Glenfield Farm | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Glenfield Farm

Item details

Name of item: Glenfield Farm
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -33.9583769072 Long: 150.9069638850
Primary address: 88 Leacocks Lane, Casula, NSW 2170
Parish: Minto
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Liverpool
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP1126484
PART LOT2 DP1126484
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
88 Leacocks LaneCasulaLiverpoolMintoCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Department of Planning and InfrastructureState Government 

Statement of significance:

Glenfield Farm homestead and its outbuildings are of exceptional historical significance as one of the few surviving rural farm complexes in New South Wales dating from the original land grant of 1810 and still capable of use for family living and limited farming activities.

It is associated in the 19th century with Dr Charles Throsby, an eminent colonial officer and explorer of his time (1802-1828) and in the 20th century with James Leacock, an innovative dairy farmer, entrepreneur and idealist.

Its buildings provide valuable evidence of the architectural style and nature of construction of rural buildings during the early days of European settlement, as well as the lifestyle of those who occupied it. The homestead is one of very few buildings in the State that has been continuously occupied as a private residence. The survival of all buildings relatively intact is remarkable, and is valued by the community.

Taken as a whole, the grounds of Glenfield Farm that remain have the capability to demonstrate both the core activities of the farm, and, to a modest degree, the planting tastes, garden layout, and functional requirements of successive occupants. Their approach was, for the most part, pragmatic and utilitarian - as is often the case with dairy farms - and cumulatively the grounds have high heritage significance (sic).

Glenfield Farm compares well with its colonial farm peers, in terms of having:
1. an original, very early farmhouse (1810-1817) still intact and used as a family residence;
2. virtually all its outbuildings, intact and substantial;
3. been associated with two very prominent men and their descendents throughout its long history;
4. retained, without signififcant alteration, its geometric Georgian style architecture;
5. a modest capability for animal agistment or horticulture (on the footslopes and flats);
6. a modest degree of visual prominence from the east (and railway line).
(Mayne-Wilson & Associates, 2002).
Glenfield is associated with Dr. Charles Throsby, his nephew Charles Throsby and his family. (NSW Planning & Environment Commission 1977) This farm is the oldest continuously worked farm in Australia, and its buildings rank among the earliest buildings in the country for their design and workmanship. (Earle 1974)

An intact early building group with elements of its garden and part of its original farm estate intact, with more of the broader estate area still discernable beyond.

The homestead and garden complex can still be appreciated to some extent in their original relationship with the escarpment and Glenfield Creek valley, as can some of their traditional view prospects.

There are components of the place that have individual significances such as the various buildigns, the remnant garden, archaeological resources and layout.

The place has strong associations with various notable individuals including the Throsby family and James Leacock.

The place retains its traditional prominence along the ridge from the east, as a local landmark.

The place is of considerable scientific interest on account of its archaeological research potential.

It has considerable potential to demonstrate the development of hte estate from the 1800s to the present (National Trust, 2000)
Date significance updated: 01 Oct 97
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Builder/Maker: Convict built
Construction years: 1810-1817
Physical description: SITE
{NB: In 2006 property 6.691ha. (NPWS, 2007, 13). Of this, a portion with a reduced curtilage (1.173 ha) is to be transferred to NSW Historic Houses Trust for conservation under the Endangered Houses Fund program, and to find a long term solution (private lease) for it. The remainder of curtilage (5.518ha) is to be transferred to the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service for incorporation into the adjoining Leacock Regional Park}.

Glenfield is a property of 6.691ha at Casula, located 5km south of Liverpool and accessed by Leacock's Lane, off the Hume Highway. It is surrounded to the south and north by Leacock Regional Park, with the main Southern Railway and a large area of landfill to the east, and 1988 residential subdivision, fronting Leacock's Lane, to the west. (Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners, 2007, 2).
The land to the east of the site consists of former rural pastures and the original site fencing (NPWS, 2007, 13).

