The Manse | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

The Manse

Item details

Name of item: The Manse
Other name/s: Methodist Manse
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Presbytery/Rectory/ Vicarage/Manse
Location: Lat: -33.7700558201 Long: 150.8135192090
Primary address: 23 The Avenue, Mount Druitt, NSW 2770
Parish: Rooty Hill
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Blacktown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Deerubbin
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOTX DP412362
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
23 The AvenueMount DruittBlacktownRooty HillCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Blacktown City CouncilLocal Government 

Description

Builder/Maker: probably by local notable, John Harris
Physical description: The Manse:
A Victorian Georgian single storey brick house in rectagular plan with hipped roof and separately roofed verandah on two sides. The centrally placed small gable roof ventilator and replacement of the verandah floor are more recent modifications (LEP, 2002).

The Manse Reserve:
The Reserve is segregated into a number of interconnected visual units by nature of its layout and facilities.
The most visible part is located at the corner of The Avenue and Mount Druitt Road. This is largely undeveloped with a large stand of remnant Eucalyptus woodland with an understorey of long grasses. To the frontage along The Avenue an asphalt car park is located at the corner with koppers log fencing.

An open grass area and informal gravel car park connects this area to The Manse. The heritage building is located towards the eastern end of the site, with remnant trees and open grass. The building although forming a strong character in the Reserve is in poor condition and is fenced with unattractive chain link fencing. The Manse is currently undergoing renovation & repairs.

The adjoining land uses include, the 'Meals on Wheels' facility and areas of undeveloped land. The area to the south and east of The Manse consists of mown paddock grass and a scattered stand of endemic Eucalyptus woodland and is partially broken up by post and wire farm fencing with a dense clump of privet to the south western corner.

Reserve's remnant Cumberland Plain Woodland.
Although no flora survey was prepared as part of the plan of management process, the remnant native trees area consistent with the vegetation community found at the nearby Dr. Charles McKay Reserve at Beames Avenue, Mount Druitt which is dominated by grey box (Eucalyptus punctata) and narrow-leafed ironbark (E.crebra) Woodland.

Although little endemic understorey exists on site; the remnant native trees are consistent with this community and may have potential for regeneration. The typical structure of the community would be scattered woodland to open forest and the understorey characterised by the shrubs blackthorn (Bursaria spinosa), spider flower (Grevillea juniperina), ham and eggs (Pultenaea microphylla) and the pea flower, Dillwynia juniperina. Common grasses would include kangaroo grass (Themeda australis), Danthonia sp. and Microlaena stipoides.

Garden Planting:
Little heritage planting appears to remain in association with The Manse. These cultural plantings are not of significance and include privet (Ligustrum sp.), oleander (Nerium oleander cv.) and cypress pine (Callitris sp.).

There have been no improvements for open space or recreational usage on the site other than the car park and some fencing. The Reserve is to all intents undeveloped for recreational or community use. The car park and associated fencing on the corner of Mount Druitt Road & The Avenue are partially within the Reserve boundaries. The asphalt surface is uneven and in poor repair. There is an unformed informal car park adjacent to the Manse.

Fencing:
There are a number of differing fences within the Reserve, including boundary fencing, post & rail fencing, security fencing around The Manse and sections of remnant post and wire farm fencing to the rear of The Manse, reminiscent of the sites earlier semi-rural land use. The majority of these fences within the Reserve are in poor repair (Sturt & Associates, 2009, 17, modified by Stuart Read, 6/1/2010).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
1/2008: discovery of a cistern during excavation work.
Date condition updated:20 Feb 08
Modifications and dates: The centrally placed small gable roof ventilator and replacement of the verandah floor are more recent modifications (LEP, 2002).
2001+ rented out - a fireplace, an organ and other items disappeared from the property.
2007-8 works to adaptively reuse it as a community museum and research centre.: conservation & restoration of building. ALso demolition of an intrusive addition.
6/2008: Council restoration is nearing completion by August 2008 - it will be given to the Mt Druitt Historical Society once completed to use to store historical data and will be open 3 days a week, hosting speakers, walks (Mt Druitt St Marys Standard, 11/6/08 p.6).
Current use: community museum and research centre (proposed use)
Former use: residence, manse

History

Historical notes: The Mount Druitt area played an important part in the early colonial history of NSW. It was one of three areas along with Prospect and Colyton, clustered some 45km west of the Sydney Cove settlement at Port Jackson.

