Jarvisfield | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Jarvisfield

Item details

Name of item: Jarvisfield
Other name/s: Wilton; Antill Park Golf Course clubhouse
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Landscape - Cultural
Category: Historic Landscape
Location: Lat: -34.1641524944 Long: 150.6285214820
Primary address: Hume Highway Deviation, Picton, NSW 2571
Parish: Picton
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wollondilly
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP789555
LOT2 DP789555
LOT3 DP873571
LOT4 DP873571
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Hume Highway DeviationPictonWollondillyPictonCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Wollondilly Shire CouncilLocal Government12 Mar 99

Statement of significance:

Jarvisfield's remaining estate is a rural cultural landscape containing the core of the original farm grant, the third Antill house constructed on it, a sandstone stable outbulding and extensive grounds containing considerable numbers of mature exotic and native trees planted by the Antills.

These early plantings give a representative selection of common exotic and some locally native tree species often used on the Cumberland Plain's early farms. These also include some now very rare plants in NSW, and particularly locally rare in the Sydney Basin, such as Chinese funeral cypress (Cupressus funebris) and American osage orange (Maclura pomifera).

Osage oranges are now extremely rare in the Sydney basin - only two other examples are known, at Hambledon Cottage, Parramatta and Muogamarra Nature Reserve, Hornsby (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 14/5/03).
Date significance updated: 17 Aug 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: William Weaver architect-engineer
Construction years: 1815-1864
Physical description: Estate:
The core of a once large (2000 acre) grant remains, today managed as a golf course estate near the town of Picton.

The golf course is an 18 Hole course with a challenging Par 70 layout, including many picturesque holes flanked by water hazards. At the centre of the Antill Park Country Golf Club is the clubhouse overlooking the 9th Hole and the 10th Tee (www.antillpark.com.au, accessed 14/9/2010, with addition by Stuart Read, re Antill and Jarvis links).

Garden and early plantings:
The house is surrounded by still extensive grounds, formerly gardens and farmland, now the Antill Park Country Golf Club (since 1967) (www.antillpark.com.au, accessed 14/9/2010, with addition by Stuart Read, re Antill and Jarvis links). Little evidence of the homestead garden has survived. There are some mature specimens of native pines (Araucaria spp. - hoop (A.cunninghamii) and Bunya (A.bidwillii) pines in the front of the house which are important plantings (LEP, 1991; 2011) and survive in 2012 (Kabaila).

Considerable numbers of mature exotic and native trees planted by the Antills remain, along with more recent Golf Club era plantings. Early tree plantings remaining near the house give a representative selection of common exotic and some locally native tree species often used on the Cumberland Plain's early farms. These also include some now very rare plants in NSW, and particularly locally rare in the Sydney Basin, such as Chinese funeral cypress (Cupressus funebris) and the American Osage orange (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 14/5/03).

Early tree plantings include Bunya pines (Araucaria bidwillii), hoop pines (Araucaria cunninghamii), English elms (Ulmus procera) which have suckered into thickets in places, kurrajongs (Brachychiton populneus), white cedars (Melia azederach var.australasica), English oaks (Quercus robur), shelter belts/former farm hedges of American Osage orange (Maclura pomifera). Osage oranges are now extremely rare in the Sydney basin - only two other examples are known, at Hambledon Cottage, Parramatta and Muogamarra Nature Reserve, Hornsby (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 14/5/03). The Osage orange hedges north and south of the house on its eastern side date to the time the house was first occupied. They have historical significance as part of the early fabric of the place and their association with the Antill family, and are an integral component of the landscaping (Kabaila, 2012, 38).

Other early plantings include false acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia, again probably originally shelter belt plantings), again suckering into thickets (Stuart Read, pers.comm., 14/5/03).

Farm Building Complex:
Homestead:
The (now Golf Club-) house was built in 1863 by John Macquarie Antill, hence the name of the Club, Antill Park Country Golf Club. It was first named Jarvisfield, commemorating Governor Macquarie's first wife Jane Jarvis' name and the fact that an Antill had been long-serving aide-de-camp to and a friend of Governor Macquarie. The homestead's verandah overlooks the course and is frequented by locals and visitors who wish to analyse their round, the treachery of the greens or simply enjoy the serene views through out the course (www.antillpark.com.au, accessed 14/9/2010, with addition by Stuart Read, re Antill and Jarvis links).