The key elements of its garden are the 19th century Moreton Bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) and early 20th century pepper trees, the old water cistern and terracing of the northern garden area, including the tennis court. All are features of the proposed lot 1 and will be retained (Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners, 2007, 2). A clump of giant bamboo (Bambusa balcooa) defines one edge of the garden. Younger trees include Bunya Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) a pair of which flank the front door facing west (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 2/3/2012).

COMPLEX
The buildings on the property are located to the western part of the site on top of a ridge and contain a 14 room homestead, a dairy, coach house and privvy (NPWS, 2007, 2).
Glenfield comprises a complex of 4 historic brick buildings (an 1810-17 house, former single storey dairy, two storey stables and small privy), surrounded by shrubs and trees, sited on the eastern side of a ridge that slopes steeply to the east down to Glenfield Creek and the Georges River. Panoramic views from the site are afforded to the north, south and east over the river valley (Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners, 2007, 2).

OUTBUILDINGS
The Barn:
"The barn is probably contemporary with the Glenfield Farm house and is closely associated with it. Its floor was renewed recently in hard brick. The ground floor contained a place for the family carriage with a workroom adjoining, where harness and tools could be kept and repaired. The upper floor provided dry storage space for hay and other stock feed...There is a dummy doorway and two windows." (in Kingston, 1990, 25).
At the rear of the house there is an imposing two-storey brick building which may have been used for stables, barn or even as another dwelling house. The symmetrically placed recesses and openings on the ground floor with their semi-circular arches suggest that this building was erected at a later date than the house, possibly in the 1820s or 1830s. (Cumberland County Council 1963)

REMNANT FARM
Originally a 600 acre grant to Dr Charles Throsby in 1809. Part of 1500 acres granted to Throsby in the Minto area.
Macquarie passed through the farm on his 1810 tour of inspection, implying that farm buildings were likely to have been built around that time.

In 1859 the farm of 1000 acres was leased as a working dairy farm with a mile of river frontage to the George's River, including large areas of rye, field peas, corn and sugarcane as well as 200 fruit trees and vegetable gradens. An underground dairy produced quality butter. Outbuildings included piggeries, cow yards, two large farm sheds, four new farm huts and a substantial brick four stall stable and coach house with a granary above.

Early 20th century, it was subdivided and sold by Archer Broughton Throsby, although he was recorded as still residing at Glenfield Farm on his death in 1925. In 1920 James Freeland Leacock, who had married a descendent of the Broughton family of Appin, bought Glenfield for a dairy farm.
Surviving elements such as old fenceposts remain on the estate.

GARDEN
Two bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii) have been planted on axis with the western entrance door of the homestead.
A clump of gian bamboo defines the edge of the gardene area of the farm. Silky oaks (Grevillea robusta), African olives (Olea africana), pepper trees / peppercorns (Schinus areira), and more recent eucalypts make up the dominant tree canopy around the homestead complex.

CURRENT CONTEXT/ STREET ADDRESS (LEACOCK'S LANE/ GLEN REGENT ESTATE)
The entrance gates to Glenfield Farm contrast with a hard suburban treatment to the road, of street trees, kerb and guttering, and standard road surface. These elements are intrusive on its setting.

Standard residential subdivision from 1988 surrounds Glenfield Farm on the south, west and north, to the edge of the escarpment. Its nature, and proximity, for example with houses abutting right up to the western edge of Leacock's Lane, is unfortunate, compromising the setting of Glenfield Farm, and obscuring its traditional views from each of the three entrance driveways/ paths looking west up to the remnant vegetated ridgeline beyond.

Only from the east is a more open aspect still evident, with a steep slope to Glenfield Creek, the southern railway line, George's River and a large area of landfill to the south-east.
Two residences, one a modern brick construction, have been built adjoining Glenfield Farm east of Leacock's Lane. The curtilage of Glenfield Farm wraps around these lots.

