Liverpool Railway Station group | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Liverpool Railway Station group

Item details

Name of item: Liverpool Railway Station group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Transport - Rail
Category: Railway Platform/ Station
Location: Lat: -33.9253300035 Long: 150.9267900030
Primary address: Great Southern Railway, Liverpool, NSW 2170
Local govt. area: Liverpool
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Gandangara

Boundary:

Station North: 5 metres from the northern edge of the station concourse South: 5 metres from the southern edge of the footbridge East: Property boundary to parkland along Georges River West: Property boundary to Bigge Street Goods Shed North: 5 metres from the edge of the goods shed South: 25 metres from the edge of the goods shed (to the boundary fence) and to include jib crane and associated items East: 10 metres from the edge of the goods shed West: 5 metres from the edge of the goods shed (to the boundary fence)
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Great Southern RailwayLiverpoolLiverpool  Primary Address
Bigge StreetLiverpoolLiverpool  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
RailCorpState Government03 Nov 98

Statement of significance:

Liverpool station building is a good example of a third class station building in the centre of a large scale redevelopment of the site. It indicates the change in technology and approach to railway construction. Liverpool goods shed is a rare brick structure on the State system which is substantially intact with platforms and jib crane. It is located in an historic town and is the last remnant of the early station and yard complex at the site. It is rare as one of the last two surviving brick goods sheds in the State.
Date significance updated: 27 Nov 00
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1879-1880
Physical description: BUILDINGS
station building - type 4 platform 1, c. 1880, RNE ,LEP
goods shed - through shed brick 80' x 32', c. 1879, RNE, LEP

STRUCTURES
platform faces - brick 1880
Date condition updated:02 Sep 14
Modifications and dates: Major station redevelopment c2000.
Current use: Railway Station
Former use: Railway Station

History

Historical notes: Aboriginal occupation, Early European Settlement of the Liverpool Region
Some 40,000 years before European settlement of this region of the Georges River, this land was occupied by the Darug people and the neighbouring Tharawal and Gandangara peoples. The land was known as Gunyungalung. The Georges River has been seen by some as the natural (east-west) boundary between the Darug, or 'woods' tribe, (north of the river and east to the coast); the 'coast' tribes of the Tharawal (south of the river and east to the coast) and the Gandangara (west of the river, inland). Others argue that the region around Liverpool (where the river runs generally west to Botany Bay) signifies an important north-south cultural divide between the Darug peoples living north of the river and the Tharawal to the south of the river. The river demarcated rather than divided groups, providing an 'important corridor of mobility' that enabled transport, communication, economic and cultural interaction up, down and across the river on light, rapid bark canoes (Goodall & Cadzow 2009: 21).

The Georges River area first felt the impact of European settlement in the 1790s when early settlers around the Parramatta area sought out fertile soils for cultivation, moving south along Prospect Creek to the alluvial flats around Liverpool. Facing the steep banks and sandstone cliffs of sections of the Georges River, settlement penetrated slowly in the 1790s.

From the early 1800s the area saw Aboriginal hostilities against settler intrusions with raids on settler crops and stock led first by Pemulwuy of the Bediagal (until his death in 1804, likely at the hands of settlers). Some prominent settlers, who argued that the smaller settlers were the aggressors, themselves sought communication and interaction with Aboriginals, employing them as shepherds and allowing them to remain on the fringes of their landholding. Governor King's 1801 edict, however, prevented settlers harbouring Aboriginal peoples thus effectively excluding Aboriginals from the settled areas. Following the Appin massacre of 1816 the Gandagara and Tharwal kept their distance from the settlers, but they remained around the Georges River.

Governor Macquarie's policy was two-pronged. He authorised settlers around the Georges River to take action against Aboriginal raiders and later instructed the military to make pre-emptive strikes. He also sought conciliation, meeting with the Tharawal when he toured the Cow Pastures in 1810. Kogi of the Tharawal was one who met with Macquarie and who, like other Tharawal, developed close relationships with settlers around the Liverpool area. In 1816 Macquarie issued a call to Aboriginals of the Georges River to lay down arms in return for food, education and secure title to land in the Liverpool area. Kogi was one who took up this option, receiving a King Plate from Macquarie which identified him as "King of the Georges River". Land grants were the only means of effecting land transfer prior to the 1850 legislation that reserved Crown land exclusively 'for the use of Aborigines'. The are few records of land grants to Aboriginals arising out of the 1816 agreement but there is anecdotal evidence of Aboriginal freehold land along the Georges River until the late 20th century (Goodall & Cadzow 2009: 47-56).

In 1810 the Liverpool area was the frontier of settlement, with its alluvial and clay soils increasingly being cleared for farming. Small farming enclaves characterised the area around Liverpool which Governor Macquarie proclaimed on 2 November 1810 as the first of his new towns. The first land grants followed. Partly because of Aboriginal hostilities the area did not take off for settlement, however, until the 1830s.

The construction of Liverpool Weir in 1836 would have impacted on the different Aboriginal groups' use of the river as a communication channel. The weir would also have gradually changed the ecology of the river upstream.
(Keating, 1996; Goodall & Cadzow, 2009; www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/aboriginalpeople.htm; Tuck & Douglas, 2002).

EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF LIVERPOOL
In 1810, following the lead of the prominent pioneer Thomas Moore, Governor Lachlan Macquarie set out on a surveying expedition along the newly discovered Georges River. On the undulating Cumberland Plain and the banks of the Georges River, Governor Macquarie located the new township of Liverpool. From this township, of the developing colony (Cserhalmi, CMP Vol 1, 1994; Liverpool Heritage Study Vol 1, 1992).

Commissioned by Governor Lachlan Macquarie and designed by Francis Greenway, St Luke's Church was built in 1818-1819 as part of Macquarie's establishment plan for the town of Liverpool. It was the smallest of the three major church designs commissioned by Macquarie from Greenway, the others being St James in Sydney and St Matthew's at Windsor. A rectory was built about the same time but was replaced in 1840.

The site for Liverpool was marked out by Macquarie in 1810. St Luke's Anglican church was one of the original public buildings for the town. Its foundation stone was laid in 1818 and the first service was held on 18 October 1819. Macquarie attended a service in December 1820. The building was not fully completed until the early 1820s. A rectory and school building, since demolished, were built close by.

Liverpool weir was built in 1836 to supply water to local farmers and the town and to serve as a causeway across the George's River. It was one of the two last convict-built public works at Liverpool, the other being Lennox's Lansdowne Bridge over the Prospect Creek on the Hume Highway, Lansvale (Keating, 1996, 63; ADB, Liston, 2009, 18; ).

Liverpool Railway Station:
The railway at Liverpool station was opened in September 1856. This, with the electic telegraph arriving in 1858, provided speedy, safe transport and communication and began the transformation of Liverpool into a major regional city (www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/ourcity/historyofliverpool.htm).

The coming of the railway to Liverpool, with the electic telegraph arriving in 1858, provided speedy, safe transport and communication and began the transformation of Liverpool into a major regional city (www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/ourcity/historyofliverpool.htm).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Railway Station-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Rail transport-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing rail transport-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This item is assessed as historically rare. This item is assessed as scientifically rare. This item is assessed as arch. rare. This item is assessed as socially rare.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0118102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental Plan 025125 Mar 94 0501331

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismAttraction Homepage2007Liverpool Railway Station group View detail

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez rez rez rez rez rez
rez rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045545
File number: H00/00174 & S96/00468


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.