A two storey, rendered brick, Georgian Revival country villa with flanking single storey wings which form the sides of the rear courtyard. The hipped roofs of main house and wings are slated and have rendered brickwork chimneys with simple neck mouldings. The single storey verandah lining the front and part of the two side elevations retain their original flat timber columns (but has a new roof following the removal of an Edwardian double storeyed verandah). The new roof line follows the original which was retained in the side return roofs. The front door is flanked by French doors with 2 x 6 paned sash windows to the first floor. On the side elevations blank window recesses maintain facade symmetry at first floor level. The rear elevation is dominated by a large round-headed stair window.

Barn:
The site also contains a mid-19th century stone barn. The barn is a simple gable-roofed structure of coursed sparrow-pecked sandstone with exposed timber beams and rafters. Following the site's conversion to a golf course the barn was reused as a Pro-Golf Shop and has undergone extensive internal change as a result. (LEP, 1991; 2011).

A stable outbuilding, two storied and made of sandstone blocks, remains to the south-west of the main house (AHC).

The group listed by the Australian Heritage Commission consists of:

. the former Homestead, Jarvisfield (WO0148)
. the Jarvisfield Stone Barn (WO0149)
. the Brookside Restaurant (Razorback Inn) (WO0150).

When the listing was made, these were rural buildings which retained their original relationship to the main road, to each other and to the rural landscape. The group is now part of a golf course with modern residential subdivision in close proximity to the house and barn. A new access road through the new subdivision has been provided.(LEP, 1991; 2011).

Razorback Inn (former, 1850):
The Brookside Restaurant (former Razorback Inn), is now at 1580 Hume Highway Deviation, and separately LEP-listed (LEP, 2011). Built on four acres sold by H.C.Antill to Oliver Whiting ex-convict and servant of the Antill family. It appears that the inn was completed in 1850 and a licence issued for that date. Continued to operate until Whitings moved to an inn at Picton when the railway opened. A Mr. Turner who later lived in the building found two English pennies dated 1850 under the foundations of the place when renovating it. Later used as a guest-house and residence named "Brookside", also as a restaurant. It is now used in association with the Woolshed complex for functions (LEP, 2011).

Third House (1864/5):
The third house built on the grant in 1864/5 remains, a large two storey brick mansion/house plastered over, with verandah facing east, and two wings single storeyed wings to rear (west).

Jarvisfield Store (now 470 Menangle Street, Picton and separately LEP-listed)(1863):
Built on 114 acre lot in 1863 (date in plaster plaque), the land forming part of Jarvisfield where H.C.Antill developed the town of Picton in response to the coming of the railway line and station. One of many small shops catering for the general public until closure of the Picton railway depot. Later known as "The Bailiff's" because retired police sergeant, McRae, lived there and was town bailiff after retiring from the force. In recent years it was used as a residence and it has now been refurbished for use as an antiques shop (LEP, 2011).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
1810s 1st slab homestead built on this site.
C.1824-5 Major H.C.Antill built a larger family house.
Both of these buildings stood below (a few hundred metres to the east of) the present house/mansion. Part of the second house still stood in 1937.

1864/5 the third house built 1864/5 of bricks made on the property.

1967 the estate became the Antill Park Country Golf Club, and the third house its clubhouse .
Date condition updated:13 May 03
Modifications and dates: See above.
c.1910 upper storey homestead verandah added, ground floor verandah modified, upper floor French doors added
1964 conversion of homestead to Golf Club house, by Howard Morton, architect
c1985 restoration works including drainage, ground floor verandah, removal of upper verandah doors undertaken by Howard Tanner, architect.
2012 Ground floor verandah restoration and roof repair by NSW Public Works (Dept. of Commerce)(Kabaila, 2012, 2).
Further information: Date of current mansion unknown.
Current use: Golf course
Former use: Aboriginal land, pastoral property