HOMESTEAD
The homestead is a Colonial Georgian convict-built homestead of 14 rooms with kitchen, pantry and cellar. The roof extends over the stone flagged verandahs on three sides and is supported on turned wooden columns. The wooden shingles of the original roof can still be seen under the iron. The house has brick cellars and two attic rooms with gable windows facing the prospect to the east.

The English Bond brickwork construction is of a very high quality, particularly evident in the cellars, where arches support the walls above. The bricks are made from local clay. The lime in both the mortar and render is made from crushed oyster shell, with the latter clearly visible.

The joinery throughout is cedar. There are six-panelled doors and french windows with small wooden panels at the base and small glass panes held in fine wooden glazing bars. The mouldings of the architraves and chimney pieces are typical of Colonial Georgian design.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition is good. Archaeological potential is high.
Date condition updated:14 Aug 97
Modifications and dates: 600 acre grant to Dr Charles Throsby in 1809. Part of 1500 acres granted to Throsby in the Minto area.
Macquarie passed through the farm on his 1810 tour of inspection, implying that farm buildings were likely to have been built around that time.

1820s southern additions at end of verandah.

1859 the farm of 1000 acres was leased as a working dairy farm with a mile of river frontage to the George's River, including large areas of rye, field peas, corn and sugarcane as well as 200 fruit trees and vegetable gardens.

An underground dairy produced quality butter. Outbuildings included piggeries, cow yards, two large farm sheds, four new farm huts and a substantial brick four stall stable and coach house with a granary above.

Early 20th century, subdivided and sold by Archer Broughton Throsby, although he was recorded as still residing at Glenfield Farm on his death in 1925.

1920 James Freeland Leacock, who had married a descendent of the Broughton family of Appin, bought Glenfield for a dairy farm. Glenfield Farmhouse built between 1810 to 1817.

Remnant farm of approximately 14 acres in 1974. The residents continued farming activities.

1977 student report by Mark Bullen & Ian McGilvray indicated that the vegetation associated with the estate was mostly confined to the ridge with cleared land used for grazing and market gardening to the east.

c1983 roof cladding and plumbing replacement and reconstruction of dormer windows by Cox Tanner P/L Architects
1984 Leacock's Lane was still unsealed when "The Glenfield Story" was published. The remaining estate was incorporated into a residential subdivision, with Leacock's Lane as its main circulation ring road (off the Hume Highway).

c1987 introduction of sub ground level concrete barrier to discourage Moreton Bay fig tree roots from destabilising foundations.
1988 (spring) Glenfield rewired by J & M Norris Electrical Contractors. 1988: The Glen Regent estate was begun (residential subdivision which now surrounds the place to west, south and north).

c1990 replacement of ceiling in rooms 8 & 9. Concrete render applied to external brickwork at room 14, west wall. Repointing of brickwork at west elevation (predominantly under the sills). Former bathroom at the northwest corner has been demolished, and a new verandah column installed. (Anglin Associates with Hughes Trueman Ludlow, 1990, 6).

1991 2 progress reports on termite damage control and remediation works to ceilings, external painting, repointing, rendering, brickwork replacement and repointing on west wall of room 14, kitchen.

1996 A draft Plan of Management for Leacock Regional Park (to the east) was commissioned.

2003 property purchased by Department of Planning. Warwick Mayne-Wilson prepared a conservation management plan.

2006 property with reduced curtilage (1.173 ha) transferred to NSW Historic Houses Trust. The remainder of curtilage (5.518ha) transferred to the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service for incorporation into the adjoining Leacock Regional Park.

2008: AIA (Heritage) Architecture Award given for the restoration of Glenfield for the Historic Houses Trust, NSW: Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners
This is the first house to be saved through the Historic Houses Trust of NSW Endangered Houses Fund. 'Glenfield' is the most intact house of the Macquarie period, 1810-1821. Not only does the house survive but so do its principal outbuildings: privy, dairy/bakehouse and stables/coach house. Inside, the house retains virtually all its cedar fittings: doors, windows, reveal shutters and fireplace surrounds. It is, as the heritage architect says, 'a bungalow, a little country house built for a gentleman'.