In 1821 Governor Macquarie granted 1000 acres to Major George Druitt (1775-1842), officer of the 48th Regiment, magistrate and Chief Engineer of roads and buildings during Macquarie's term (1810-21). Druitt became a notable figure in the life of the colony. Macquarie appointed him colonial engineer and inspector of public works, and he supervised construction of many of architect Francis Greenway's buildings (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 182).

This original 'Mount Druitt' estate was bounded on the south by the Great Western Road (now Highway) commencing at Ropes Creek Bridge and on the east by a line bearing west to Ropes Creek and bounded in the west by the creek itself.

The land on which the Manse sits today was originally part of land granted to Major Druitt in November 1837. Between 1837 and 1881 the land had repeated changes of ownership.

In March 1881, a Strathfield real estate agent, George Kennedy King purchased two large sections of land that had formed part of the original Mt Druitt estate. These two sections comprised a total area of 310 acres and were created via Lees' 1855 subdivision. Upon purchase of the land, King engaged Sydney-based surveyors, Dawson and Stephen, to facilitate two further large subdivisions of the land. The first subdivision of approximately 200 acres was located south of the railway line and was advertised as the "Garfield subdivision" - this subdivision included the land upon which The Manse was later built. (Rappoport 2005).

The Conservation Management Plan (CMP) prepared by Rappoport (2005) records no definitive construction date. However it
states that The Manse was constructed in the late 1880s and is distinctly Victorian Georgian in architectural style. Graham Edds & Associates (2007)... states, 'The former manse ...appears to have been built in the 1880s, probably by local notable, John Harris of Shanes Park.'

Blacktown DCP states that The Manse was built c1880s following subdivision of the Druitt Estate and comprises a single storey brick residence in rectangular plan, with hipped roof and skillion verandah on two sides. The property was owned and occupied by the Kennedy family until circa 1895 when they donated it to the Presbyterian Church.'

The Kennedys were devout Presbyterians and when a new church was being built there was nowhere for the Minister to live. The Kennedys donated the house to the Church and it became a manse.

From 1896 onwards The Manse continued as the Presbyterian minister's residence housing a succession of ministers of the Mount Druitt congregation. Reverend George Milne occupying The Manse from about 1913 until 1930 (Sturt & Associates, 2009, 15)

A very fine and largely intact early country style dwelling, it is the oldest remaining building in Mount Druitt and was a private residence until 1895 (LEP, 2002, paraphrased).

In 1966 a new housing area was planned at the original settlement of Mount Druitt. Using Mount Druitt itself as the centre for major shopping, entertainment and other facilities, the scheme planned to create new suburbs. Extra shopping complexes were envistaged. But as house building went ahead, construction of other necessary buildings slowed down and they were not finished until 1973. There are now six government high schools and fourteen primary schools in the district (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 182).

After a split in the Church, Blacktown City Council bought the house in 2001 and rented it out as a residence (Sturt & Associates, 2009, 15).

During this period a fireplace, an organ and other items disappeared from the building. From 2007-8 Council have undertaken conservation and restoration works to the property to prepare it for a community use. It is planned to use it as a museum and research centre (Blacktown Advocate, 2008)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - parks and open spaces-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing community facilities-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Presbyterianism-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0020602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0020617 Feb 84 240789
Local Environmental PlanThe Manse 03 Jan 92   
National Trust of Australia register The Manse10478   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenBlacktown Advocate, 20/2/20082008Restoration of an historic gem
WrittenGraham Edds & Associates2007The Manse 23 The Avenue, Mt Druitt : fabric significance review and schedule of conservation works
WrittenGuy Sturt & Associates2009Plan of Management - Reserve 728, The Manse, The Avenue, Mt.Druitt View detail
WrittenPollon, F. & Healy, G. (editor and writers)1988Mount Druitt entry in 'The Book of Sydney Suburbs'
WrittenRappoport Heritage Consultants2005Conservation Management Plan: The Manse, The Avenue, Mt.Druitt

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045548
File number: S90/06151 & HC 32130


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