History

Historical notes: Jarvisfield was home of the Antill family from c.1817-1937 (at least - see ref.s). Major H.C.Antill was born in New York in 1779, second son of John and Margaret Antill. John was a Major of the Second Batallion of the New Jersey Volunteers (Loyalists). Margaret was granddaughter of Cadwallader Colden. Henry enlisted with the British Army as ensign in 1796, served with the 73rd Regiment, was promoted to Captain in 1809 and received a medal for bravery following the storming of Seringaptam in India, where he was badly wounded. Along with Governor and Mrs Macquarie he arrived in Sydney on the HMS Dromedary in December 1809 with his regiment, and was appointed Aide-de-Camp to Macquarie on 1 January 1810 (http://jarvisfield.com/history.html).

Antill retired from the Army in 1821 and in 1822 was the first to receive a grant of 2000 acres in the area now known as Picton (ibid: then known as Stonequarry), over the brow of Razorback mountain. Antill named a nearby hill Mount Nebo and built the first slab homestead on this site in the 1810s. He later built a larger family house, c.1823-4, naming it 'Wilton' for his father's estate in the American colonies, but later changing the name to 'Jarvisfield', to honour Governor Macquarie's first wife's maiden name, Jarvis. Antill had known Jane Jarvis in India, and was both friend of and Aide-de-Camp to Governor Macquarie.

The name Jarvis Field was taken from a property owned by Macquarie on the Isle of Mull in Scotland. From 1831-3 Antill was a director of the Bank of New South Wales and later became Police Magistrate for the County of Camden from 2 October 1829 until his death in 1852 (ibid).

Major Antill called the town (Stonequarry) Picton after General Sir Thomas Picton, a hero of Waterloo (Carroll, 1983, 44).

Major H.C.Antill retired on half pay and settled on his grant, tending sheep, pigs and cows. He was the squire of the Picton district, a magistrate, pillar of the local church (St. Mark's Anglican, Picton), supporter of the local school. Major H.C.Antill died in 1852, and was buried in the family vault on a hill north of and overlooking the town of Picton (Maguire, 1984, 47-48).

The Brookside Restaurant (former Razorback Inn), is now at 1580 Hume Highway Deviation, and separately LEP-listed (LEP, 2011). Built on four acres sold by H.C.Antill to Oliver Whiting ex-convict and servant of the Antill family. It appears that the inn was completed in 1850 and a licence issued for that date. Continued to operate until Whitings moved to an inn at Picton when the railway opened. A Mr. Turner who later lived in the building found two English pennies dated 1850 under the foundations of the place when renovating it. Later used as a guest-house and residence named "Brookside", also as a restaurant. It is now used in association with the Woolshed complex for functions (LEP, 2011).

Architect and engineer William Weaver (1828-68) designed (the current house) Jarvisfield for Antill. It was built in 1863. Plans for the house (and of Burrundulla, Mudgee for the Cox family) still exist, and are clear examples of Weaver's capability as an architect and of his apparently consistent preference for a traditional colonial style. Burrundulla, with its wide sides and surrounding verandah, illustrates the versatility of conservative Georgian colonial design in Weaver's hands, whereas Jarvisfield recalls the stronger lines of (Weaver's) Villa Maria (1857) at Gladesville. The features of the back of both buildings are almost identical, with arched landing windows set with coloured glass, elongated sides and courtyard (Maguire, 1984, 47-48).

Both of these buildings stood below (a few hundred metres to the east of) the present brick/plaster mansion. Part of the second house still stood in 1937. Bricks for the house were made on the property. A new house (3rd) was made in 1864/5 by John Macquarie Antill, who founded the Jarvisfield Ayrshire Stud in 1875. He was a prominent breeder and agriculturist.