The new occupants will find a house ready for occupation (new wet areas and conveniences have been inserted) and will be armed with a wealth of resources on how to maintain the house into the future. Wherever possible the original Georgian details have been highlighted and even reconstructed, for example, rotten or missing Edwardian sashes have been replaced with Georgian sashes and the stable sham windows and door fanlights have been redone in trompe l'oeil. Damp and termites have been eradicated and the house treated with original finishes. The garden has been reconstructed under the guiding hand of James Broadbent. This is the quintessential conservation exercise, involving preservation, restoration, reconstruction and adaptation. It is expertly researched and meticulously executed. It follows established conservation principles in an exemplary manner. (AIA, www.architecture.com.au/i-cms?page=11388)
2006-8: 21,000 litre plastic water tank inserted into original brick lined underground well (c.1817) rear (south) of main house. An existing concrete water tank was relocated to collect rainwater from the stables block roof. Throughout the garden, tapes were fitted for both mains and tank water supply, with an electric pump fitted to the tank for extra pressure to accommodate mobile sprinklers (HHT, 2008, 13).

2011 - marketed byChristies - did not in the end, sell
2012 - on real estate market again
Further information: See conservation policies in 2002 CMP esp. 6.6 Precincts & Elements; 6.7 Setting & Visual relationships; 6.8 Access; 6.9 Management in terms of cultural significance; 7:0 Implementation of Conservation Policies
Current use: Co-operative farming.
Former use: Pastoralism, homestead, co-operative farming.

History

Historical notes: Dr. Charles Throsby arrived in New South Wales in 1802 as a surgeon on the transport 'Coromandel'. He took the post of acting surgeon and magistrate at Castle Hill and was transferred to Newcastle in 1804, where he became commandant for four years.

In 1809 Throsby resigned from the positions of Assistant Colonial Surgeon and Magistrate. During this period he had established grazing in the Newcastle area. On 22 May 1811 Throsby was granted 950 acres of land (at Casula) which he named Glenfield after his birthplace, a village near Leicester in England. The farmhouse was built in about 1817 (Leary, 1979, 151).

From March to April 1818, he travelled on a tour of discovery to Jervis Bay. Throsby's exploration included the discovery of the Wollondilly River, exploration of the country around Goulburn, the first visit of white men to the Ferderal Capital area and the cross country trek between Goulburn and Bathurst. The discovery of the headwaters of the Shoalhaven River and another route between the tableland of the Shoalhaven River and a possible route between the tableland and the coast of Jervis Bay are also attributed to Throsby.

In April and May 1819 Throsby undertook his tour to Bathurst through the Cow Pastures and in May 1819, Governor Macquarie offered him a grant of land as remuneration for services rendered in making important discoveries. So impressed was Macquarie with Throsby's explorations, that he offered him public tribute for the zealous perserverance by which he was activated - and granted him 1000 acres of land in the Moss Vale area.

Dr. Throsby's nephew, also named Charles Throsby, arrived in New South Wales on the 'Mangles' on 7th August 1820. He joined his uncle and took charge of Throsby Park on the Wingecarribee River (near present day Moss Vale).

On 19 August 1820, Joseph Wild (of Throsby's party and under his direction) discovered Lake George, and in 1821 Throsby made the first mention of the possibility of the Murrumbidgee River of which he had heard from the natives. In April 1821, Charles Throsby reached the Murrumbidgee somewhere in what is now the Federal Territory.

Governor Macquarie made Throsby a magistrate of the territory in March 1821, with main jurisdiction over the new County of Argyle. He was also a member of the committee for the first Agricultural Society in Sydney. During this time, Throsby had been involved in financial troubles brought on by a 5,000 pound surety he had taken on behalf of Graham Blaxcell. Blaxcell absconded from the colony in 1817 and died on board ship, leaving Throsby at the mercy of the creditors.

