley Estate
WrittenFerguson, Jennie2007A Year in My Garden
WrittenGoldie, Vivienne1999'Whitley'
WrittenMcIntosh, Deborah2007'A year in the garden at Whitley' in High Life
WrittenNottle, Trevor1985'Some gardening skills we are in danger of losing' (hedge-laying)
WrittenRappoport P/L Heritage Consultants2003Conservation Management Plan - Whitley, Sutton Forest, NSW
WrittenRappoport P/L Heritage Consultants2003Heritage impact statement, Whitley, Sutton Forest, NSW

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045506
File number: S90/03670 & HC 33234


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.