At least three generations of Antills lived at Jarvisfield until the 1930s: Henry Colden Antill (1779-1852), John Macquarie Antill Senior (1822-1900) and John Macquarie Antill Junior (1866-1937). Henry Colden was born in New York of British stock, his great grandfather Edward having migrated from England to America in 1680. His father John had fought in the war of American Independence. The family migrated first to Canada; Henry was in the British army in India; he migrated to Sydney on 1 January 1810, married Eliza Wills in Sydney in 1818, settled near Liverpool, in 1825 settling on his estate near Picton, Jarvisfield and, in 1844 subdivided part of his estate on the north of Stonequarry Creek, as the result he made possible the founding of the town of Picton (originally known as Stonequarry). Henry died and was buried in the family vault at Jarvisfield, in August 1852, survived by six sons and two daughters (http://www.auspostalhistory.com/articles/1721.php).

John Macquarie Antill Sr. was born in Liverpool on 30 May 1822 and at age 18 went to manage the Primrose Valley estate, Molonglo, NSW, concentrating on sheep breeding. At 24 he was appointed a Police Magistrate in Picton, holding this position until his death in 1900. His wife Jessie Hassall Campbell was born on 28 March 1834, married J.M.Antill Sr. in 1851 and continued to live in Jarvisfield with a daughter and their grandchildren, after her husband's death in 1900. She died in Picton in 1917. J.M.Antill Sr. was appointed receiving officer for the Camden electorate in1877, which included Picton. He inherited Jarvisfield in 1858, building a new homestead there for his family in 1864. Wheat growing was ruined by rust, and sheep-raising on account of fluke, both apparently because it was too close to the coast. In 1875 from imported stock, John Sr. established the Ayrshire Study which made Jarvisfield famous. Jessie and John Sr. had 11 children, two of whom did not reach adult life (http://www.auspostalhistory.com/articles/1721.php).

Antill's grandson Major-General John Macquarie Antill was born at Jarvisfield on 26 January 1866, second surviving son of John and Jessie. John Jr. was educated at Sydney Grammar School and became a surveyor. He joined the local militia in 1887 and in 1889, raised a squadron of mounted infantry in Picton, of which he was given command. This became part of the NSW Mounted Rifles, in which he was commissioned as a captain on 19 January 1889. He had a tour of duty with the British Army in India in 1893. On return to Australia in 1894, he was commissioned into the state's permanent forces as a captain. He was promoted to Major in 1899 and given command of 'A' Squadron of the NSW Mounted Rifles. This squadron participated in the cavalry sweep to relieve Kimberley (Sth.Africa) and was involved in operations in Transvaal and Orange RIver Colony. Antill was mentioned twice in dispatches, appointed Companion of Bath (CB), returning to Australia a war hero. From 1904-6 he emulated his grandfather by becoming Aide-de-Camp to the Governor-General, Lord Northcote. After this he retired from the army and returned to Picton. In World War 1 in October 1914 he was appointed to the AIF as brigade major of the 3rd Light Horse Brigade in Turkey. He retired from the army in 1924 with the honorary rank of Major-General, spending several years at Jarvisfield and later living at Manly and Dee Why (http://www.auspostalhistory.com/articles/1721.php). Mjr.-Gen. Antill died in 1937, leaving his older brother Robert Henry (Harry) in charge. R.H.Antill was a prominent pastoralist and a noted breeder of Ayrshire cattle. He was chairman of the Picton Pastures Protection Board in 1901-28 and served as district coroner for forty-two years. (Robert Lawrie, Anthony Green, in (http://www.auspostalhistory.com/articles/1721.php)).

In 1961 Jarvisfield House (which was still owned by the Antill family) was leased to the (then) Picton Council on a twenty year lease, for a club-house for the Antill Country Golf Club (Nesta Griffiths, 1976).

In 1967 the Antill Park Golf Club was established on the site, with the homestead forming the club house.

Antill Park Golf Club:
The golf course is an 18 Hole course with a challenging Par 70 layout, including many picturesque holes flanked by water hazards. At the centre of the Antill Park Country Golf Club is the clubhouse overlooking the 9th Hole and the 10th Tee (www.antillpark.com.au, accessed 14/9/2010).