Ten years' litigation ended in an adverse verdict for Throsby, who by 1828 was also affected by the drought and falling wool prices. In April 1825, Charles Throsby committed suicide at Glenfield Farm, aged 51.

Upon Dr Throsby's death, nephew Charles inherited Glenfield, Throsby Park and other scattered parts of his uncle's properties. After Charles' death Glenfield Farm was passed down successive heirs in the Throsby-Broughton family.

In 1920 James Leacock purchased Glenfield Farm. In 1924 he married a Broughton and in 1930 they moved into Glenfield Farm after modifying the homestead to serve as a dual residence, accomodating himself and his wife in one half and his sister and mother in the other. This dual dwelling arrangement began in 1932.

James Leacock brought dairy farming to the Liverpool district. He formed the Hygenic Dairies Ltd at Concord in 1909 to supply Sydney with its first bottled milk. His idealism embraced many interests, ranging from organic farming to Aboriginal rights. He undertook many activities on the farm property which made Glenfield a meeting place for groups concerned for Australian and international justice and many humanitarian issues.

Leacock pursued the establishment of communal living, discussion centres and co-operative farming. The first serious co-operative was the Rural Homes (Glenfield) Co-operative Ltd, formed in 1951. In 1960 the co-operative went into insolvency. In 1970 the Glenfield Goodwill Co-operative Society was registered.

A decline in the co-operative spirit was brought to a head at the 1976 Annual General meeting, when it was decided that the Co-operative should be terminated. However, the Co-operative adopted a more realistic landlord role and increased rents to near market levels. After the venture failed Leacock bought back the farm and approximately 14 acres on which he resided until his death in 1974. The residents at Glenfield Farm continued farming activities.

A 1977 student report by Mark Bullen & Ian McGilvray indicated that the vegetation associated with the estate was mostly confined to the ridge with cleared land used for grazing and market gardeneing to the east.

The Heritage Council of NSW commissioned Howard Tanner and Associates to carry out a measured survey and report, providing staged recommendations and proposals for the place's future use. Glenfield was found to be in an advanced stage of dilapidation, and following completion of the study a grant from the Heritage Conservation Fund enabled the first stage of repair works to be carried out. Architects Howard Tanner and Tim Throsby supervised the first stage of roof repairs which was completed in september 1983. During repairs, photographic documentation was caried out and evidence was uncovered that confirmed the original sequence of construction. The original timber shingles had been overlaid during the 19th century by patent Morewood and Rogers galvanised iron sheets for tiles. These were either repaired or replaced and correct flashing details reintroduced. The Glenfield Cooperative regularly opens the house for public inspection while drawing income from its farm activities. In this way staged conservation works will continue with ongoing Heritage Council assistance.

Glenfield Farm is fortunate in being located within an area set aside for open space and public recreation between Leacock's Lane, named after the family of the previous owner, Jim Leacock, and the Georges River. The Department of Environment and Planning has already acquired a considerable area of land in the vicinity for this purpose. When fully implemented this proposal will provide an appropriate setting for Glenfield Farm (Heritage Council News, summer 1984).

Leacock's Lane was still unsealed when "The Glenfield Story" was published in 1984. The remaining estate was incorporated into a residential subdivision, with Leacock's Lane as its main circulation ring road (off the Hume Highway).

The Glen Regent estate was begun in 1988.
A draft Plan of Management for Leacock Regional Park was commissioned in 1996 (Britton & Morris, 2000, 4.4., 39)

2002/3 Federal Heritage CHPP grant of $46,393 awarded for urgent works.

2003 property (13 acres) purchased by NSW Department of Planning, and Mayne-WIlson & Associates prepared a conservation management plan for it.