Golf History:
The 1890s and early 1900s were a golden period for the development of Australian golf clubs. In Victoria, apart from Royal Melbourne, there were many other clubs appearing, including Surrey Hills, Kew and Essendon (1893 - 4); Victoria Golf Club (1902); Geelong Golf Club (1892) and Metropolitan Golf Club (1906). There was also plenty of activity in New South Wales, with Royal Sydney, the Australian and Concord Golf Clubs leading the way. Whilst the Australian Golf Club was dormant between 1888 and 1896, the Sydney Golf Club was formed in 1893 (Holliday, 1979, 34).

2012 is believed to be the 50th anniversary of formation of the Antill Park Golf Club, lease of the present site and club house. The original club occupied part of a private property on both sides of the present Henry Street (Antill Park Country Golf Club, 2011).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. River flats-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Modification of terrain-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Introduce cultural planting-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Working for pastoralists-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Beef cattle breeding and raising-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for lamb and mutton-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Boarding Houses-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Farm homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Sport-Activities associated with organised recreational and health promotional activities badminton-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Sport-Activities associated with organised recreational and health promotional activities Golf-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Weaver, Colonial Architect 1855-6, architect-engineer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Aaron Muron Bolot, architect-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
he Osage orange hedges north and south of the house on its eastern side date to the time the house was first occupied. They have historical significance as part of the early fabric of the place and their association with the Antill family, and are an integral component of the landscaping (Kabaila, 2012, 38).
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
he Osage orange hedges north and south of the house on its eastern side date to the time the house was first occupied. They have historical significance as part of the early fabric of the place and their association with the Antill family, and are an integral component of the landscaping (Kabaila, 2012, 38).
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Review 2012 CMS every time works are proposed on site / every 12 months / every September end of Financial Year (whichever is first) in consultation with Council heritage adviser (Kabaila, 2012, 2). For future modifications, constraints arising from the Burra Charter are: -provision to be made for continuing security of the place and maintenance of significant items; -all conservation works should involve minimum interference to existing significant fabric; - conservation policies should determine uses are compatible; -the visual setting for significant items must be maintained and no new construction or other action which detracts from the heritage value of the item should occur; -adaptation is acceptable to achieve conservation, where this does not detract from cultural significance; -existing fabric should be recorded before disturbance occurs; -disturbance of fabric may occur in order to provide evidence needed for the making of decisions on the conservation of the place; -appropriate direction and supervision should be maintained at all stages of work (ibid, 2012, 8).

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementCarry out an Archaeological Assessment 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act general maintenace


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
The engaging in or carrying out by any person of alterations to the design of the golf course, except within an area extending 10 metres from Jarvisfield House, in any direction and providing no trees are removed or damaged.
Jun 28 1985
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0030502 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0030525 May 84 842672
Local Environmental PlanWollondilly LEP 2011 23 Feb 11   
National Trust of Australia register National Trust (NSW) Country Register4793   
Register of the National EstateJarvisfield Group330621 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Macarthur Region Heritage Study1985    No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAntill Park Country Golf Club2011Information for Members and Guests - General - Our History View detail
WrittenAntill Park Country Golf Club History, Jarvisfield View detail
WrittenAustralian Heritage Commission1981Jarvisfield, Picton: conservation and restoration (National Estate Grants Program report)
WrittenBlack Mountain Projects P/L (Peter Kabaila)2012Conservation Management Strategy - Jarvisfield, Picton, NSW
WrittenCarroll, Brian1983'Jarvisfield', in The Hume - Australia’s Highway of History – a Heritage Field Guide
WrittenCoupe, Hewitt & Cxerhalmi P/L, Architects1981Report on the Conservation of Jarvisfield
WrittenDistinctive Living Design2015Jarvisfield House Master Plan
WrittenHolliday, Stephen1979Golf Architecture
WrittenMaguire, Roslyn1984'Introducing Mr William Weaver, architect and engineer'
WrittenSimpson, Caroline, (postscript, in facsimile edition of:) Nesta Griffiths, G.1976Jarvisfield
WrittenWollondilly Shire Council1993Jarvisfield House, Picton (Heritage Properties Restoration Program report)
WrittenWollondilly Shire Council Historic Picton Walking Tour (pamphlet)

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045544
File number: EF14/5859; S90/2612; HC32852


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