2006 property with a reduced curtilage (1.173 ha) is to be transferred to NSW Historic Houses Trust for conservation (the first such) under the Endangered Houses Fund program, and to find a long term solution (private lease) for it. The remainder of curtilage (5.518ha) is to be transferred to the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service for incorporation into the adjoining Leacock Regional Park.

2007 - finalisation of a plan of management for Leacock Regional Park (NPWS)

2008-11:
2008: AIA (Heritage) Architecture Award given for restoration of Glenfield by the Historic Houses Trust, NSW: Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners. 'Glenfield' is the most intact house of the Macquarie period, 1810-1821. Not only does the house survive but so do its principal outbuildings: privy, dairy/bakehouse and stables/coach house. Inside, the house retains virtually all its cedar fittings: doors, windows, reveal shutters and fireplace surrounds. It is, as the heritage architect says, 'a bungalow, a little country house built for a gentleman'.

The new occupants will find a house ready for occupation (new wet areas and conveniences have been inserted) and will be armed with a wealth of resources on how to maintain the house into the future. Wherever possible the original Georgian details have been highlighted and even reconstructed, for example, rotten or missing Edwardian sashes have been replaced with Georgian sashes and the stable sham windows and door fanlights have been redone in trompe l'oeil. Damp and termites have been eradicated and the house treated with original finishes. The garden has been reconstructed under the guiding hand of James Broadbent. This is the quintessential conservation exercise, involving preservation, restoration, reconstruction and adaptation. It is expertly researched and meticulously executed. It follows established conservation principles in an exemplary manner. (AIA, www.architecture.com.au/i-cms?page=11388)
2006-8: 21,000 litre plastic water tank inserted into original brick lined underground well (c.1817) rear (south) of main house. An existing concrete water tank was relocated to collect rainwater from the stables block roof. Throughout the garden, tapes were fitted for both mains and tank water supply, with an electric pump fitted to the tank for extra pressure to accommodate mobile sprinklers (HHT, 2008, 13).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Exploration-Activities associated with making places previously unknown to a cultural group known to them. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Selecting land for pastoral or agricultural purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating agriculture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Rutherford, principal of Cobb and Co. and of Eskbank Iron Works-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Dr Charles Throsby, retired naval surgeon, explorer, farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Leacock, dairy farmer, South-West Sydney-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Aaron Muron Bolot, architect-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Glenfield has notable associations with Dr. Charles Throsby, his nephew Charles Throsby and his family. (NSW Planning & Environment Commission 1977) This farm is the oldest continuously worked farm in Australia, and its buildings rank amongst the earliest buildings in the country for their design and workmanship. (Earle 1974)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Undertake a conservation management plan for the farm ensuring that considerations of curtilage and elements of the cultural landscape are taken into account. Amend SHR listing to take into account the views and context beyond existing PCO/SHR boundary. Ensure appropriate controls on areas beyond estate to the east within the estate's visual catchment particularly the scale, height and tratement of the adjacent landfill area, and the area to the west where recent residential development and street design treatment is already intrusive. Investigate removal of kerb and guttering treatment and street trees from in front (west) of the estate on Leacock's Lane, as these compromise its western address. Investigate replacement of road surface in this address, along with road edge, to reflect a more rural character. Where possible investigate rezoning as open space the area to the west of Glenfield Farm and remove recent buildings and associated plantings, and intrusive buildings either side of estate. Ensure access to and through the place, as regional open space, does not compromise the key objective of conserving its significant fabric and layout.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentConservation Management Plan for Glenfield Farm, 88 Leacocks Lane, Casula Comments provided on draft CMP 30 May 2002. May 30 2002
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementConservation Management Plan for Glenfield Farm, 88 Leacocks Lane, Casula CMP endorsed by Heritage Council 7 August 2002 for a period of five years, expires 7 August 2007. Aug 7 2002
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2)

I, the Minister for Planning, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act, 1977, do, by this my order:
(1) revoke the existing exemptions made to the Historic Houses Trust under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act; and
(2) under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act grant an exemption from all section 57(1) activities to properties owned or managed by the Historic Houses Trust and listed on the State Heritage Register as outlined in Schedule A with the following conditions:
(a) that the Historic Houses Trust provide an annual report to the Heritage Council on future works proposed for its properties;
(b) that the Historic Houses Trust advise the Heritage Office archaeologists of any proposed works requiring major excavation at its properties to allow due consideration of the need for additional archaeological work;
(c) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must lodge all archaeological monitoring or excavation reports prepared with the Heritage Office library on completion after review by Heritage Office archaeologists;
(d) that the Historic Houses Trust employ as required a consultant historical archaeologist with appropriate archaeological qualifications, knowledge, skills and experience and the Director of the HHT must obtain the advice of that person about the heritage significance of the archaeological resource and/or the impact of the development proposal on the heritage significance of the archaeological resource, and take that advice into account;
(e) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must take into account as far as practicable the cumulative effect of approvals on the heritage significance of the item and on the heritage resource of its area;
(f) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must ensure that approvals are in accordance with any requirements, guidelines, regulations and general conditions issued by the Heritage Council. The Director of the Historic Houses Trust may impose additional conditions which do not conflict with any Heritage Council conditions.

The Hon Frank Sartor MP
Minister for Planning
Minister for Redfern Waterloo
Minister for the Arts

11 April 2008

SCHEDULE A

Item State Heritage Register Listing Number

1. Elizabeth Farm 00001
2. Rouse Hill House 00002
3. Elizabeth Bay House 00006
4. Glenfield Farm, Casula 00025
5. Hyde Park Barracks and The Mint 00190
6. Exeter Farm (Meurant's Cottage) 00205
7. The Rose Seidler House 00261
8. Wentworth Mausoleum 00622
9. Justice and Police Museum 00673
10. Meroogal, Nowra 00953
11. Vaucluse House 00955
12. Government House, Sydney 01070
13. First Government House Site (Museum of Sydney) 01309
14. Susannah Place 01310
Apr 24 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
39Minister makes heritage agreementHeritage Agreement signed by Minister Sep 14 2011

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0002502 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0002523 May 80 762573
Local Environmental Plan 025203 Feb 95 11665
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67     
National Trust of Australia register  776611 Feb 74   
Register of the National Estate 328921 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW20004.4Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written 1991Glenfield Farm Restoration Project: Progress Report no. 2
WrittenAnglin Associates with Hughes Trueman Ludlow1990Glenfield Farm Homestead Condition Report
WrittenBaker, Helen, for Cumberland County Council1963Historic Buildings, Vol III, Liverpool and Campbelltown
WrittenBill Leah, illustrated by Maggie Fooke1984Glenfield story
WrittenBritton, G. & Morris, C. For the National Trust of Australia (NSW)2000Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain & Camden
WrittenBullen, M. & McGillvray, I.1977Glenfield Farm
WrittenCox Tanner P/L1981Restoration report on Glenfield Farm, Leacock's Lane, Casula
WrittenCumberland County Council1968Register of Places of Historic Interest in the County of Cumberland Vol 1
WrittenD Earle1974National trust Classification Card - Glenfield Farm
WrittenGray, Dave2008Water Wisdom
WrittenHeritage Council of NSW2013'A Start at Glenfield Farm', in Heritage Conservation News, vol.2, no.4, summer 2013
WrittenKingston, Daphne1990Early Colonial Homes of the Sydney Region 1788-1838
WrittenLeary, Frank & Judith1979Colonial Heritage - Historic buildings of NSW
WrittenMayne-Wilson, W. & Associates2003Conservation Management Plan for Glenfield Farm, 88 Leacock's Lane, Casula
WrittenNSW National Parks & Wildlife Service2007Leacock Regional Park - draft Plan of Management
WrittenRoxburgh, Rachel1974Early Colonial Houses of NSW

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045531
File number: 10/21113; S90/04052; HC32096


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